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Any Spanish or French speakers? Or any of you speak a 2nd language?


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Buenos Dias!  Bonjour!  Guten Tag!  Buena Sera!

 

Do any of you speak a 2nd or 3rd language?  Would love to hear how you learned these languages whether you did growing up or because of extensive travel.

Edited by Madrigal
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i know a littel japanese

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i know a littel japanese

I only know a couple of Japanese words.  It's difficult, but a lot of people like Japanese which they are introduced through Animes and of course Dragon Quest games :)

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I'm fluent in Spanish as a second language. My father's side of the family almost exclusively speaks Spanish, so growing up a dual-language route was the only way to go. It was very much a trial-and-error process in learning it - practicing phrases, being corrected when a conjugation or a word was wrong, and so on. Years later, I was set to take a test in college and earn two years of foreign language credit without taking those courses - yahoo!

 

But I haven't stopped there. I consider myself a language buff. I've studied Latin, Italian, French and Russian. I don't know enough to consider myself fluent in any of those, but I can hold my own in basic conversation. If wanting to learn a second language, I'd suggest first immersing yourself in the music of the particular region/language you're wanting to learn. I have music on my iPod in 13 different languages and can sing along with most of them, even though I don't know much about the lyrics I'm singing.

 

Also studied a nifty little language referred to as Silbo Gomero (a Spanish-based, whistled language). But I can't seem to master a projective whistle - just a lyrical one. C'est la vie, I suppose.

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Spanish I've picked up quick.  My father is from Italy, but he never really taught me Italian enough to be fluent in it.  I learned a lot more when I was a teen because we spent a lot more time in Italy.  My dad's family lives in Italy and my grandmother's sister lives in south France.  So I was learning how to speak Italian and French which I'm about 50% fluent in both... but I use Spanish more since I work with a lot of people from Guatemala and Mexico who don't speak any English.

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I took 4 years of French in school. Nothing too useful, but I do recall a few phrases that might serve me well. Too bad it has to be Canadian French instead of France French. I could have pursued it farther in high school, but I chose not to because the past French classes were terrible.

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I've been trying to learn Italian for a while now. I actually learned quite a bit but it's left me after I stopped practicing.

Well I will need to brush up on my Italian if I go back over to Italy later this month.

 

 

I took 4 years of French in school. Nothing too useful, but I do recall a few phrases that might serve me well. Too bad it has to be Canadian French instead of France French. I could have pursued it farther in high school, but I chose not to because the past French classes were terrible.

Why were the past French classes horrible?  People compare French Canadian speech to American English to British English.  I have a family of friends from France that don't live far from me, so when I'm with them we only speak French.  I struggle sometimes, but that's part of learning.

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When i was five I moved from Ireland to France. In about three years i was fluent.

So I guess immersion is the best way to learn a language.

It is, that's almost how I picked up on Spanish quickly.  I live around and work with a bunch of Spanish speakers.  I do 3 Spanish and French lessons a week.  I get practice with both though.  My grandmother's sister and her family lives in Marseille.

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It would be interesting to have public results for this poll, so we could check who answered what.

 

I know Spanish as my original language.

 

I had to teach myself English by reading comics and novels, sometimes with the use of a dictionary. The classes I had during junior high and high school, while good, were still school classes, designed to make you forget everything after each test. Learning my way, I got to remember everything, because I cared for it, and I learned a more natural speech pattern than that taught at schools (if you ignore the fact I now speak like a superhero).

 

I took French classes in a specialized school. I have moderate knowledge and am still somewhat good with grammar, but I am also too slow and have to check things now and again. I suck at listenting and speaking.

 

I know some Japanese words (Kanji included for some of them). I can read Hiragana and Katakana, self taught using a guide from a magazine. I also had to teach myself not to make the mistake of substituting letters just as they are used to spell any word, since a lot of people who "know" Japanese do it. I instead looked for things written originally by Japanese, and checked how they did it.

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It would be interesting to have public results for this poll, so we could check who answered what.

 

I know Spanish as my original language.

 

I had to teach myself English by reading comics and novels, sometimes with the use of a dictionary. The classes I had during junior high and high school, while good, were still school classes, designed to make you forget everything after each test. Learning my way, I got to remember everything, because I cared for it, and I learned a more natural speech pattern than that taught at schools (if you ignore the fact I now speak like a superhero).

 

I took French classes in a specialized school. I have moderate knowledge and am still somewhat good with grammar, but I am also too slow and have to check things now and again. I suck at listenting and speaking.

 

I know some Japanese words (Kanji included for some of them). I can read Hiragana and Katakana, self taught using a guide from a magazine. I also had to teach myself not to make the mistake of substituting letters just as they are used to spell any word, since a lot of people who "know" Japanese do it. I instead looked for things written originally by Japanese, and checked how they did it.

I agree with Eal, your English is superb.  My Spanish and French are limited.  I'm stronger in Spanish than in French, my Italian used to be much better.  I can go in and make the poll public.  I'm studying verbs with direct objects in Spanish right now.  I'm getting better, I spend a lot of time listening to Spanish.  I practice conjugating verbs.  French, I go online and study as well.  My friends from France help me out a lot, they're more than happy to teach me French.  I really used to not care so much for languages when I was younger, now I do.

 

Btw - I don't know how to make the poll public now, I think you have to do it when you first create it?

Edited by Madrigal
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I grew up speaking both English and Spanish, so both are pretty fluent. I feel like I write better in English, but I find it easier to speak with Spanish speakers. This is probably because I had to speak Spanish at home and with other relatives, since they didn't know much English. Also took 2 levels of Spanish (including AP Spanish) in High School, but English was my favorite subject then.

 

Currently learning Japanese as a 3rd language. Already have the basics covered, like the Kana, basic phrases, and even some Kanji. Should be enough to hold a basic conversation, but I am not getting enough real life conversation practice to keep things fresh in my mind, and I am worried that I am forgetting some things little by little.

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I grew up speaking both English and Spanish, so both are pretty fluent. I feel like I write better in English, but I find it easier to speak with Spanish speakers. This is probably because I had to speak Spanish at home and with other relatives, since they didn't know much English. Also took 2 levels of Spanish (including AP Spanish) in High School, but English was my favorite subject then.

 

Currently learning Japanese as a 3rd language. Already have the basics covered, like the Kana, basic phrases, and even some Kanji. Should be enough to hold a basic conversation, but I am not getting enough real life conversation practice to keep things fresh in my mind, and I am worried that I am forgetting some things little by little.

I think people like you are really lucky, my father didn't speak Italian to me growing up, and since I don't speak it but once a year when I go to Italy, I don't count it because it takes me time to remember then re-learn a lot I forget.  Now I have been focusing more on Spanish and French.  Spanish because it's needed now and I have many friends who are Spanish speakers who help me. It's a great opportunity to practice.  French because I have French speaking friends, and because I just love how it sounds and think it's so beautiful.

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You're Your English is actually quite impressive. You would never be able to tell it was your second language.

Thank you, man.

 

Flute, I had already seen you before, although I think you had shorter hair then.

 

I love the way it looks on the 2013 picture where you are wearing a black shirt and stealing someone else's birthday cake.

 

Sorry, that last bit was meant for the "what do you look like" thread.

 

Too busy being mean to eal after he complimented me to notice I was on the wrong page...

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I take German in school, and I can speak and understand (not read or write) Arabic fluently. Growing up (and still now), I speak English, Arabic, and few words of French in daily conversations with my family. For German, I only really know what my teacher in school has taught me, so I'm not fluent... I hope to be someday!

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I take German in school, and I can speak and understand (not read or write) Arabic fluently. Growing up (and still now), I speak English, Arabic, and few words of French in daily conversations with my family. For German, I only really know what my teacher in school has taught me, so I'm not fluent... I hope to be someday!

I took a semester of German myself, and know a few phrases and words.  I knew more when I stayed in Switzerland for two weeks and was picking it up quickly.  I found it easy to learn.  I only know one word in Arabic and that's "Shuk-ran" Thank you.  I know a few phrases in Hindi because I know a lot of Indian people and they taught me a few phrases here and there.  

 

You're missing 3 of the 5 languages I know. This is discrimination!

 

 What are the other two languages you know?

 

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I took 4 years of French in school. Nothing too useful, but I do recall a few phrases that might serve me well. Too bad it has to be Canadian French instead of France French. I could have pursued it farther in high school, but I chose not to because the past French classes were terrible.

Why were the past French classes horrible?  People compare French Canadian speech to American English to British English.  I have a family of friends from France that don't live far from me, so when I'm with them we only speak French.  I struggle sometimes, but that's part of learning.

 

The classes weren't anything overly useful. I learned a few basic phrases that could be useful, such as "Where is the washroom?" or "My name is ____." and the even more useful "I speak English. And you?"

 

(if you ignore the fact I now speak like a superhero).

There's nothing wrong with that. I find myself throwing in some phrases that sound superhero-like every now and again.

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I took 4 years of French in school. Nothing too useful, but I do recall a few phrases that might serve me well. Too bad it has to be Canadian French instead of France French. I could have pursued it farther in high school, but I chose not to because the past French classes were terrible.

Why were the past French classes horrible?  People compare French Canadian speech to American English to British English.  I have a family of friends from France that don't live far from me, so when I'm with them we only speak French.  I struggle sometimes, but that's part of learning.

 

The classes weren't anything overly useful. I learned a few basic phrases that could be useful, such as "Where is the washroom?" or "My name is ____." and the even more useful "I speak English. And you?"

 

(if you ignore the fact I now speak like a superhero).

There's nothing wrong with that. I find myself throwing in some phrases that sound superhero-like every now and again.

 

Well you have to start somewhere :)  

 

 

Now I really want to go back to learning Italian.

I really have neglected my Italian horribly, I spoke it much better when I was younger, but then again, I spent more time in Italy.

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Part of the reason I'd like to learn is so I can take an extended trip there down the line. Italy is such a beautiful country and I'd like to experience fully. It'd also just be nice to be bilingual, even if Italian isn't the most in-demand language.

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I'm a native speaker of English and passingly decent in Japanese (but I wouldn't call it fluent).

 

I got started learning the language the "standard" way: taking classes at my undergrad institution, where it was actually my major.

 

However, I'd have to say I learned more practical Japanese, once I had the writing system and the basics of grammar and vocab under some kind of control, from the year I spent living there and from reading, watching, and playing things in the language.

 

Everybody's best method will be different, but for me, I found that while classes gave me a good foundation, they were pretty sterile environments. I found I didn't learn a lot of the things there that interested me. So I took the basics I did know and started branching out. Living in Tokyo for a while really helped, because I had to use Japanese to communicate, handle my business, and survive day to day. Still, even if you don't have that option with your language of choice, you can improve yourself with or without classes.

 

Practice often and with material you enjoy, and, at least in my experience, the work quickly becomes play.

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