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Megalosaro

This will be the finest Dragon Quest

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, mobile-only version of Dragon Quest... , a quarter of the length of DQ6

 

All IMO, of course.

In your opinion, how long was DQVI?

And how long was DQIX?

 

I can see (but not agree) your other points and that's fine, but I'm wondering about this point.

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DQIX technically had the most "epic" story, except maybe vii.

 

The main character is an angel. God is essentially killed at the beginning of the game. You have a cursed kingdom returning from beyond the grave. Sure, it wasn't the most intimate story, but in terms of concepts you can't call it epicless.

 

Yeah, I suppose thematically. But the whole thing felt like an undercooked, mobile-only version of Dragon Quest - it only had a quarter of the world size of DQ8, a quarter of the classes of DQ7, a quarter of the length of DQ6, a quarter of the heart of DQ5, a quarter of the charm of DQ4...

 

But it DID have a monstrous and completely pointless post-game grind of epic length, which I guess some people loved but I didn't see any point in whatsoever. Post-game, to me, should tie into the core content, not be an essentially endless (and tedious) exercise of the battle system. But it was clearly aimed at a mobile market, bite-sized installment gameplay style, which to me felt both hollow and... well, decidedly un-epic in comparison to it's superior peers.

 

All IMO, of course.

 

 

You could also say...

 

The world is thrice as large as 7.  Twice the classes of 3.  Twice as long as 5.  Ten times more heart and gut wrenching than 4.  Charm beyond measure compared to 2.  Darker than any but 7.  More story closures than all before it.  The first to let you dress up your characters in goofy or flashy outfits.  The first time one could actually look like heroes of DQ past, while taking on their former bosses, or switch it up, have DQ2 look alikes take on all the Legacies!  The first to expand the battle system to a point where it has so many options, tactics, and depth, it rivals virtually all WRPG's in breadth and scope of concept, while yet retaining the simplicity and sense of nostalgic old-school DQ...which is the biggest leap in tactical shifts and additions since DQ6, and a larger leap THAN DQ6.

 

I also can't agree with your note on the charm of the game.  9 has a lot on the surface, and a lot buried deep.  Heck, it even finishes off the storylines to epic completion with the post-game quests, fully closing off individual stories and giving them that extra special touch.  You're going to tell me the moments with Erinn weren't charming?  Or saving the Wight Knight from his fate of being trapped by Morag wasn't?  Or watching the young warrior, then helping him, save his tribe in Batsureg wasn't?  What about the school master teaching his errant boys and girls to behave, only when coming to his senses, is so apologetic and polite, simply wanting them to become good and studious children with bright futures, instead of slackers with darker ones?  C'mon now THAT has charm written all over it.  Nevermind the epic ending of a girl seeking the one person whom she cared for, in a torrid love seemingly forbidden, and yet not, as it is recognized by the stars?  You think DQ4's story has more charm by comparison?  Maybe it's the quest system, which is a bit off-putting for most objectives, but their design is to teach and broaden the scope of horizon for any player new or old, and work as a sort of Tutorial, with gifts at the end, allowing players to expand their knowledge of what the game system allows for them.  I mean...damn son, that's a charming approach, but I do agree the design was a little flawed, as the approach lacked proper explanation of its intended purpose, and most saw them as tedious.

 

I don't know, I'd say DQ9 packs a lot of charm.

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...Word.

 

But dangnabbit, Iggy, you beat me to it! xD Oh well, I've gotta say... you were most certainly right on with the point of charm. There were a few things even I didn't like about DQIX but charm...? I'd have to put its charm as just about #01. So thanks for stealing the words right out of my mouth, Iggy! ^^

 

Anyways, I definitely think that DQXI will slurprise everyone... I mean, wow. The hype levels are already maxed out and how much about it do we know? Vast worlds, a choice between visible and random encounters, graphic differences for fans of DQVIII and fans of DQIX (Which I am both of, so I'll probably end up getting both assuming they're both released over here)... and a differently designed hero who may or may not be the Dragonlord (I'm leaning on 'not'... but that's just how I feel about it). It can only get better from here! Or that's what I think at least... I feel like the hype levels are gonna get broken... we may need a bigger hype meter... xD

Edited by Hoshino22

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DQIX technically had the most "epic" story, except maybe vii.

 

The main character is an angel. God is essentially killed at the beginning of the game. You have a cursed kingdom returning from beyond the grave. Sure, it wasn't the most intimate story, but in terms of concepts you can't call it epicless.

 

Yeah, I suppose thematically. But the whole thing felt like an undercooked, mobile-only version of Dragon Quest - it only had a quarter of the world size of DQ8, a quarter of the classes of DQ7, a quarter of the length of DQ6, a quarter of the heart of DQ5, a quarter of the charm of DQ4...

 

But it DID have a monstrous and completely pointless post-game grind of epic length, which I guess some people loved but I didn't see any point in whatsoever. Post-game, to me, should tie into the core content, not be an essentially endless (and tedious) exercise of the battle system. But it was clearly aimed at a mobile market, bite-sized installment gameplay style, which to me felt both hollow and... well, decidedly un-epic in comparison to it's superior peers.

 

All IMO, of course.

 

 

You could also say...

 

The world is thrice as large as 7.  Twice the classes of 3.  Twice as long as 5.  Ten times more heart and gut wrenching than 4.  Charm beyond measure compared to 2.  Darker than any but 7.  More story closures than all before it.  The first to let you dress up your characters in goofy or flashy outfits.  The first time one could actually look like heroes of DQ past, while taking on their former bosses, or switch it up, have DQ2 look alikes take on all the Legacies!  The first to expand the battle system to a point where it has so many options, tactics, and depth, it rivals virtually all WRPG's in breadth and scope of concept, while yet retaining the simplicity and sense of nostalgic old-school DQ...which is the biggest leap in tactical shifts and additions since DQ6, and a larger leap THAN DQ6.

 

I also can't agree with your note on the charm of the game.  9 has a lot on the surface, and a lot buried deep.  Heck, it even finishes off the storylines to epic completion with the post-game quests, fully closing off individual stories and giving them that extra special touch.  You're going to tell me the moments with Erinn weren't charming?  Or saving the Wight Knight from his fate of being trapped by Morag wasn't?  Or watching the young warrior, then helping him, save his tribe in Batsureg wasn't?  What about the school master teaching his errant boys and girls to behave, only when coming to his senses, is so apologetic and polite, simply wanting them to become good and studious children with bright futures, instead of slackers with darker ones?  C'mon now THAT has charm written all over it.  Nevermind the epic ending of a girl seeking the one person whom she cared for, in a torrid love seemingly forbidden, and yet not, as it is recognized by the stars?  You think DQ4's story has more charm by comparison?  Maybe it's the quest system, which is a bit off-putting for most objectives, but their design is to teach and broaden the scope of horizon for any player new or old, and work as a sort of Tutorial, with gifts at the end, allowing players to expand their knowledge of what the game system allows for them.  I mean...damn son, that's a charming approach, but I do agree the design was a little flawed, as the approach lacked proper explanation of its intended purpose, and most saw them as tedious.

 

I don't know, I'd say DQ9 packs a lot of charm.

 

Yeah, I absolutely love DQIX's world. Maybe more than DQIX itself, since the game iitself is quite flawed.

Walking through all those environments is still as much as a pleasure each time. 

That was the first time I really thought i was a part of a complete world, not just one designed for RPGs purposes. (there has whole parts with absolutely nothing on it. This is so great.)

And its musical score is just fantastic.

If DQXI can offer me the same pleasure, then it's going to be good.

 

DQVI... I like it mostly because it's my first DQ ever (technically it's DQM, but i didn't even knew it was a DQ at the time).

It's the game who made me became the fan I'm now, so it can't be totally bad right ? 

There is lots to love in this game. a lots of good things that while not introduced here, or necessarily developped to their best leads to a fun experience.

And the idea of Dream and Real world is brilliant.

What I will concede though, is that it probabluy has one of the lowest musical score overall. 

From this game alone, I would consider Sugiyama to be a pretty mediocere composer (which is wrong obviously. Being able to encompass the whole idea of a flying train in a single track (yeah, DQIX again) is nothing sort of amazing.)

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DQIX technically had the most "epic" story, except maybe vii.

 

The main character is an angel. God is essentially killed at the beginning of the game. You have a cursed kingdom returning from beyond the grave. Sure, it wasn't the most intimate story, but in terms of concepts you can't call it epicless.

 

Yeah, I suppose thematically. But the whole thing felt like an undercooked, mobile-only version of Dragon Quest - it only had a quarter of the world size of DQ8, a quarter of the classes of DQ7, a quarter of the length of DQ6, a quarter of the heart of DQ5, a quarter of the charm of DQ4...

 

But it DID have a monstrous and completely pointless post-game grind of epic length, which I guess some people loved but I didn't see any point in whatsoever. Post-game, to me, should tie into the core content, not be an essentially endless (and tedious) exercise of the battle system. But it was clearly aimed at a mobile market, bite-sized installment gameplay style, which to me felt both hollow and... well, decidedly un-epic in comparison to it's superior peers.

 

All IMO, of course.

 

 

You could also say...

 

The world is thrice as large as 7.  Twice the classes of 3.  Twice as long as 5.  Ten times more heart and gut wrenching than 4.  Charm beyond measure compared to 2.  Darker than any but 7.  More story closures than all before it.  The first to let you dress up your characters in goofy or flashy outfits.  The first time one could actually look like heroes of DQ past, while taking on their former bosses, or switch it up, have DQ2 look alikes take on all the Legacies!  The first to expand the battle system to a point where it has so many options, tactics, and depth, it rivals virtually all WRPG's in breadth and scope of concept, while yet retaining the simplicity and sense of nostalgic old-school DQ...which is the biggest leap in tactical shifts and additions since DQ6, and a larger leap THAN DQ6.

 

I also can't agree with your note on the charm of the game.  9 has a lot on the surface, and a lot buried deep.  Heck, it even finishes off the storylines to epic completion with the post-game quests, fully closing off individual stories and giving them that extra special touch.  You're going to tell me the moments with Erinn weren't charming?  Or saving the Wight Knight from his fate of being trapped by Morag wasn't?  Or watching the young warrior, then helping him, save his tribe in Batsureg wasn't?  What about the school master teaching his errant boys and girls to behave, only when coming to his senses, is so apologetic and polite, simply wanting them to become good and studious children with bright futures, instead of slackers with darker ones?  C'mon now THAT has charm written all over it.  Nevermind the epic ending of a girl seeking the one person whom she cared for, in a torrid love seemingly forbidden, and yet not, as it is recognized by the stars?  You think DQ4's story has more charm by comparison?  Maybe it's the quest system, which is a bit off-putting for most objectives, but their design is to teach and broaden the scope of horizon for any player new or old, and work as a sort of Tutorial, with gifts at the end, allowing players to expand their knowledge of what the game system allows for them.  I mean...damn son, that's a charming approach, but I do agree the design was a little flawed, as the approach lacked proper explanation of its intended purpose, and most saw them as tedious.

 

I don't know, I'd say DQ9 packs a lot of charm.

 

 

I'll give you that DQ9 had a rock-solid battle system, and the gameplay was certainly better than DQ8's.

 

Otherwise, it was like 40% actual story, 60% post-game grind with no story at all (yay! I got a map/orb/boot that does nothing but I can say I got it because it will help me get another map/orb/boot! And I can do this forever with absolutely zero narrative context to make it have any point!), a small world, small class system, and absolutely NO memorable characters. Stella? Corvus? Ok, I remember them. But compared to Torneko? Bianca? Ashlynn? I love them.

 

Definitely a step backwards for the franchise, from a perspective of narrative and pure scope. It was a much smaller, grindier game befitting a mobile title designed to be taken in small chunks that don't require you remember where you were or where you need to be. It's not like sitting down with any other Dragon Quest after a long absence, and having to 'suit up' to get re-immersed back in the flow of things.

 

Now if they could marry the gameplay and skill ideas with a quest worthy of the name - in both characters, scope, and world-building - we'd be on to something amazing.

 

Bring it, Squenix!

 

IMO, of course.

Edited by Omegaplex

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I enjoyed the immensity of the "post-game" content in IX.

Once you beat most DQ games, there's no mystery left, nothing left to explore, nothing new. You might get a bonus dungeon or a couple of last minute upgrades, but it's all usually very linear and there's this sense that the movie is over and you got a little easter egg at the end, but now it's time to leave the theater.

With IX, I really loved how the world continued to be mysterious even hundreds of hours after beating it. I put so much time into it, and I stillI feel like I only scratched the surface. I've been meaning to pick it up again lately and play it again from the beginning but I've been too busy to invest that much time.

Regarding XI, here's my prediciton: Not only will it be the finest DQ game ever, it will be the finest entry of anything ever. In fact, it will be the greatest thing ever created by man!!!

OK, maybe not. But I'm excited for it and I love the 16-bit look on the 3DS version. This might be the game that finally convinces me to get a PS4.

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, mobile-only version of Dragon Quest... , a quarter of the length of DQ6

 

All IMO, of course.

In your opinion, how long was DQVI?

And how long was DQIX?

 

I can see (but not agree) your other points and that's fine, but I'm wondering about this point.

 

 

Well, if you consider the narrative flow - the beginning, middle, and end if you will - DQ6 was way longer. The world was larger (and there were two of them!), the class system at least as robust (though structured differently with the skills stuff), and the small vignettes far outnumbered DQ9's.

 

On the flip side, you could say Dragon Quest IX was longer because - AFTER the narrative ended - the real game began. But I don't consider new map after new map - with no narrative to give any of it a point other than grinding for new doodads - part of the core game. I realize I'm in the minority there, but I don't find grinding just for it's own sake rewarding. That's why I think DQ4's post-game is post-game done right - it expands and enriches the game's narrative content, while adding some tough challenges on top if it. DQ9 only did that last part.

 

So length is very debatable, but content driven by narrative was far lengthier in DQ6, while you could pretty much grind yourself into oblivion much easier with DQ9.

 

A lot of people liked the mobile-style design and structure of DQ9. I just wasn't one of them. It had a dramatically different feal from any DQ game before it, hewing closest to DQ8, but with - again - much less content in the narrative-driven part of the title. I'm not one of the people who finds grinding rewarding simply for it's own sake - games that have awesome phat loot that only becomes available after the narrative ends drive me NUTS. Why do I need that loot, other than to say I got it? For optional bosses? What motivation do I have to defeat them, unless it enriches the narrative experience in some way? DQ9's optional bosses DID tread into nostalgia territory, but the random nature of their appearance and overall lack of purpose reminded me of MMORPGs, which I also find no satisfaction from playing. Just saying I did it isn't enough - for me - but I know a lot of people play simply for the challenge, and I think DQ9 will appeal to them a lot more, since much of that game's content was exactly for that purpose.

 

S'all good.

Edited by Omegaplex

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