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When you play DQ do you prefer to take things slow by  talking to the NPCs and breaking all the barrels and pots and raiding all the dressers and using party chat, or do you prefer to just complete the main objective then move on to your next destination. I personally take my time and explore the town completely.

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A mix. I'm not usually into the party chat. It's awesome and I do enjoy it, but I'm typically not patient enough to read it.

 

But I do break every pot, raid each house and talk to everyone.

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I like just playing, trying to take it in and do it in a memorable way to gain nostalgia for it, I also prefer listening to stuff like nightwish, as when I was younger I always heard that at around the same time I started Dragon Quest. 

Back then, I used brawn over brains, and never even used twinhits or increase. 

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Slow mostly. I check everything for items (pots, cupboards, etc) talk to all NPCs and party chat, and if I don't - even if I've played the game so many times such as with DQ4 - I still have to talk to everyone.

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Slooow.

 

Talk to everyone, check everything, talk to everyone again after checking everything. And I do party chat multiple times after each conversation, until it is obvious there is no more party chat left.

 

As such, I could never understand all the complaining about missing shards in Dragon Warrior VII.

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Depends on what I want to do.  Sometimes I like to drag it out, talk to everyone, break all pots, search the entire town, even if I know exactly which spots to go, whom to talk to, and where all items are...even what bookcases actually have books I can read.  Sometimes I like to rush through it a bit, or speed things up a little, and be pickier about which extra npcs I'll talk to.

 

Same with gameplay.  Sometimes I want to run a seed run. Sometimes I want to get everything and anything.  Sometimes I want a challenge in some form.  Othertimes I want to just dominate, and yet other times I don't care, I'll just play and whatever happens, happens.

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Depends on what I want to do.  Sometimes I like to drag it out, talk to everyone, break all pots, search the entire town, even if I know exactly which spots to go, whom to talk to, and where all items are...even what bookcases actually have books I can read.  Sometimes I like to rush through it a bit, or speed things up a little, and be pickier about which extra npcs I'll talk to.

 

Same with gameplay.  Sometimes I want to run a seed run. Sometimes I want to get everything and anything.  Sometimes I want a challenge in some form.  Othertimes I want to just dominate, and yet other times I don't care, I'll just play and whatever happens, happens.

In your case, since you do playthroughs with specific goals, I'd like to reiterate the original question but for your first time playing each DQ.

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Depends on my mood, the time, planetary alignment, phase of the moon...basically, no pattern at all, whatever I'm feeling.

The phase of the moon is always an important factor.

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Depends on what I want to do.  Sometimes I like to drag it out, talk to everyone, break all pots, search the entire town, even if I know exactly which spots to go, whom to talk to, and where all items are...even what bookcases actually have books I can read.  Sometimes I like to rush through it a bit, or speed things up a little, and be pickier about which extra npcs I'll talk to.

 

Same with gameplay.  Sometimes I want to run a seed run. Sometimes I want to get everything and anything.  Sometimes I want a challenge in some form.  Othertimes I want to just dominate, and yet other times I don't care, I'll just play and whatever happens, happens.

In your case, since you do playthroughs with specific goals, I'd like to reiterate the original question but for your first time playing each DQ.

 

 

I take my sweet time.  My first DQ7 playthrough was like 250 hours.  I savor every single second, and attempt to talk to everyone, and try to remember, for those games with party chat, to use it at every opportunity, even 2~3x just to make sure there isn't some extra chat to get out of it.

 

Hell, I'll even triple check certain maps for items, even when I'm reasonably sure I've found everything.  I'll stay in a dungeon just to make sure I've found every monster, and unlocked all data in the scroll/big book of beasts.

 

In DQ9, I didn't even consider ending the main storyline until around 230~240 hours in.

 

In DQ8, I never even LEFT Farebury until around 15~20 hours into the game.  I wanted to be absolutely positive I had seen every nook and cranny of the map, seen every enemy, gotten just enough skill points to make both Swords and Boomerangs useful, and assured Yangus could use both Axe and Hammer skills.  OH right, and I wanted to assure I could beat every Notorious monster on the map, though I was forced to give in on attempting to take down the Battle Rex.  I think I took on Khalamari around the 50th hour?  Something like that.

Edited by ignasia7
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Slow. Slooooow.

 

Talk to every NPC, check Party Chat

 

Get a key item, check Party Chat

 

Break and open everything I can find in town

 

Break and open everything I can find in dungeons (in dungeons I sometimes don't open chests though, in fear of it being a fake)

 

Kill a boss, check Party Chat

 

...In other words, I pretty much take it as slow as possible :P

 

Depending on the game, I sometimes come back in the post-game to complete my Monster Book (which I intend to do when VII 3DS is released in English!)

Edited by gooieooie
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I just go through it. I don't really try to set atmosphere with games. If it's a good game, I shouldn't be concerned with the atmosphere because the game should be sucking me in.

 

In terms of how I approach it, I just play till I'm tired and stop. I never really set out to do any side quests unless it'll benefit me. I've never been a person to revel in the amount of time I play a game anyway, I just find it good for the shock value. When I beat the game and I want to do more, I seek out what's left to do until I've had enough. Nothing magical in my approach, but it's tried and true.

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Usually first playthrough is all about following the story for me, bypassing most secrets, excessive grinding, and the like (can make for some very interesting Boss Battles this way). So, rather breezy then. Once I've gotten a feel for the game, know what to expect, how much I can dilly-dally with side-quests, I take my time meticulously exploring everything in any subsequent playthrough.

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If you don't like taking it slow, then I wonder what you're doing playing these games.

 

Everyone has their own way of doing things, and enjoying them in that way.  In Sykonee's case, it seems like going slow seems to be on his second run, but the first is just getting through it, to know it, learn the system, get the basic ghist of the story, and from there deciding how he wishes to play, based on his first experience.  I would imagine, if he really liked the story and the bits of party chat, he would be wading deep into that pool, and if he preferred the battle system, or class system, or leveling system, he'd wade deep into that, all on his subsequent playthroughs.

 

I understand that mentality very well, since sometimes taking a first playthrough slowly can be overwhelming, and it's easy to get lost.  Especially if life gets in the way, and there's a lot of extra stuff to see and do.  Best to keep the game core story and core gameplay elements fresh on the first playthrough to get a real feel for whether it's enjoyable or not.  Especially if a major project pops up at work, it's easier to recall the story and core gameplay and the feelings associated with those two elements under such conditions.  I've forced myself to play that way a few times. 

 

I had to on my second playthrough of DQ7, because my first I stopped cold. It was just too much, and I didn't have the time.  I was about 60 hours in and just entering Dune, but playing maybe 2~7 hours a week, and the monotony was getting to me.  I ended up hating DQ7 as a result.  I despised the game, because of MY OCD habits and the decisions I made, and the course my life had taken at that time.  I came back to it, played it just straight through, kept it simple, and it became number 1 on my game list. Third playthrough I kind of treat as my first true playthrough and usually call it my first, because I took my sweet ass time as I normally do.  Had my life been less hectic when I first bought the game, I would have had an easy time playing it my normal fashion.

Edited by ignasia7
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If you don't like taking it slow, then I wonder what you're doing playing these games.

Everyone has their own way of doing things, and enjoying them in that way. In Sykonee's case, it seems like going slow seems to be on his second run, but the first is just getting through it, to know it, learn the system, get the basic ghist of the story, and from there deciding how he wishes to play, based on his first experience. I would imagine, if he really liked the story and the bits of party chat, he would be wading deep into that pool, and if he preferred the battle system, or class system, or leveling system, he'd wade deep into that, all on his subsequent playthroughs.

 

I understand that mentality very well, since sometimes taking a first playthrough slowly can be overwhelming, and it's easy to get lost. Especially if life gets in the way, and there's a lot of extra stuff to see and do. Best to keep the game core story and core gameplay elements fresh on the first playthrough to get a real feel for whether it's enjoyable or not. Especially if a major project pops up at work, it's easier to recall the story and core gameplay and the feelings associated with those two elements under such conditions. I've forced myself to play that way a few times. I had to on my second playthrough of DQ7, because my first I stopped cold. It was just too much, and I didn't have the time. I was about 60 hours in and just entering Dune, but playing maybe 2~7 hours a week, and the monotony was getting to me. I ended up hating DQ7 as a result. I despised the game, because of MY OCD habits and the decisions I made, and the course my life had taken at that time. I came back to it, played it just straight through, kept it simple, and it became number 1 on my game list. Third playthrough I kind of treat as my first true playthrough and usually call it my first, because I took my sweet ass time as I normally do. Had my life been less hectic when I first bought the game, I would have had an easy time playing it my normal fashion.

I can understand that. I was merely making an ironic reference to how so many people call the Dragon Quest franchise, and especially the seventh installment, total $#!&, because of the required grinding.
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If you don't like taking it slow, then I wonder what you're doing playing these games.

Everyone has their own way of doing things, and enjoying them in that way. In Sykonee's case, it seems like going slow seems to be on his second run, but the first is just getting through it, to know it, learn the system, get the basic ghist of the story, and from there deciding how he wishes to play, based on his first experience. I would imagine, if he really liked the story and the bits of party chat, he would be wading deep into that pool, and if he preferred the battle system, or class system, or leveling system, he'd wade deep into that, all on his subsequent playthroughs.

 

I understand that mentality very well, since sometimes taking a first playthrough slowly can be overwhelming, and it's easy to get lost. Especially if life gets in the way, and there's a lot of extra stuff to see and do. Best to keep the game core story and core gameplay elements fresh on the first playthrough to get a real feel for whether it's enjoyable or not. Especially if a major project pops up at work, it's easier to recall the story and core gameplay and the feelings associated with those two elements under such conditions. I've forced myself to play that way a few times. I had to on my second playthrough of DQ7, because my first I stopped cold. It was just too much, and I didn't have the time. I was about 60 hours in and just entering Dune, but playing maybe 2~7 hours a week, and the monotony was getting to me. I ended up hating DQ7 as a result. I despised the game, because of MY OCD habits and the decisions I made, and the course my life had taken at that time. I came back to it, played it just straight through, kept it simple, and it became number 1 on my game list. Third playthrough I kind of treat as my first true playthrough and usually call it my first, because I took my sweet ass time as I normally do. Had my life been less hectic when I first bought the game, I would have had an easy time playing it my normal fashion.

I can understand that. I was merely making an ironic reference to how so many people call the Dragon Quest franchise, and especially the seventh installment, total $#!&, because of the required grinding.

 

 

LOL, yeah, I know right?  My saving grace attempt I spent not one moment grinding, and I loved every minute of it.  The game does compel one to grind, but certainly doesn't require it.  Heh, I'm glad I did, because that retry of my normal style...oh yeah, so much fun.  I had every base class maxed and all hybrid leaving Dharma, then played through normally until Disc 2, then grinded out the rest of the upper tier and monster classes.  Shame I let Melvin and Aira fall behind a bit, but Gabo and "Enix" were just dominating everything, and eh, Disc 2 grinding is quite satisfying.

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If you don't like taking it slow, then I wonder what you're doing playing these games.

Everyone has their own way of doing things, and enjoying them in that way. In Sykonee's case, it seems like going slow seems to be on his second run, but the first is just getting through it, to know it, learn the system, get the basic ghist of the story, and from there deciding how he wishes to play, based on his first experience. I would imagine, if he really liked the story and the bits of party chat, he would be wading deep into that pool, and if he preferred the battle system, or class system, or leveling system, he'd wade deep into that, all on his subsequent playthroughs.

 

I understand that mentality very well, since sometimes taking a first playthrough slowly can be overwhelming, and it's easy to get lost. Especially if life gets in the way, and there's a lot of extra stuff to see and do. Best to keep the game core story and core gameplay elements fresh on the first playthrough to get a real feel for whether it's enjoyable or not. Especially if a major project pops up at work, it's easier to recall the story and core gameplay and the feelings associated with those two elements under such conditions. I've forced myself to play that way a few times. I had to on my second playthrough of DQ7, because my first I stopped cold. It was just too much, and I didn't have the time. I was about 60 hours in and just entering Dune, but playing maybe 2~7 hours a week, and the monotony was getting to me. I ended up hating DQ7 as a result. I despised the game, because of MY OCD habits and the decisions I made, and the course my life had taken at that time. I came back to it, played it just straight through, kept it simple, and it became number 1 on my game list. Third playthrough I kind of treat as my first true playthrough and usually call it my first, because I took my sweet ass time as I normally do. Had my life been less hectic when I first bought the game, I would have had an easy time playing it my normal fashion.

I can understand that. I was merely making an ironic reference to how so many people call the Dragon Quest franchise, and especially the seventh installment, total $#!&, because of the required grinding.

LOL, yeah, I know right? My saving grace attempt I spent not one moment grinding, and I loved every minute of it. The game does compel one to grind, but certainly doesn't require it. Heh, I'm glad I did, because that retry of my normal style...oh yeah, so much fun. I had every base class maxed and all hybrid leaving Dharma, then played through normally until Disc 2, then grinded out the rest of the upper tier and monster classes. Shame I let Melvin and Aira fall behind a bit, but Gabo and "Enix" were just dominating everything, and eh, Disc 2 grinding is quite satisfying.

Depends what you mean by "grinding". My first time at a Dragon Quest game left me confused, not realising why I couldn't just skim through bosses like I would do with other games. But it certainly increased my patience.
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If you don't like taking it slow, then I wonder what you're doing playing these games.

Everyone has their own way of doing things, and enjoying them in that way. In Sykonee's case, it seems like going slow seems to be on his second run, but the first is just getting through it, to know it, learn the system, get the basic ghist of the story, and from there deciding how he wishes to play, based on his first experience. I would imagine, if he really liked the story and the bits of party chat, he would be wading deep into that pool, and if he preferred the battle system, or class system, or leveling system, he'd wade deep into that, all on his subsequent playthroughs.

 

I understand that mentality very well, since sometimes taking a first playthrough slowly can be overwhelming, and it's easy to get lost. Especially if life gets in the way, and there's a lot of extra stuff to see and do. Best to keep the game core story and core gameplay elements fresh on the first playthrough to get a real feel for whether it's enjoyable or not. Especially if a major project pops up at work, it's easier to recall the story and core gameplay and the feelings associated with those two elements under such conditions. I've forced myself to play that way a few times. I had to on my second playthrough of DQ7, because my first I stopped cold. It was just too much, and I didn't have the time. I was about 60 hours in and just entering Dune, but playing maybe 2~7 hours a week, and the monotony was getting to me. I ended up hating DQ7 as a result. I despised the game, because of MY OCD habits and the decisions I made, and the course my life had taken at that time. I came back to it, played it just straight through, kept it simple, and it became number 1 on my game list. Third playthrough I kind of treat as my first true playthrough and usually call it my first, because I took my sweet ass time as I normally do. Had my life been less hectic when I first bought the game, I would have had an easy time playing it my normal fashion.

I can understand that. I was merely making an ironic reference to how so many people call the Dragon Quest franchise, and especially the seventh installment, total $#!&, because of the required grinding.

LOL, yeah, I know right? My saving grace attempt I spent not one moment grinding, and I loved every minute of it. The game does compel one to grind, but certainly doesn't require it. Heh, I'm glad I did, because that retry of my normal style...oh yeah, so much fun. I had every base class maxed and all hybrid leaving Dharma, then played through normally until Disc 2, then grinded out the rest of the upper tier and monster classes. Shame I let Melvin and Aira fall behind a bit, but Gabo and "Enix" were just dominating everything, and eh, Disc 2 grinding is quite satisfying.

Next thing you'll be telling us is you grounded as soon as you hit Dharma and used nothing but UltraHit to get through the game on another run. :P

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On my initial play-through I almost always skip the bonus dungeon (if there is one) and go back and play through the game completely on a second play-through.

 

I talk to everyone in the town, break every pot, check every barrel, and if the game is DWVII or DQVIII, I check any wall-sacks as well.  I don't really care about party chat, so I don't spend much time with it.

 

I have a lot of long-term DQ goals.  For DQV, I played through the game with each bride choice for the SFC version, and once with Bianca in the DS version.  On my second SFC playthrough where I married Flora, that's when I tackled the bonus dungeon.  I may eventually get to replaying DQV two more times for DS, someday, but I have other goals of higher priority right now.  I'm in bonus dungeons for DQIII mobile and DQVI-SFC, and it's a long slow grind before I'll be ready for either bonus dungeon boss.  I'm also not actively playing either.  I'd like to eventually play through DW7's bonus dungeon, but that may not happen before the 3DS release, because DW7 is really long.

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I usually enjoy as much of the story as I can. I'll explore all the towns, check all the pots I can, see what I can find. I'll sometimes grind a little bit depending on how I did with the last boss I fought. I rarely do party chat, so I didn't miss it that much when it was cut out of DQ4 on the DS.

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If you don't like taking it slow, then I wonder what you're doing playing these games.

Everyone has their own way of doing things, and enjoying them in that way. In Sykonee's case, it seems like going slow seems to be on his second run, but the first is just getting through it, to know it, learn the system, get the basic ghist of the story, and from there deciding how he wishes to play, based on his first experience. I would imagine, if he really liked the story and the bits of party chat, he would be wading deep into that pool, and if he preferred the battle system, or class system, or leveling system, he'd wade deep into that, all on his subsequent playthroughs.

 

I understand that mentality very well, since sometimes taking a first playthrough slowly can be overwhelming, and it's easy to get lost. Especially if life gets in the way, and there's a lot of extra stuff to see and do. Best to keep the game core story and core gameplay elements fresh on the first playthrough to get a real feel for whether it's enjoyable or not. Especially if a major project pops up at work, it's easier to recall the story and core gameplay and the feelings associated with those two elements under such conditions. I've forced myself to play that way a few times. I had to on my second playthrough of DQ7, because my first I stopped cold. It was just too much, and I didn't have the time. I was about 60 hours in and just entering Dune, but playing maybe 2~7 hours a week, and the monotony was getting to me. I ended up hating DQ7 as a result. I despised the game, because of MY OCD habits and the decisions I made, and the course my life had taken at that time. I came back to it, played it just straight through, kept it simple, and it became number 1 on my game list. Third playthrough I kind of treat as my first true playthrough and usually call it my first, because I took my sweet ass time as I normally do. Had my life been less hectic when I first bought the game, I would have had an easy time playing it my normal fashion.

I can understand that. I was merely making an ironic reference to how so many people call the Dragon Quest franchise, and especially the seventh installment, total $#!&, because of the required grinding.

LOL, yeah, I know right? My saving grace attempt I spent not one moment grinding, and I loved every minute of it. The game does compel one to grind, but certainly doesn't require it. Heh, I'm glad I did, because that retry of my normal style...oh yeah, so much fun. I had every base class maxed and all hybrid leaving Dharma, then played through normally until Disc 2, then grinded out the rest of the upper tier and monster classes. Shame I let Melvin and Aira fall behind a bit, but Gabo and "Enix" were just dominating everything, and eh, Disc 2 grinding is quite satisfying.

Next thing you'll be telling us is you grounded as soon as you hit Dharma and used nothing but UltraHit to get through the game on another run. :P

 

 

I barely ever use Ultra HIt.  I always switch things up, mix and match, and use skills and attacks that can deal damage.  Ultra Hit I use now and again when I feel like it.

 

Just because I like grinding out certain things doesn't imply I act like Vegh.  Vegh goes for his single tactic, then only plays with that.  Even as he sometimes pretends other skills don't work...you know, skills he's never actually claimed to use, but implies they don't work or work poorly comparatively, so he only ever uses his default attack.

Edited by ignasia7
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I try and do the same with the job class games. I'd like to try something "crazy" and switch around the usually job classes for characters in 6. Basically make Carver more magic based and Milly more physical based for instance.

 

 

Just checking to see if you ever channeled you-know-who from GameFAQs. :P

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