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What does DQ mean to you? (A Project)

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Only a few minutes left, so I'll say:

 

A purely fun game experience. The turn based system crushes action based and ATB systems. The art style and music are miles above the competition. It holds my interest like no other series- and is the only game series where grinding is addictive as opposed to a chore.

 

Pure euphoria.

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Added!

 

And with that, submissions are now CLOSED!

 

Look forward to the second step soon.

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Here we are, folks: the second step of the project!

 

First, here is a list of submissions. If you see yours isn't there, please tell me. I double-checked, but if yours isn't there, then tell me. ;)

 

 

knighTeen87:

My Life As A Dragon Warrior

Dragon Quest series have always been a real adventure to me. Because;
Playing DQ3 (GBC) in the college classes without getting caught, it was always quite a dangerous adventure.
Shop by shop, searching for hama beads with my girlfriend to make a heal-slime, it was a tiring adventure.
Making my friends laugh with the jokes from Dragon Quest, it was a very funny adventure.
Learning how to play Tantagel Castle melody with my guitar, definitely was a cool adventure.
Walking in the streets with listening Dragon Quest musics, dreaming about that I am really a Dragon Warrior, it was a crazy adventure.
Saving Money for a Wii, just to play Dragon Quest Swords, it was a tough adventure.
Teaching my girlfriend how to play Rocket Slime on my DS, surely was a romantic adventure.
And after she learns how to play, getting back my DS from her, it was another tough adventure.
But most of all, playing through entire series and realizing that no Dragon Quest games left to play, it was a really sad adventure…

But usually, I prefer to play Dragon Quest games at nights,
Lonelier and quieter it gets, I get sucked more into the Dragon Quest world.
I enter to a whole new world and lost my connection with the real one.
Deep in the night, after those long adventurous hours, I took my heroes to inn to rest them quite a bit.
And when that sweet inn tune plays, i save my game and go to bed too.
Just like real heroes do…
Because, I am a Dragon Warrior…

-------------------------

Deadxxstars:

Dragon Quest is my safe happy place. It would be great to see all the games localized especially - DQ VII and DQ X.

-------------------------

Princess Lily:

Well, for me DQ was first game I could play when little without having to just watch grown-ups or older kids play. It started my love of turn based RPGs. It had free exploration, limited only by how well prepared you got to travel farther, you could play at your own pace, wich is good for people like me who absolutely hate time limited games like the Mario series games back then.

 

Also, I've fallen in love wit the critters in the series, like the common blue Slime with it's tear drop shape and ever cheery Akira Toriyama drawn smile that's so hard to replicate or the Healslime the blue jellyfish like critter who's name says it all it heals instead of hurts despite looking like a hurty real critter. I wish such critters were real, I'd love a Healslime as a pet or rather friend.

 

DQ also was one of first games to do monster allies and collecting them, with DQ 5, although poorly implemented at the time (and the remake not any better) still one of earliest instances of monster allies in gaming.

 

DQ 9 was my first true DQ experience, playing without looking up stuff on the internet and experiencing the game as a true first time experience, ironically FF 9 was my first true FF experience... 9 must be a magic number. (I prefer not using Roman Numerals)

 

So basically first enjoyable gaming experience and cute critters particularly the Slime family ones (though now also things like Khalamari Kid and Wooper Trooper I also adore).

--------------------------

ignasia7:


"What does Dragon Quest mean to you?"

 

 

That's a hard question to put into words.  The meaning changes each time I play, those various emotional or intellectual elements that tie together in the games that draw me to it, especially given the level of simplicity at face value, but the tremendous depth hidden underneath.

 

I suppose for me, due to writing FAQs for the series, there's that extra drive to go further, at least in terms of gameplay, and really see what I can do, and what I can't.  The small nuances that govern the system.  So it's a series that definitely draws me in to want to play more, to see what more I can wring out from it.  Whether I want a different type of replay, or maybe I just want to power up, or maybe I feel like sailing through the gameplay without any unnecessary grinding, just so I can stop and enjoy only the story, while the gameplay is an afterthought.

 

It's hard to pinpoint.  Each game means something different.  Does something different.  As a series it touches on a surprising variety of topics.  Historical concepts, sociological elements, some of those dark seedy elements of life, love, lust, and even family.  Granted, the surface layers give this impression of something shallow, but paying closer attention to the words and the obviously implied meanings and simple nuances as the shifting dialogue of Debora, as she goes from cold-hearted sadomasochist, to appreciative but hard and pushy, to openly caring and considerate, to the harsh realities of such gut wrenching loss as that of a sweet and considerate wife Katrina after her loving, but work obsessed and socially awkward husband saves the town from the wretched illness coming from the Quarantomb, and the aftermath of bringing him some sense of community and companionship to alleviate his loss, as he learns he is appreciated outside of his home, and comes to accept his role in the greater community.  Dragon Quest storylines have a lot to offer, but always in simple, and small doses.  The larger themes tend to be the primordial good versus evil, with very fixed concepts of what good and evil actually are, but the games tend to focus on those smaller towns, and their more intimate storylines.  That, in many ways, gives me a greater sense of meaning and connection to each and every place visited, and the storylines of the various NPCs.

 

There's the fact that every single DQ has slowly grown.  It's not trying to reinvent the wheel.  Rather it's like a good car company, that knows it has a good product.  It doesn't fix what isn't broken.  It tweaks it.  Maybe one element is removed for one game, and shows up a few games later.  Maybe another element is added in, to see how well the product runs, looks, feels, but it never once strives to be something different from what it is.  It appreciates itself, and this shows with each game.  I guess what I'm trying to say is, Dragon Quest is to videogames what ice cream is to desert.  What a grilled cheese sandwich shared with your mum on a cold night, and then some hot cocoa afterwards is to food.  It's simple, good, clean fun.  It's intuitive to enjoy.  I don't have to think about whether I like it or not.  I don't HAVE to think about whether I want to delve deeper into the game or not.  It's something I naturally enjoy (I just like to delve deeper).

 

It's like coming home.  I can rest easy knowing the next game will still be Dragon Quest, no matter what is tweaked, no matter what is added, what is removed, or even what alternative gameplay is used for a new offshoot of the series.  The sounds, the graphics, the way the stories unfold, the feel, the gameplay elements.  It's all Dragon Quest all the time.  I can always relax and just...play.

 

- Alexander Langella

-----------------------------

Mattcraft:

Dragon Quest is a nostalgia road-trip to the days of old. Where RPGs did not hold your hand, but instead backstabbed you every time you saw a silvery smile.

 

That's what it is to me.

-----------------------------

Woodus:

For me it is mainly storyline and nostalgia, for some reason DQ stories draw me in more that
other series, cannot really explain why. I always have to talk to everyone in every town, and
usually do multiple times to see if they have an new information for me. I played Zork, Eye of
the Beholder, King's Quest series on the PC back then, but nothing had me looking forward to a
new game like Dragon Quest did.  Well I must have enjoyed the series, I started this site
almost 20 years ago ;)

-----------------------------

solo:

Dragon quest is my life without it i will never get to my goal and might never make my dream
come true so i will see to that the newer generations get to know dq i feel like it is my duty

------------------------------

Motdrafin:

The Dragon Quest series holds some of my favorite games. They all have their own charm, with
fun gameplay, nice characters, story, and art style. The Dragon Quest series has helped
introduced me to other JRPG series too, and started my appreciation towards this genre- which
quickly became my favorite one! The series has also gotten me through long car rides and boring
days, which rapidly became fun right when I heard the title screen's fanfare. Thank you Dragon
Quest!

-------------------------------

But_Thou_Must:

"What does DQ mean to you?"

 
To me, Dragon Quest is the quintessential console RPG. It may not have been the first RPG ever
or the first electronic RPG. However, its spot in video game history lies in how it brought the
genre to the general gaming community. It streamlined the technical aspects of Dungeons and
Dragons and presented it in a colorful world with recognizable characters and monsters. It also
inspired other popular console RPG series such as Final Fantasy and Pokémon (with Dragon Quest
V's monster recruitment system).

 

The series has a solid development team that, like the games themselves, has stayed consistent
since day 1. Horii's storytelling engages the player to keep advancing the plot, especially in
Dragon Quest IV and V. Toriyama's monster designs are simplistic but also instantly recognizable
to any fan of the series. Sugiyama's classical soundtrack captures the essence of music: making
the listener feel something (whether that be accomplishment, sadness, shock, or suspense) and
bringing out the human side in people.

 

I love how Dragon Quest's simple, intuitive gameplay has been mostly consistent throughout the
series since game 1, but with innovations along the way such as multiple party members, class
changing, monster recruitment and training, and many others. The gameplay is also a source of
relieving stress for me; there's nothing quite like hearing the signature "level-up" jingle
after defeating metals!

---------------------------------

Geon:

Dragon Quest III (GBC) was the first DQ game, and RPG, that I ever played. Being very young and
having no experience in the genre, I was terrible at it - so bad I could never get off the first
 continent. That only pushed me on though, and added to the fun. With time I learned of more DQ
games and enjoyed experiencing each one.

 

Dragon Quest is one of my favourite gaming franchises, and one that I can buy into with faith
of any new game release. The formula is fun and consistent, while the spin off games always
manage to also capture my interest. The universe of DQ is a very familiar place, and seeing it
again and again, with new stories to be told every time is a joy. Playing a new DQ game is a
strange mix of nostalgia for all that's come before it, while a refreshing new experience with
a new story, and possibly new mechanics or functionality. Not having any releases here in the
West as of late has served to remind me just how much I love the series, and how much I miss it.

--------------------------------

Rezca:

Hnmm... I probably won't be able to write up a huge detailed post, but the DQ series was one of
the earliest games I played in my childhood. I came across a magazine article that had a short
gameplay guide for Dragon Warrior I on the gameboy, and I asked my parents to get it for me. I
loved both games a great deal, spending most of my time playing the second game and imagining
about all these wonderful looking creatures and places. When Dragon Warrior 3 rolled around, I
got it the day it was released. It has to be one of my all time favorite games, and still is.

I never got the chance to play Terry's Wonderland, but I played the heck out of Tara's
Adventure, still play it today even (Admittedly on an emulator, since I lost the cartridge for
Tara's a few years back urfh..). Most of my early and middle childhood was taken up by Dragon
Quest. I never got the chance to play the original DQ/DW games past IV, though I saw
advertisements for them on the Playstation and whatnot.

 

So I'd say it's a large and important part of my childhood, since Dragon Warrior 2 and 3, as
well as the second Monsters installment, were some of my most cherished games and influenced a
lot of my writing and artwork through elementary and middle school.

----------------------------------

CoarseDragon:

DQ to me means adventure, interesting characters, great stories and the chance to help a world
survive. But more than that DQ gives a sense of fulfillment in that you can conquer fear of the
unknown (the characters that is) and have a chance to enhance your own feelings about helping
others in your world, even if there is no reward.

-------------------------------------

Charski:

I'll first start off by saying that I got into the Dragon Quest games when IX first came out, I
ended up getting it as a last-minute Christmas present. When I first played it the puns threw me
off big-time, but I wanted to pull through since it was a Christmas present and I had to show
that I like it. I ended up later liking the game's writing so much because it had such an
EarthBound feel (which was inspired by Dragon Quest). I began to like all the puns and quirky
English writing of the game and once I got past that I ended up finding IX to be an amazing
experience, I compared it to a game like Skyrim or Fallout considering how big and how much
there was to do in it. I eventually decided to play through all of them after having such an
amazing time with IX. I later made it up to playing IV and by around that time, Dragon Quest X
was announced. I couldn't wait to play more Dragon Quest.

 

As I thought three years ago.

 

Ever since then there have been multiple releases of X on different platforms, and a ton of 3DS
games that are currently not released outside of Japan. I just thought to myself "Why aren't
they releasing these games? There were still a steady release of games before X and the 3DS
games so why stop now?" It really bothers me that I get into this series just for it to fall
in localisation limbo once I got into the Dragon Quest games. It's really obvious to everyone
around me how much this bothers me. Just when I found out Dragon Quest was good everything just
stopped. I continually hope for Dragon Quest X's release, hoping that it would re-create my
first-time joy with IX and to be able to show my friends just how great and enjoyable these
games are. There are the iOS/Android remakes, but most of my friends avoid playing on
smartphones and tablets.

 

So what does Dragon Quest mean to me?

 

Dragon Quest IX was a game that made me realise I needed to think more openly about video
games, and not to be dismissal of some games at first glance. Thanks to Dragon Quest IX I've
gotten into more games like Fire Emblem, Minecraft, and many other titles that I would usually
act negative towards because I simply never got the joy of it. Dragon Quest was a big help in
trying to break my selective video game border, and I show my best to support a franchise that
had changed the way I approached playing video games. I went from enjoying games to trying to
find absolute adoration in what each individual game can offer. It's why I loved playing the
Dragon Quest games. Each and every single one of them always tried something new, whether it
was marriage in V, or the classes of III, all of these games stand out on their own while still
being a Dragon Quest games. These games are truly special, and I really wonder why I looked
over Dragon Quest.

 

Dragon Quest helped me broaden my horizon of gaming, because of how different it was from most
games and how each game [Dragon Quest and most other games] is always a unique experience.

 

That is how much Dragon Quest means to me, and that is what Dragon Quest means to me.

---------------------------------------

Megalosaro:


Not really a simple question. I've been a Dragon Quest fan for so long that it doesn't mean the
same thing to me now that it did when I first started playing.

I was a kid when I first started the series. I didn't really know much about anything back then.
But the stories of each game taught me a lot. The characters exemplify very real themes: doing
good for the sake of doing good, loyality, unwavering bravery. Some would say that these games
are too simple, but for me I always looked up to their mythic portrayal of right and wrong.

As an adult, I relish these games because of that. The moral ambiguities that arise from
dealing with the adult world are tiring, so it is relaxing to go back and experience something
so innocent and pure. I am glad that Dragon Quest has never abandoned that tenant.

Furthermore, my appreciation for the Dragon Quest series has shaped my aesthetic tastes. I
doubt I would have learned, piano if it weren't for Sugiyama's music, for example.


---------------------------------------

Deforestater:

DRagon Quest is a safe haven for when I want to experience a fun game and fun characters.
Dragon Quest IV is my favorite because you get to know your party before you get the hero

-----------------------------------------

Sneers:

"What does Dragon Quest mean to you?"

 Well this will take awhile I hope you are sitting down, and are comfortable. Dragon Quest to
me is not just any old game, it is my childhood to my adult life. It all started when I had a
subscription to Nintendo's Fan Club before Nintendo Power came out. On release of Nintendo's
first Nintendo Power magazine which came with the Nintendo Fan Club subscription, I was sent a
copy of Dragon Warrior. Now at the time I wasn't really into RPGs, but was starting to get
into them such as Bard's Tale and Might and Magic. When that cartridge came to my house,
history was written.

From pressing the Power button on the first day, I was hooked instantly. It reminded me of
Ultima but with a more linear goal, and a lot less headache. My childhood would never be the
same again from this point on for the better. After completing DW1 I could not wait for the
next installment of the series. Kept reading about it in Nintendo Power, and was getting
extremely excited. No other game could compare at the time, except for maybe Zelda and Metroid.

Once DW2 came out I was living, eating, breathing, and enjoying DW as much as possible. I even
got my family hooked namely my uncle. He was playing the first game as I was venturing through
the tough second one. Though the game was 100x harder than the first for me, the party aspects
and the over all more open world put me in awe as though I was mesmerized anytime I looked at
the screen. Completed 2 and the wait begins again, and though I completed the game I sat down
gridning until I was max level with everyone out of sheer boredom to wait for 3.

Oh man 3... where do I begin with 3... At this moment 3 to me hands down was the best of the
Loto Trilogy. Create your own characters, run them through a vast world of light and dark, and
end up in the world of DW1 where the story continues to DW1. I would skip school, pretend I was
sick, do whatever it took to play DW3, it was my drug. Though it was bad choices back then, I
still do not regret it to this day.

And now for the Zenithian Series, oh man what a twist. Playing multiple stories only to end up
all meeting at the end. I will be honest at first I did not care for this game for many reasons. The small storylines made it seem as though it wasn't one game but many small stories which at first I hated. But when I found out the real story began once you meet the Hero with everyone, my mind was blown. Very awesome tactic and definitely pulled me in. By this time FF was also well into it's 4th game ( 2 for us ) and I was conflicted for FF4 was my favorite FF of all time. But even so DW/DQ held something in my heart.

Now for the heartache, and the determination of a handsdown DW fan. No 5 or 6 came out... I
was devistated, though I seen the game pictures in gaming magazines, I would never play them I
thought. Until one day on DQ5's release date in Japan, we had a local Japanese game store
around teh corner from us. I popped in saw no Dragon Warrior 5, but I did notice a game that
looked similar but was called Dragon Quest 5. I asked the clerk what is that he told me it is
Dragon Warrior 5 but is really know as Dragon Quest. My heart sank, in the good way. I begged
and dropped all my allowence into the pricy $155 brand new cart. Not even knowing a lick of
Japanese I did not care for I held the best damn DQ game in history in my hands.

As time went on and I was getting stuck due to language barriers, I went to our local Japanese
Mall which had a bookstore in it. And holy crap did they have the best damn selection of
gaming guides ever. Thumnbing through them all I found the holy grail for 550 Yen which is
around $6 ( damn cheap for a full on guide with maps and unique art ) I had the power to beat
DQ5 without knowing anything about the story. Showed exactly step by step where to go, what
level to be there , and showed detail maps of everything towns, and dungeons. Within a month I
have bested DQ5, and damn proud to say I am probably the only American on launch day , who
cannot read or understand Japanese has beaten DQ5.

Time moves on, and sadly that store never got DQ6 for lack of sales of 5. Also sadly I did not
own a PS1 so I was not blessed to play DQ7. But I will have to say 8, and 9 are great add ons
later in life.

So what is DQ to me? 30 best damn years of my life hands down, and continued to be so. I just
hope to god they bring 10 here, playing an online version of the best damn RPG ever to hit the
states would be fulfilling to me. My daughter is also very knowledgeable of DQ, I have started
her young. She has played 9, not beaten it but got to the whale which to me is damn good for
her age. Anyways SEI if you are reading this, take this from a long term fan who has been
there since day 1. Whatever title comes out from Japan, Online or not, should definitely bring
to the states. Because as you can see, it is not just a game but a livelihood.

Thank you for your time,

Robert 'Sneers' Dryburgh
rpgrapture@gmail.com

--------------------------------

Hoshino22:

What does Dragon Quest mean to me?

 

That's a kind of hard question to answer...Dragon Quest may not have been the first game that
I played, but it was the first game I played that held meaning to me other then gameplay.
Other then what was just on the surface. The first game series I would replay over and over
and get 100% every single time and still love it. Even when I play some of the games I can't
understand there is something there that interests me... That keeps me coming back. It's quite
hard to describe and pretty unbelievable so let me put it this way: Dragon Quest was the first
game that spoke to me in more ways then just with gameplay. The first game that I took every
opportunity to talk to random civilians to figure out exactly what was going on in the story
and loved every second I took that small detour because it meant something.

 

The first Dragon Quest game I played was, surprisingly, Rocket Slime. That tiny game you can
get 100% on pretty easily. The tank battles were amusing and fun, but once again, it was just
gameplay to me. The characters were interesting, but I wanted to play the game not experience
it. The second was another side-game, Dragon Quest Monsters Joker. Rather amusingly, the first
X rank monster I worked hard towards was Mortamor. A demonic looking creature that I had no
idea what it even was the first time I looked at it, but it intrigued me so I eventually
synthesized it. This was the first game that spoke to me more then gameplay, because when I
saw Mortamor I wanted to know what it was. When was it created? How did they get the idea for
this bizarre creature? And I found it out and played my first actual Dragon Quest game, Dragon
Quest VI. I love all Dragon Quest games, but Dragon Quest VI spoke to me the most. Now that
may just be because it was the first real Dragon Quest game I played, but regardless, it was
the first game I really felt everything that was happening. I ran through the game once and was
pretty confused, to tell the truth. But after the second and third run-through, I loved how
every piece of every puzzle had a place. After that game, I played Dragon Quest IV. What stood
out to me about this game was its characters. Each one really developed as time went on and the
result was a very realistic and life-like experience. I died quite frequently on later bosses,
but every time I came back I tried something different. And eventually, I would prevail and I
would celebrate and really feel excited. I felt outright rage towards Aamon for what he had
done, I have hated characters in video games, but never before had I really felt rage. Felt
like the truth was unfair, like something needed to come at Aamon and punish him for
what he had done.

 

Dragon Quest V was next, followed by Dragon Quest IX, Dragon Quest VIII, Dragon Quest
Monsters Joker 2. Each one of these games held special meaning to me, and I never wanted to
put them down, but eventually it was over. There were no more games-no more experiences.
These games really helped me become the woman I am today, but they were gone now. I, of
course, imported many of them to play, but without the ability to understand them it really
hindered the experience. You have no idea what I would give to experience that feeling again,
but for the time I would just have to play the ones I owned... I would have to attempt to
translate the ones I couldn't understand. But when I heard Dragon Quest Heroes was being
localized... When I heard Square Enix said that the Western Dragon Quest fans have a bright
future, I was given hope again! That feeling of a light piercing through the darkness... It
was overpowering.

 

Is this what Dragon Quest means to me?

 

This is closer to how Dragon Quest makes me feel. What it has done to me. But what does
Dragon Quest mean to me?

 

 

 

Everything.

------------------------------

Sneers:

"What does Dragon Quest mean to you?"

Well this will take awhile I hope you are sitting down, and are comfortable. Dragon Quest to me is not just any old game, it is my childhood to my adult life. It all started when I had a subscription to Nintendo's Fan Club before Nintendo Power came out. On release of Nintendo's first Nintendo Power magazine which came with the Nintendo Fan Club subscription, I was sent a copy of Dragon Warrior. Now at the time I wasn't really into RPGs, but was starting to get into them such as Bard's Tale and Might and Magic. When that cartridge came to my house, history was written.

From pressing the Power button on the first day, I was hooked instantly. It reminded me of Ultima but with a more linear goal, and a lot less headache. My childhood would never be the same again from this point on for the better. After completing DW1 I could not wait for the next installment of the series. Kept reading about it in Nintendo Power, and was getting extremely excited. No other game could compare at the time, except for maybe Zelda and Metroid.

Once DW2 came out I was living, eating, breathing, and enjoying DW as much as possible. I even got my family hooked namely my uncle. He was playing the first game as I was venturing through the tough second one. Though the game was 100x harder than the first for me, the party aspects and the over all more open world put me in awe as though I was mesmerized anytime I looked at the screen. Completed 2 and the wait begins again, and though I completed the game I sat down gridning until I was max level with everyone out of sheer boredom to wait for 3.

Oh man 3... where do I begin with 3... At this moment 3 to me hands down was the best of the Loto Trilogy. Create your own characters, run them through a vast world of light and dark, and end up in the world of DW1 where the story continues to DW1. I would skip school, pretend I was sick, do whatever it took to play DW3, it was my drug. Though it was bad choices back then, I still do not regret it to this day.

And now for the Zenithian Series, oh man what a twist. Playing multiple stories only to end up all meeting at the end. I will be honest at first I did not care for this game for many reasons. The small storylines made it seem as though it wasn't one game but many small stories which at first I hated. But when I found out the real story began once you meet the Hero with everyone, my mind was blown. Very awesome tactic and definitely pulled me in. By this time FF was also well into it's 4th game ( 2 for us ) and I was conflicted for FF4 was my favorite FF of all time. But even so DW/DQ held something in my heart.

Now for the heartache, and the determination of a handsdown DW fan. No 5 or 6 came out... I was devistated, though I seen the game pictures in gaming magazines, I would never play them I thought. Until one day on DQ5's release date in Japan, we had a local Japanese game store around teh corner from us. I popped in saw no Dragon Warrior 5, but I did notice a game that looked similar but was called Dragon Quest 5. I asked the clerk what is that he told me it is Dragon Warrior 5 but is really know as Dragon Quest. My heart sank, in the good way. I begged and dropped all my allowence into the pricy $155 brand new cart. Not even knowing a lick of Japanese I did not care for I held the best damn DQ game in history in my hands.

As time went on and I was getting stuck due to language barriers, I went to our local Japanese Mall which had a bookstore in it. And holy crap did they have the best damn selection of gaming guides ever. Thumnbing through them all I found the holy grail for 550 Yen which is around $6 ( damn cheap for a full on guide with maps and unique art ) I had the power to beat DQ5 without knowing anything about the story. Showed exactly step by step where to go, what level to be there , and showed detail maps of everything towns, and dungeons. Within a month I have bested DQ5, and damn proud to say I am probably the only American on launch day , who cannot read or understand Japanese has beaten DQ5.

Time moves on, and sadly that store never got DQ6 for lack of sales of 5. Also sadly I did not own a PS1 so I was not blessed to play DQ7. But I will have to say 8, and 9 are great add ons later in life.

So what is DQ to me? 30 best damn years of my life hands down, and continued to be so. I just hope to god they bring 10 here, playing an online version of the best damn RPG ever to hit the states would be fulfilling to me. My daughter is also very knowledgeable of DQ, I have started her young. She has played 9, not beaten it but got to the whale which to me is damn good for her age. Anyways SEI if you are reading this, take this from a long term fan who has been there since day 1. Whatever title comes out from Japan, Online or not, should definitely bring to the states. Because as you can see, it is not just a game but a livelihood.

Thank you for your time,

-------------------------------

RaxusCarnelli:

Well, I've said it already, and I know it's been seen, but I feel guilty for putting it in the
wrong place. But to me, Dragon Quest means perfection. Every Dragon Quest game I've ever
played is superb, regardless of whether or not I've finished it. The monsters are well
designed with comically pathetic enemies like the world famous slimes mixed in with menacing
horrors like the final bosses. The characters are easy to become attached to, especially
Abel, the main protagonist from Dragon Quest V (Well I heard he's supposed to be called Abel).
And it features gameplay across all sorts of different genres: Standard JRPGs, Monster
Collecting, Platforming, Real Time Strategy, and Hack n' Slash (in both 3rd and 1st person).
There's an omnipresent, undeniable, and always appreciated charm about the games. And above
all else, it remains consistent in design from game to game (well, as far as character design
goes). In short, Dragon Quest, means RPG greatness to me, and I hope that Square Enix will
realize that fans in the west are sorely missing these games.

------------------------------

Dog of Zahan:

Dragon Quest, or Dragon Warrior, as I knew it in the formative years of my life, means my introduction to a new type of video game, a type of game I grew to love more and more through the years. If not for Dragon Quest, my time in my favorite hobby would have been far different.

 The early games sparked my imagination in ways not even the action RPGs like Zelda of the day could do. The game's initial limitations were it's strengths to me. the text descriptions of actions of still characters left me to fill in the gaps. The quasi-shakespearean dialog of the first two games of the series felt authentic to the realm of knights and wizards it was portraying, and made me feel smarter for reading it. The idea of growing stronger with time, and the sense of travelling far away lands filled with danger was thrilling and empowering in a way few other games I'd played matched. I had before only played Mario games, where characters moments of power were fleeting and impermanent. Dragon Warrior opened to me a world where a new and permanent increase in ability was just one bridge, or mountain range, or cave away, and only my patience, and my strategic mind could get me there. It was a quest for my mind more than my thumbs and it produced in me a thoughtful, intelligent man out of an imaginative, dreaming boy. A boy who would attempt to create a home made board game to recapture the essence of Dragon Warrior, without even ever having heard the terms d20 or Gary Gygax. Dragon Warrior had me attempting to make a paperback RPG in my own home before I even knew what they were!

As I grew into that thoughtful man, the games I loved grew up with me, as the saga continued in parts 2, 3, and 4. The sense of continuity and growth of story in Dragon Warrior's opening trilogy was something I'd never seen before, and has grown into the sprawling epics in storytelling we know today. Dragon Warrior 4 was not connected to them in sense but theme and number, but the unique bend on storytelling with several chapters devoted to the many friends your named character would make throughout his or her adventure was something I'd never seen before or since.

The Dragon Quest series left me for several years after that, as Enix hit hard times in the 90's, but I never left it. when it returned in the 2000's and beyond, I have been impressed and a loyal follower of nearly every new adventure ever since.

To make a long story short, what does Dragon Quest mean to me? It means roots. MY roots as a gamer, and in some ways, as an imaginative person.


-------------------------------

redneckpride4ever:

A purely fun game experience. The turn based system crushes action based and ATB systems. The
art style and music are miles above the competition. It holds my interest like no other
series- and is the only game series where grinding is addictive as opposed to a chore.

 
Pure euphoria.

 

 

Thank you to everyone who submitted!

 

Now, for the second step in the project...

 

Fan art submissions!

 

I'm not going to leave this one open as long as the other one because I don't expect to get as much fan art.

 

This step is all about fan art! Create submissions that show the lovable characters of DQ, the monsters, the lands, or anything else! Then submit them here for the project!

 

Even if you didn't submit an answer to the question, please feel free to send in fan art! It doesn't have to be made specifically for this project, but it must be related to Dragon Quest. In other words, feel free to submit art you've made in the past.

 

Deadline for fan art submissions is 11:59 EST on April 24th 2015! That gives you a solid two weeks.

 

Thanks! I look forward to the submissions!

Edited by gooieooie

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Deadline for fan art submissions is 11:59 EST on April 14th, 2015! That gives you a solid two weeks.

 

Uhm, that is in 3 days heh. HURRY RUSH YOUR ART!!!!  :P

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You mean the 25th of April ;).

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Okay, this is really embarrassing, but here's some fanart of the Dragonlord that I cooked up last night. I don't know anything about shading, just so you know.

Dragonlord_zpsbacwywo9.png

  • Upvote 1

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My sneaky attempt at not updating failed to draw in more entries. Bah :P

 

I'm going to extend the deadline to 11:59 EST on May 6th, 2015! I hope to get a few more.

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Alright, looks like I won't be seeing any more submissions in the art department.

 

Look forward to the next step, coming soon!

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Alright, everyone! Time for the third step!

 

This time, it's another text-based submission! I realized that, while you guys were submitting to what the series meant to you, it isn't telling Square Enix exactly what you want (even though it's clear).

 

So now is time for the convincing! Tell Square Enix: Why should they localize the games? Give them any reasons you've got! Got statistics? Got an idea on how they could do it? Now's the time to tell them! Granted, I know some people already did this in their earlier submissions, but this is a focused submission period on it.

 

These will be due June 5th, 2015 at 11:59pm, Eastern Standard Time. Get cracking!

Edited by gooieooie

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I'll try to convey this as concisely and simply as I can (10 page minimum!).  Platty, anytime you're ready for translating!

 

 

To the employees at Square-Enix,

 

I hereby pledge to purchase Dragon Quest VII and Dragon Quest X.  This may seem like empty words, and may be ignored entirely for just playing part and parcel to a campaign that, while recognized, has amounted to no direct action that assures myself and others, that our demands are being considered and met.  Yet I promised the same for the original Operation Rainfall campaign, and not only did I pledge to purchase all three of those Wii RPG's, Xenoblade Chronicles, The Last Story, and Pandora's Tower, but I actually did purchase them, each a new purchase, each counting towards the official release totals.  Should you require proof, I still have those receipts.  The barest of hints in both discussing the games chances, and the shift over time from what seems like a definite no, to a possibility, to a desire to release, are not the same as actual teasers and statements indicating a game is coming.  I may believe it is, but that is all I have, a belief, nothing concrete.

 

I do not pledge just because I want to see these games come out for myself.  I pledge so that others may have the chance to immerse themselves in these same worlds that I wish to.  I pledge because I know that Dragon Quest has always proven itself as saleable if it's marketed.  I pledge because Dragon Quest IX sold roughly the same number of units as Dragon Quest VIII in the US, my country, and perhaps more over time, and yet sold itself purely on its own merits.  There was no Final Fantasy XII demo pack-in to help push numbers.  I pledge because I know this series has potential, and if properly backed, and if properly and carefully handled, can be built up to a substantial fanbase.  I pledge because the game series known as Dragon Quest is a charming, intuitive, fun romp of an RPG series with far deeper messages and hidden elements for those who wish to search for them and far deeper gameplay than is shown on the surface for those who look for such details.  Meaning it is a series that can relate to just about anyone.  Parents, children, teachers, the guy building that apartment building, the artist in his downtime in his studio, the student in between mind numbingly intense homework assignments, everyone.

 

So why Dragon Quest VII and X specifically?  Why not just be content with Dragon Quest Heroes, the future Dragon Quest XI, and maybe Dragon Quest VIII 3DS, as, while unannounced at the time of this writing, is surely a shoe-in for an international release?  I choose these to start with because they are worthy titles.

 

Dragon Quest VII on the Playstation was a game I initially hated.  Oh, I detested it at first.  I felt the game was slow, boring, poorly paced, and had so many classes that would take forever to tackle mastering, that I could not touch the game after finally reaching Dharma.  It would be a year later that I would return, and start a new game, with a fresh mindset.  I was ready to play, and I loved it.  Everything I hated about it, I found I actually enjoyed.  Time has passed, and since that second replay, I've beaten the game over 8x.  Yes, that's right, 8x.  My average game is about 240hours.  I should note that I had several girlfriends in that time, two jobs, I took care of my own affairs, helped my sister, was a freelance network technician, helped friends and colleagues with writing, wrote and destroyed two books (I didn't like the ending), and played many other games.  My excuse is I did not sleep much, but then I usually don't need more than 4 hours.

 

My point is that Dragon Quest VII on the Playstation IS my favourite game of all time.  I'm not coming at this with nostalgic lenses either.  I've replayed it recently, along with playing many other recent games from all genres, though I tend to prefer RPG's.  Even comparing it to other Dragon Quest games, VII is easily my favourite of all time, and over time it has grown on me.  The thing is, what Dragon Quest VII was to me then, on the Playstation, is VASTLY improved in the current 3DS version today.  Oh, I am fully aware of all the changes.  I write faqs, so I tend to read a lot of Japanese sites, as well as take notes on what other gamers have experienced, and spent plenty of time watching videos.  Sure, none of this is the same as actually playing it, but I've a knack of knowing if I'll enjoy a game or not through research.  It's not just that I know I would enjoy this, but that others would as well.

 

Dragon Quest VII 3DS is very forward thinking, much like Dragon Quest IX is, and the same can be said for Dragon Quest X.  Both X and VII even build off of, and from all accounts, improve upon the ideas they borrowed from IX.  This is where Dragon Quest has always shined.  It tinkers and improves.  All ideas constantly rehashed and refined to a better, more palatable, and often a far more enjoyable version of the same system.  In this Horii is a genius, and in this does Dragon Quest VII 3DS truly shine.  It fixes EVERYTHING that most new players to the DQ franchise, and most new videogame players in general would take issue with in the PSX version.  It streamlines the game.  Makes if faster, flashier but without too much flash, just enough to satisfy and drive that desire for more.  Sure, I am sad at the loss of the lengthy beginning, but this renders it a whole new experience.  The added NPC's, the new dungeon, the special lithographs, the revamped township, the reworked and streamlined vocation system, the new special game that works like Tombola in DQ5, but offers substantially better prizes at all levels, and even the new equipment are just fantastic touches that will keep both old and new gamers alike satisfied and wanting more.  That's not the best, nor the most enticing part.  Dragon Quest VII has the honour, in my opinion, of having the most amazing overall soundtrack, and to have this in full orchestral sound is an improvement nothing short of a WOW factor for existing fans.  For new fans, and new gamers, the world map being somewhat of a cross between the super expansive world of 8, and the overhead, cozier, and more lush and detailed world of 9 makes that exploration factor of Dragon Quest really stand out.  It just draws a player in to see and know what's around any corner.  The ability to pick and choose what enemies to fight, and when to fight makes it more thrilling as the party dodges and weaves to the desired enemy, or in the act of simply avoiding all battles to carry forward the story.

 

Dragon Quest VII 3DS does for players of the original what Dragon Warrior III GBC and the Dragon Quest III iOS/Android did for players of the original NES.  It's a refreshing take on an old classic.  A brand new adventure that will clearly differentiate itself from the original game.  It stands out as the pinnacle of what "remake" is supposed to entail: keep the core the same, alter the way the story is experienced, and the player unfolds, while still keeping that Dragon Quest charming adventurous feeling.  For new players, it will hit all those spots that entice, keep them occupied, but don't require as much time and effort at any given moment, allowing them to put the game down and comfortable come back to it later.

 

Dragon Quest VII 3DS is an easy sell.  You just have to market it smartly.  Not through ridiculously expensive TV ads, but through smart, cheaper, and sharp adds that really entice players to want to see what DQ is all about, and what DQ7 has to offer.  Do this, and I promise you, the players will buy the game.  Let them know it's present, and they'll come.  Oh, the famished 3DS gamers have been wont for a new RPG, and one that is WORTH their time and money.  This is one of those games.  Why not give it to the players?  Let the fans who pay attention, the fans who need to be reminded, and those who are yet to be fans know that you not only want to assure the release of quality games, but that you KNOW this is a quality game.

 

So I've told you what you need to hear about Dragon Quest X, and while I wish I could say everything that is needed, or could be said, I have to keep this relatively succinct.   So what about Dragon Quest X?  Why do I feel this title is worthwhile in a market filled with MMORPGs?  I suppose the question in regards to an already saturated market is...how did Apple sell the iPod in a market saturated to the brim with thousands upon thousands of music player options, most of which offered superior quality audio due to the low quality of mp3's, which the ipod offered?  Yet they did.  They created a base for the iPod because the iPod distinguished itself.  It was unique amongst its competitors.  It offered a way of carrying music on the go, in a simple package, that was sold as something that every customer wanted, but never knew they did.  Well, that's what Dragon Quest X is to MMORPGs.

 

MMORPGs are a dime a dozen, or so one would think.  Sheer volume and number of game choices smothers the truth that most are just copies of one another.  The commonly copied games are WoW, EverQuest, Asheron's Call, Lineage, or Ragnarok Online (which is copied for its cutesy art style, while the battle system is typically EverQuest or Lineage based).  The few standouts are either trashed by their owners, such as Maple Story, frightening away as many existing players as it draws in new blood due to poorly implemented cash-shop systems that remove the value of hard-won equipment and stocking up on items, or they're so overly complex as to only capture a rare few, such as EVE Online.  That's where Dragon Quest X will shine.  It's simple, charming, has a ton of options, is single AND group friendly (this, on its own, is unique outside of Phantasy Star Online) without needing overpowered weapons, has a flexible and easy to use, and apparently fun, quest system that is an upgrade to what DQ IX did, has a large, but not overly vast overworld system, and a host of other small, nuanced, and fun features, including a crafting system that's a combination of Final Fantasy XI's crafting system and Dragon Quest VIII and IX's alchemy system.

 

It has charm and simplicity that will make parents feel at ease for their kids, which retaining that hidden sophistication that any adult can dig their teeth into, for those who like story.  The design is fun, enjoyable, and while not everyone is a fan of Toriyama's art, this is the exception, not the rule.  The artistic style is friendly and distinct amongst its competitors.  Sure there's a Dragon Ball Z MMO, but it is relatively small and unknown in the US.  It just appeals to everyone.  It's battle system is fast paced, and due to the nature of the party and mercenary system, anyone can play at their own leisurely pace without needing to worry about the intensity of guild responsibility, and for those who WANT that, well, the game certainly doesn't stop players from pursuing their experiences in that fashion.

 

The point is, Dragon Quest X offers a unique experience in a market filled with copy-cats.  An experience that connects to players who like simple MMO's, and even ones who like games with more depth, as there are MANY options that fill in those gaps, and the nature of the battle and skill point system offers tremendous customization without being overwhelming and overly complex.  So it's a nice middle road.  It offers fun and ease of play for the young, and allows adults to play at their own pace.  It's whimsical character designs aren't over the top, and so will cater to those who enjoy anime-style, but will not turn off people who cannot stand it.  It's charm and adventure/exploration based gameplay, and the unique style of world and story will let players of all types immerse themselves on any level they feel like, while enjoying the simple act of a stroll outside of town, or hunting down monsters for necessary ingredients.  Monster hunter fans alike can get into this game, just due to the crafting elements.  I mean, it has something for everyone, but most importantly, for those who have played it, and I've spoken to and read much commentary, nothing ever feels forced.  It's just good clean fun in an MMO package.

 

I haven't even scratched the surface on specific battle gameplay elements inherent to the battle and hiring system, or the special job systems that just appeal to all sorts of gamers.  Or even the special enemy invasions I hear about now and again.  I mean who doesn't want an active world, or a world that feels like stuff is happening in it outside of the player starting up a new quest and entering a new instance dungeon?  Not many.

 

There isn't any direct competition to a game that offers the full package, ease of play, and general charm and fun that Dragon Quest X does.  Some offer some elements, others offer none of them.  It really does appeal to a very wide and diverse audience.  Sure there is no way to be sure of success, so there are a few options and approaches for a cheaper and easier beginning.

 

The core cost issue over time, is the servers.  So why not just start off with Japanese only servers.  Let the NA and EU players connect through to Japan, and if numbers build up, there's obviously an audience, then consider a server shift and opening NA and EU, or just NA servers for NA/EU players.  If it's not that successful, then keep the connection through the Japanese servers until it is.  The money for continued English updates will be easy to make up with even a small fanbase this way, and if it grows, as I know it likely will, then the profits will just skyrocket.

 

I've played a LOT of MMO's over the years.  Mostly Korean, but it is not like Japan and Asia aren't saturated as well, and from experience, I know how many players think, especially as they get older and want a more fun and relaxed game.  DQX offers this more than most other offerings in the western world.  The potential is great.  I suggest taking advantage.

 

Thank you, and seriously consider this.  Just remember the series needs to be grown, like a plant.  A little water at first, but slowly rebuild, and you'll find a fruit bearing tree in the series, and these two games offer some of the best quality food to regrow that sapling.

 

- Alexander Langella

  • Upvote 3

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Amazing submission! Added.


Also FYI, if your name has an (a) next to it on the submission list, it means that it hasn't yet been added to my main list, which I will do when I get on my computer.

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Platnotes version:

 

Dear Squeenix, please bring DQVII and DQX to the US. There's data to support you doing so & making money off of old and new fans of all ages, and lots of good things could follow after.

Edited by Plattym3
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If you want. It's the short & non-sweeter version of Iggy's.

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Platnotes version:

 

Dear Squeenix, please bring DQVII and DQIX to the US. There's data to support you doing so & making money off of old and new fans of all ages, and lots of good things could follow after.

I'd like to point out that we already have DQIX here...

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Damn. I've been typing DQIX so much lately as I get back into it and look stiff up that my custom keyboard automatically switched that. D'oh.

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On a computer now, added Ignasia's to my main list and removed the (a) from the list. Let's get some more submissions!

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So gooie, did you send the email, and did you receive any response?

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Sorry, I got a bit busy and haven't been able to update yet. I still need to compile everything together before it e-mails, and also look for other people to e-mail it. I'd like other people to send it in as well, so they see multiple versions. That makes it harder to ignore, and would show the anount of people that wanted to send it off. 

 

If anyone else would like to send this off to SE, post here, but I'll start the official "Step 5: People to e-mail SE" in the coming days.

 

Thanks for your patience, everyone!

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So what, we just copy/paste it to an email and send it off? I can do that.

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Gooieooie, how are we looking?

 

I'm going to email the heck out of this thing.  I say you should post it all to either a website, or to a page here, finalized, on the Den, if Woodus is willing to support that and code for it.  Maybe create the link for it here, or better yet, create a new topic, call it something like:

 

The Fan Post/Tweet/Email push of "What Does DQ Mean To You?"

 

Then we all push it however we want to.

 

 

If you're feeling overwhelmed, maybe ask someone for some help in compiling it and organizing it?  I believe in ya buddy.

Edited by ignasia7

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Yeah either way a topic or a page if you want me to put it there.

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Hey, thanks guys.

 

Apologies for the delay; I'm on a trip, and a family incident happened yesterday. I'll update when I return from my trip. Thanks for waiting!

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