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The Don Killuminati

Oh goodness did they absolutely ruin the class system.

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Not only do you lose an intermediate class's abilities when you change to another equal or lower class, but you also lose them when you change to an advanced class with said intermediate class as a requirement. For example, I lost HealUs and Revive from my Paladin and QuadHits from Battlemaster by changing to God Hand. This basically makes taking an advanced class a weakness and nerfs you while trying to learn a new class. Absolutely awful.

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I read about this, supposedly they did it so the various classes aren't completely worthless once you unlock better ones.  I also believe that Paladin gets Healus and Revive... later on?  

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That's... annoying. I really liked 7's class system. :(

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I agree, it does seem frustrating, but I remember characters being absolutely broken after you mastered a lot of classes, I heard you could beat God in two turns.

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Well, damn. No more spamming QuadHits. Grrrr... I mean I guess this was coming once they did DQIX that way. Is it now like DQIX or can you carry some spells/abilities across?

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That really does suck. VII's class system was amazing, actually I'd go to as far to say it is the best out of any game period probably. Sure you could Sword Dance your way through the end, but that was the easy peasy casual route.

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Sword Dance! That's what. I used, not QuadHits. D'oh!

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That really does suck. VII's class system was amazing, actually I'd go to as far to say it is the best out of any game period probably. Sure you could Sword Dance your way through the end, but that was the easy peasy casual route.

Sounds like something I would say... (Except I never bothered with Swordanc. Just QuadHits, Drakslash, Fireslash, Retaliate, and a couple others.)

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Look at things from this perspective.  Would you really want to play the "exact" same game?  I mean look at DQV DS and PS2.  There are enough changes to make it a whole new experience.  Similarly with 4, and ESPECIALLY with 3, and to a lesser extent 1 and 2.

 

6 is so far the only remake that only slightly alters the game, mostly fixes, and some rebalancing, a few minor changes like the casinos, no serious additions (dreamcards and that slime mini-game that transfers nothing to the main are relatively small by comparison to the additions in all previous remakes aside from 1+2, which have no additions).  There's only one major alteration: the Beastmaster class no longer recruits monsters.  Not that the system was large, or expansive (only 20 monsters total, including Lizzie and the two slimes gained from the Slime Arena), but it offered some incentive for playing Beastmaster.  Now it's changed to just a prerequisite for Ranger, and there are 9 total monsters, all of them story related, and most of the fat/useless monster types in terms of base skills/stats/resistances are removed (oh that's another thing, monsters in the SFC have no resistances after recruitment, except for Drago/Lizzie).  In place are slimes and Lizzie, the only main story gifted monster recruitment, is still present.

 

So it's changed in a way that offers enough to be a different experience, but NOTHING like any of the prior remakes.  There just isn't as much incentive, unless you prefer an easier early game, harder later game (due to some skill changes and lack of resistances in characters), easier access to every bit of information you need/want about characters, a more streamlined and smartly designed Dharma/Dhama/Alltrade's, and if you don't care about the spell name changes (like myself...my only qualm is the lack of THORDAIN, simply because it is the coolest possible name ever granted to any spell, EVER).

 

C'mon think about it.  Let's say you're on a mountain top, you're looking at an army of monsters coming at you, and you wave a staff in the air.  Are you going to say "Kazzaple!" and think you're cool, or what about "Dragon Soul!" (cooler, but still not strong enough to strike fear in the hearts of evil), or are you going to say..."THORDAIN!".  When that bolt of lightning hits a single individual monster, you know deep down you were glad you yelled out "THORDAIN".  Your comrades will now respect you, you will respect yourself, and all monster kind will fear you greatly.  Just those words alone have power.

 

Yes, I'm over 30, but even were I 90, I would still state it much the same.  Thordain's loss is a loss to us all...

 

You don't even need to mix it up with things, just create a special skill, call it "THORDAIN", and be done with it!

 

I think even the Thundercats could use some "THORDAIN" action.  Maybe even Voltron as they slash the sword...have a voice that sounds like Keith yell out "THORDAIN" as it rips through the evil Robeasts.  Heck, even Car Voltron would benefit from healthy usage of "THORDAIN".

 

 

Ok, enough about the Thordain, sorry about that, I tend to get carried away.

 

So where was I?  Oh right, the remake.

 

Look at the class system from this perspective, due to the nature of having maybe 1/2 the skills stick to certain classes, and the lack of hybrid skills, now it streamlines the class system, forces some tactical approach to what classes to use when, on which boss, at what time, and what class path to ultimately take (hopefully the game will provide some info on this...oh right, it's a DQ and we have to look towards fan sites or do the hard work ourselves).  However the game is now lessened in time spent on the core for those who want to maximize classes and pick and choose what ultimate class setups they prefer.  It's different, but that means a different game, and in many ways it gives credence and credibility to replaying the original, as it keeps the original a different enough experience to warrant a port and a playthrough for any and all comers who play and enjoy DQ7 3DS!

 

I for one am rather excited at the prospect of analyzing the best methods to handle any given situation, beyond just the usual skills.  Heck, even in DQ 7 PSX, many experienced playthroughs go for only two main classes: Shepherd and TeenIdol, with perhaps a Sage.  Anything else is just whatever you want it to be, and now the game can be played at very low levels, it can become the single most difficult TB game ever made outside of Atlus, and it can be fun.  This version will provide whole new avenues of looking at the class system and approaches to strategy.

 

I'm diggin' it.  I also love the concept of the lithographs, the second extra bonus dungeon, and the secret extra character.  Not to mention using a combo of 8 and 9's world map, and being able to hunt down monsters individually, per choice, making seed farming that much easier (or heck, hunting down rare weapons/armour that are available only through monsters, or at a higher rate from monsters than through the Lucky Panel, or when I don't have the cash for them at the shop, or because some monsters just have them earlier, giving a nice advantage).

 

I'm pumped.

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Ruined (or similar) is always the term used when a system was nerfed because it was badly planned in the first place.

 

The original Class System was, to be frank, terrible.  There was no point to it once you realized which classes gave the broken skills.  Look at half of the posts in this very thread.  "Aww, now I can't spam [spell/ability]."  That's all the old class system was.  Find one overpowered skill, and just go with that forever because by the time you learned it you had a repository of skills combined with future classes that kept the broken skills that made you completely broken.  It was awful, and completely unbalanced.

 

Is the new system flawless?  No.  There are some abilities that should be kept, especially so that a switch to an unleveled, but just unlocked, class isn't completely useless until it learns its own stuff, however having you keep EVERYTHING you learned at any point in time from any of the other linked classes was a bad system.  It needed to be changed.

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I look forward to a new experience. May need to adjust some strategies, but that makes things a little more interesting. Just as long as it makes the game still possible without extraneous grinding (normal DQ grinding is fine, of course).

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Would you really want to play the "exact" same game?

 

Yes. I would have rather this game have been the exact same game (content-wise, adding in an extra dungeon at the end is fine in this case, altering the existing content is a no-no) with just updated sound and visuals.

 

That isn't to say I'm not excited for this game. Of course I bloody am. It is DRAGON WARRIOR VII, one of the best games of all time. I want this so bad.

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 Heck, even Car Voltron would benefit from healthy usage of "THORDAIN".

 

DON'T CALL VEHICLE VOLTRON "CAR VOLTRON" IN MY PRESENCE. SHOW SOME RESPECT FOR THE UNDERRATED 'TRON.

Though seriously, never played DWVII, but yeah, it does seem annoying, but i can see where a few of you are coming from.

Edited by Chanticleer Hegemony

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Would you really want to play the "exact" same game?

 

Yes. I would have rather this game have been the exact same game (content-wise, adding in an extra dungeon at the end is fine in this case, altering the existing content is a no-no) with just updated sound and visuals.

 

That isn't to say I'm not excited for this game. Of course I bloody am. It is DRAGON WARRIOR VII, THE BEST GAME of all time. I want this so bad.

 

fixed.

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"When that bolt of lightning hits a single individual monster, you know deep down you were glad you yelled out "THORDAIN".  Your comrades will now respect you, you will respect yourself, and all monster kind will fear you greatly.  Just those words alone have power."

 

 

I agree. I also like that "Thordain" sounds like the marketing name of some new wonder drug. I'm now imagining the "Take Charge" jingle from those old TV commercials for Valtrex - but with "Thordain" in place of "Take Charge." Thordain, the newest treatment for genital slurpes.   
 
Yelling "Kazzaple!" makes me feel like I'm demanding a bottled beverage. Like "Snapple!"
Edited by Tabbydasher

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"When that bolt of lightning hits a single individual monster, you know deep down you were glad you yelled out "THORDAIN".  Your comrades will now respect you, you will respect yourself, and all monster kind will fear you greatly.  Just those words alone have power."

 

 

I agree. I also like that "Thordain" sounds like the marketing name of some new wonder drug. I'm now imagining the "Take Charge" jingle from those old TV commercials for Valtrex - but with "Thordain" in place of "Take Charge." Thordain, the newest treatment for genital slurpes.   
 
Yelling "Kazzaple!" makes me feel like I'm demanding a bottled beverage. Like "Snapple!"

 

Brilliant!  We go into production tomorrow.  One man's genital slurpes today is a whole town's tomorrow!  Do you think it cures metallaria?  How about fizzed toenails?  It might even cure slime pattern baldness!

 

Yes, I most whole heartedly agree, "Do you want your Kazzaple with that Hummus?" feels natural.  "Fear the wrath of God and the intensity of his Kazzaple!," does not.

Edited by ignasia7

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Goodness, Ignasia7; I thought I wrote the longest posts in these here parts! ^_^ Well then, I'm only going to say this once: Dragon Warrior VII is an amazing game, beloved by more dragon quest fans than any other (for it's time) for it's pristine excellence in near every category. It doesn't now, didn't need, and would never had needed a bloody remake. And I'll say to all the whining chaps that want a different class system or gameplay experience, to play a bloody DIFFERENT GAME, thanks much, and goodnight. ;)

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If you don't like it, DON'T PLAY IT; and if it's not just the way you want it, DON'T RUIN IT for everyone else. The class system, to the average player such as myself, made the game balanced. Before getting classes and abilities, I got knocked around. And do you know what happened to me AFTER I allocated some of the stronger classes, after fighting many battles and working hard to obtain them? I got knocked around again, albeit I enjoyed the occasional short and sweet victory! :D I mean, I'm in the depths of Engow's volcano, with a hero, a godhand, a bard and a dragoon, and I'm getting murdered by 2 rosevines. And only alittle under the recommended level! Let me advocate this unto thee; sleep and paralysis skills are enough to bring even seasoned adventurers to their knees. And do you think one can simply tackle Orgodemir without some powerful skills? Maybe some can, but let me share alittle story. There was once a foolish young drak who, having played dragon warrior VII up to the Dharma Temple, became stuck at the Inopp and Gonz battle due to underleveling, having sped through the first eight chapters to enjoy the incredible storyline. And so it was, overwhelmed, that this drak quit playing until someone gave him a gameshark; with which he utilzed to increase his character levels to their maximum. And so did he speed through the entire game unattested, albeit unable to increase his character class rankings, why would he need too? And so it came to be, that upon reaching Orgodemir in the final conflict, did his level 99 characters, with their amazing equiptment purchased with infinite gold, get absolutely trounced in a matter of minutes. And so it was, that this drak found out that fighting the enemies in the Dark palace, as well as the ocean on disc 2, will bring up your class levels even if you are level 99; and so he fully powered, after several days, 2 godhands, a hero, and a summoner, which easily bested Orgodemir. Of course. What does one expect from max leveled, max classed characters? Was it fun? No. But, anyway, so did this drak then challenge god post-game, to which he barely beat him under the turn limlt! Seriously, how can anybody beat him at a reasonably challenging level under the limit, when he barely did so by cheating! Amazing! And you lot want it to be more difficult. Nicey, nice then, eh'? I guess some people feed on nothing but absurdly tough challenges, but don't drag the rest of us down with ye'. We NEED those classes and abilities to stay alive, and overleveling is frowned upon in a level grinding rpg- THAT's where you're all missing the bloody point. Stay at the suggested levels, with as many skills as you can muster, and THAT'S how you enjoy a dragon quest and still have a decent amount of challenge. That aforementioned drak isno longer the fledgling fool he was, and, having started a new game on that good old psx dwVII (currently now in chapter 24) will never again use a code device on a dragon quest as long as he lives. ^_^

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*scratches head*

 

Wow.

 

I'm not exactly sure what your position is though Robotnik.  It seems you feel as though the original game was pristine in all its original glory, and was difficult enough of a game that it required the class system as is, with all its broken aspects, that were balanced in the sense it allowed for defeat of a boss at lower levels.  That somehow the act of class mastery does not in and of itself create an over-leveling bubble, which in your own estimation is wrong and bad as THAT, not having class skills that deal 300 and 600 damage regardless of level, is the definition of overpowered in DQ7.

 

Yet at the same time, your initial post's wording is vague enough it can be read as: If you want to play the original, play it, don't defame it, it's perfect in all its glory, but this one whatever changes will also be perfect in its glory.  So just let things be and enjoy the remake, but remember the game never required one because it was just dandy in its original incarnation.

 

 

So...are you up for the remake or not?  Or is it more of a need to show why you appreciate the original so, feeling as though the game you've come to love so much has been utterly trashed and misrepresented for the glorious experience you know it to be?

 

 

I should state outright that I have a very different opinion than you do on what constitutes overpowered and difficult, but that's personal preference.  I should also state that, I agree, DQ7 PSX was a fantastic experience, and no it does not NEED a remake, but I LIKE the fact it has one, and when there exists a remake I tend to prefer it's an actual "remake" rather than just a shinier port.   I should also finally like to mention that Dragon Quest VII IS by far, and by far I mean there's almost a mile long marker between favourite game 1 and 2, my favourite game.  I would say of all games ever made, my top three are as follows:

 

Dragon Quest VII >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Final Fantasy XII >>> Resident Evil 4, and the rest alter and change constantly, but these three have remained constant since their releases and my discernment of why I enjoy each experience.

 

With that in mind, I also find DQ7 one of the least balanced games in the history of class based gameplay.  I find more faults with it than most.  For example, I rate DQ7 a 7/10, FF12 a 9.5/10, and RE4 a 9.5/10.  I just happen to enjoy DQ7 more, and enjoy the brokenness of the game, along with the charm, score, and most importantly the characters and story.  Gabo happens to be my personal favourite sidekick in gaming history.  Hobo Link easily the most charming concept of a child turned Hero, the perfect antithesis of what I would expect of one.  However it's easily the most flawed of every Dragon Quest before or since, and possibly ever, and the most exploitable system in DQ history, while making for an arduous task to get even one character to Hero class prior to Coastal, especially given DQ7 has THE lowest encounter rate of any Dragon Quest...ever, save in three areas of the game.

 

So lovable, yes, perfect?  No.  I wouldn't change the experience as is if I replayed the PSX version.  I would not enjoy it as much, but if anything a remake like this would only add to appreciating the original game in all its original glory, no?  Afterall, while I find Final Fantasy 4 DS the only FF4 I will play now (don't ask me to even touch the PSP version, I can't stand the bland gameplay and lack of story that was added to the DS), I recognize that for many games it has put the original game on a grander pedestal because of the changes, while bringing in new crowds that would not have played FF4 otherwise.

 

Like it or not, enjoy or appreciate the changes or not, there are always positives to having a remake that actually functions as a remake.

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The class system is OPTIONAL, old boy. You don't need to utilize it. It's like a difficulty setting. Skilled players, such as yourself, don't need such quote, unquote:BROKEN abilities, yes? Then don't use them- players such as myself want them, so don't ruin it for the rest if us (and after I had previously stated in my second post that the game can still be difficult even after allocating advanced classes...) Now then, mayhaps you may cease and desist your molehill renovation. ;) In regards to the morality and mindset behind a remake, that is up for philosophical discussion. But understand this: art is not meant to be copied or remade, art is an expression. In other words, why bother with remaking something slightly, when with a little extra effort, you can make something new AND creative? Let's face it- it's meant to be the same game. Is it an alternate universe retelling? No. Is it a sequel, prequel, or side entry? Certainly not. You CAN attempt to improve something old, by making something new WHILE learning from your mistakes. Dragon Warrior VII's flaws, as stated by your responses Ignasia7, and various other posts here, are all optional or opinionated. There are many different methods to playing a complex game such as this; in other words, it's "flaws" alone do not merit a remake. I've already soundly denounced the cheap thrill of creatorial integrity of repolishing SOMEONE ELSES'S ideas, so how about the generational aspect? Shouldn't younger players get the opportunity to play historically magnificent titles like this one? They certainly should: on a playstation 1, 2 or 3. :D This game SHOULD be a history lesson to 3ds owners, NOT something they may simply pull out of their pockets and plug in. Do you realize that they could simply port dragon warrior VII onto the playstation network, (like most of the final fantasies), instead of dedicating time and resources away from creating new dragon quests that the new generation can fondly remember, just as we did? GREED. Enix would rather sponge the consumer than to perserve and respect their own historical integrity. They NEVER release virtual console dragon quest titles, despite fan demand being relatively high. Well, nevermind that; I suppose they don't even give us any games now... at all. ;)

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So, getting back to the brass tacks equation of this poster's question: YES, they did ruin the class system of dragon warrior VII, in the sense that a remake's objectives, primary or otherwise, are to update graphics, add additional content, reach out to a growing audience, and to patch up previous flaws, assumingly. By altering the class system from it's previous state, they only removed the OPTION of utilizing them in the fullest manner as some players CHOSE to do. It's a remake of VII: NOT a retelling, NOT a sequel, prequel, or side story, so in other words there was no need to take away what most players were perfectly happy with, when it was not imperative to the gameplay or game completion. It's akin to demanding that an icecream parlor remove the option of some of the more fattening flavors you think are too tempting for your low calorie intake, even though you didn't have to eat them. Seriously, old bean- I don't adore every aspect of VII either, but all things in consideration, it's one of the best in the series! The many reasons which you provide as indicative flaws are all so trivial- the encounter rate is too low? Than choose to use whistle; the most unbalanced in the series? You mean how it takes more battles to level up, and how few good treasures are ever to be found in dungeons, or how recovering from losing your fourth character AS WELL AS being robbed of all special abilities at one point in the game, and then subsequently fighting a string of the very difficult bosses really cranks up the difficulty level? Or how there was more to do, more to see, more side quests then ever, more story and dialogue than ever previously thought possible... the party chat... was SO mind-bogglingly comprehensive, even to individual npcs... all that sounds unbalanced? Really? The hardest, purely and by proxy, final boss of any dragon quest? More post game content? The excellent, and challenging, monster skill sets? OR, perhaps you just mean... the OPTIONAL class system. Oh, dear, oh dear. ^_^ How exhausting.... perhaps now things are a bit more clear. Yes, they did, indeed, ruin the class system. Any questions, quest fans? :D

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Oh, rats! I don't like how my two, giant paragraphs have been separated from one another by page size constraints. Oh well, I suppose; one can only hope that descenters choose to read page 1's conclusion for the whole story. Chin up, then! ^_^ Reading is fun to mental, as they say.

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Indeed friends, dragon warrior VII's class system is not flawed; instead, it is a question of willpower, a measure of skill, and ultimately: up to the individual to decide upon completion. Changing it was simply a form of censorship..... and I DESPISE censorship. ^_^

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Just as knowledged was banned in ages dark; it was feared by those who sought control, and forcibly removed away from the people to control them. It's also akin to banning books, films, games, or ideas for being insensitive or politically incorrect, or how they ban cards in ccg games for being powerful. So, they're powerful. Get over it, I say. There are many paths to attaining power, just as there are many different ways to be powerful. Resourcefullness, as well as creativity and new ideas, do not require the removal of other things in order to succeed. That is the path of ignorance! :D

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Wait wait wait.  Let me get this straight.  Square-Enix is "greedy" because it choose to make a costly remake, that you feel took away from new Dragon Quests as Horii could have devoted more time and energy to X and XI (whenever we hear word of that), instead of a cheap cash-in like a digital download release that is bound to have numerous bugs given S-E's history with digital download releases?

 

Are you sure this is your line of reasoning?  I'm not trying to be condescending here, I'm just saying perhaps you should rethink your analysis.

 

There are a few things here that must be addressed which would be patently untrue in light of how this works.

 

Point 1.  Square-Enix is a combination of Square and Enix.  Yes, Square's acting President at the time of the merger is SE's President.  It's VP was from Enix (forget his former role but it was high high up, and I believe he was the CEO of Enix), the next acting head is from Square, and the board chairmen is from Enix.  That's relatively 50/50 for the top of the top.  After that the vast bulk of the company, including most board members, teams, team leaders, team managers, programmers, etc. are all Square.  So in terms of overall board representation, the majority is Square, with many former Enix executives getting a nice severance package of buying into most of the stock, leaving former Enix employees with a 55% control as a combined share (be they members retired, left, or who remained on board), and Square employees having an overall stock representation of 45%.

 

Granted, I do not know the actual stock holdings figures of the largest shareholders in the company from either Square or Enix.  I can say that most of Square-Enix's tactics in how they treat the West mimic those of Square prior to working with Sony, and during much of their time with EA leading up to the merger, with Enix having been the more open company during that 1998-2003 period.  However, Enix was also closed leading into the SNES era.

 

The general focus has clearly been on Square games, though many of Square's old franchises, like Enix's, have been tabled.  However, in Square's case they owned every product fully, and in Enix's it was always a shared ownership, having little to no in-house staff beyond a few creators but no real development teams.  Thus Dragon Quest was always developed by external sources, as with other products like Star Ocean, a Tri-Ace developed game that Enix produced, and the Quintet games from the days of yore.  So for Square-Enix it has been easier to produce more Square products and thus give the indication it is Square with the SE brand.  Especially, as you've mentioned, Final Fantasy.  Though there has been good reason for this which I'll explain later.  We'll call it Point Extra.

 

However, because this is a collaboration of voices from both Square and Enix, and because the chairman of the board is a former Enix employee, there is plenty of pull in the direction of the board chair.  However, like I said, it could be Wada has the largest stock holdings of every board member and thus his voice and decisions carry more weight.  It is also true that typical of Japan, corporations are run like dictatorships, with the rest of the members typically falling in line and rarely showing dissent and direct disagreement.  However this is not the case with every corporation.  What I do know is I can find NOTHING indicating how SE is run.  Nothing concrete that isn't speculative.  Not like say, for Nintendo, which we know is run like a dictatorship from Japan on down, in the sense that NoA is autonomous until NoJ makes a call and that's that.  We simply have no clue, but we do know Wada has always had a history of not caring about fans, not listening to fans, and not knowing any single thing about what makes his company successful.  Afterall, the man was positively shocked to hear in like 2007, maybe 2008, that fans wanted a remake of FF7, which has been pushed for since the internet went mainstream, so pre-2000.  There are various reasons for the desire for a remake (back then a lot of fans wanted a "finished" FF7, myself included and there were quite a few of us on various chatrooms), but the point is the President and CEO of Square-Enix doesn't even know what Japanese fans want until he himself orders a poll to be conducted in Famitsu and decides to read it.

 

 

Now, onto Point 2.  Greed.  Your point is that Square-Enix is taking a greedy road in rebooting Dragon Quest VII.  They are taking advantage of the fans and extorting more money, which, while not your wording, is your implication.  That somehow if they did a digital release of Dragon Quest, like they did Final Fantasy 7, 8, and 9 for the Playstation, it would be the right and proper thing to do as the game is, in your estimation, perfect (this is your word).

 

Here's the problem with this.  To make a remake means spending a lot of money up front.  Not to mention spending a great deal on advertising.  The 3DS may be a new console, it's tool kit may be based on the DS, thus making it easier to develop for as it requires very little time learning the ins and outs, but it's a whole new audience.  There is no way to be sure the entire DQ audience from the DS era moved to the 3DS.  There's no way to be sure that people who played Dragon Quest VII on the Playstation and who wish to play it again on a new system have a 3DS.  So, the only way to ensure maximum sales is to create a serious marketing campaign, which to my knowledge it received.

 

Now, sure the cost to buy the game would indeed be higher for the 3DS release, however, the question is profit margin.  Digital downloads are almost 90% profit, sometimes lower depending on several factors, like whatever cost the server provider and game developer charge.  A 3DS cartridge is costly by comparison, especially when DQVII is released so early into the 3DS's life cycle.  Square-Enix must pay for the production of each 3DS cartridge, and likely profit margins per sale are probably somewhere between 7 and 15% for the first million sold, and perhaps 10-20% and going up slightly with each new additional sale, as the cost of game production is taken care of, but I don't expect it to exceed 30% per unit sold.

 

There's also the fact that Digital Downloads reach a larger audience in that it would cost them very little to prep the download for PSP and PS3, and then PS4/Vita.

 

The general concept of greed is "cash-in", or cop out if you want.  No effort releases that cost virtually nothing, show no effort, have perhaps limited to no marketing, and would be up and around forever with almost 100% profit margins per sale.  No sir, your suggestion of what they should have done would have been the essence of greed if anything.  However I wouldn't even call it that.  I say more DQ period, however I like remakes, I like replaying a game in a new light that brings new elements.  I LIKE change, and when I don't want it, I go back to the original version.

 

This remake shows care, it shows class, it shows a consideration to bring the games to a new audience that would have a harder time taking to it due to how most gamers exist today.  There is a lot more media to explore, attention spans are reduced, and as a result both young and old audiences need something to cater to that.  I actually have to set aside time to replay DQ7, even if I attempt a speed run.  I actually have to shift my day to account for the game.  Of course with a digital download I wouldn't have to do that either (CFW is the same way, but with more complications), but it would be the same ol' same ol'.

 

Personally I'd rather see both, and until we know what version of DQ7 will be ported to mobile, perhaps your dream will come true.

 

 

Now that that's out of the way, Point 3.  This was Square-Enix's decision.

 

For being a Dragon Quest fan, it's always funny how few people who are massive fans realize the structure of Dragon Quest's game development.  Nothing is done without the goose that lays the golden egg having the idea.  Perhaps Square Enix might pitch concepts to Yuji Horii, but in every interview I've ever ready, any and all decisions past, present, and future go through Horii or bust.

 

Here's how it breaks down.  Japan has similar copyright laws to the US and most of Western Europe.  When there are multiple copyright owners of a product, each and every member must have his/her approval before anything can be done with that product as is, in any future form as is.  In the case of Dragon Quest this is broken down in that Square-Enix owns the publishing rights, I once thought they owned the title Dragon Quest, but I don't actually know if they do or if Horii does, or if it's a shared ownership between the trio and Enix, now SE.  Yuji Horii, through is studio Armor Project, owns the entire scenario and game rights (the actual game as it exists AFTER development, as in all content created with the development tools).  Akira Toriyama owns the rights to all art, design, and animation through his studio, Bird Studio.  The development studio that actually develops a particular game (for most of DQ's existence this was Chunsoft, then Heartbeat/ArtePiazza, then ArtePiazza for remakes and Level-5 for main games, now Square-Enix for main games and several spinoffs), owns the rights to the development tools and the shape of the game as it exists while using those particular tools.  Next is music, which was never copyrighted until somewhere around DQV I believe, when Koichi Sugiyama finally decided to copyright his work, under his own name.

 

So any decision, like the one to remake Dragon Quest VII, has to have Koichi Sugiyama, Akira Toriyama, and Yuji Horii's permission to even consider, assuming that SE had the idea.  However Horii actually LIKES remaking games.  He's stated this many many many many many many times.  He actually wants to remake his old works and provide new experiences.  So what you've just done is not only take away this as his decision, as his desire for his work, but you've also managed to fling poo in his face, and then spit all over him.

 

I'm curious, I don't believe for a second that was your intent, but consider that this is effectively what you've done.

 

 

Now for Point 4.  The trio are taken away from developing other Dragon Quest projects, like new games.  I'm a bit out of steam, so I'll make this as short as I can.

 

Dragon Quest VII was developed alongside Dragon Quest X.

 

 

Finally, we get to POINT EXTRA!  My favourite part.  I'll keep this brief as well.

 

Square-Enix has and hasn't been "whoring" Final Fantasy.   To many of us they have been, however this is due to the popularity of Final Fantasy, a desire to produce the best graphical and cinematic experience per every new Final Fantasy mainstay (Square's own terms, and repeated by Wada), mostly due to the insane popularity of FF7 (which SE clearly has no clue WHY it did so well, and it wasn't graphics, because FF6 was a better "graphical" experience, as were half the PSX 3D releases at the time, but FF7 did have a ton of flash and wow moments), which I won't get to here, because that would literally take me another 8 paragraphs to summarize.  Now in this comes tremendous cost.  As I've said above, since leaving Sony and partnering with EA, Square's tactics altered in how they marketed games (at least in the West), but even in the East they saw reduced sales of many of their formerly fantastic brands.  Seiken Densetsu, SaGa, and even Chrono Cross was severely disappointing.  They even organized to bring back the old team for another Chrono Trigger sequel, hoping to capture the insane sales of the original product (CC had done better in the US, and sold better than any other Square product on the PSX outside the FF series, but had sold roughly 1/4 of CT's SNES sales in Japan).

 

It all boils down to cost.  Production costs were still low in that era, but PSX costs were substantially higher than NES and SNES.  No longer were teams of 30-60 people sufficient.  FF7's success showed that RPG's could be insanely profitable and further reaching than ever previously considered.  Afterall, in Japan FF7 actually beat out Dragon Quest III for sales.  The ONLY Japanese RPG without the title Dragon Quest, that beat out Dragon Quest III (DQ wouldn't pull this off until 7, with 4 seeing a dip, 5 and 6 slow increases, but never quite reaching the plateau upon which 3 stood).  Square needed money, and fast to keep production running for their mainstay games, keep profits at a certain level, and allow enough money for expansion to attempt or new games that could create substantial audiences.

 

This has continued into the merger, only after the merger it was a bigger issue.  You see, SE actually saw record profits for either Square or Enix a year after the merger, but rather than slowly work out a plan to keep things going, they saw opportunity to buy new companies that were floundering but had major series that had done well in other markets.  Thus Eidos was purchased.  Then I think it was Taito, which had decent market exposure in the west and east.  During these periods there was also the FF12 debacle.  I forget exactly what happened, but Matsuno, the initial director (or was he the producer, I'd check but my browser would likely crash) of FF12 left mid game production, when they should have been nearly finished.  Few notes on his intended direction for the story and battle system, so the team scrambled to get the game finished and borrowed heavily from FF11's gameplay to come up with a working product.  That was costly, especially given 12 was the longest running FF development time at that time by far.

 

Then there was FF13, which arguably Square Enix has yet to profit off of (by that I mean it is highly unlikely the total sales of the game would have covered the immense costs for its production).  Initially a PS2 game, the original work was scrapped and they started over on the PS3, the most painful and difficult system to develop for since the Sega Saturn (more so actually because the toolset was based on nothing previous, so it had to be learned from scratch, unlike PS2 from PSX, PSP from PS2, and all Nintendo systems).  So the team had to be paid for the period they're actually learning how to create a game, how to get the most usage out of the system, and then they go ahead and build their own system tools based around the PS3 tool kit, to create their vision.  So they're adding extra cost to create their own tools.  Then they decide to expand it to three games, likely to cheapen costs by utilizing the crystal tools, the new tools they developed, for multiple games in the same universe.  To make matters worse, FF13-2 uses a new set of tools.  Then there's FF-0, initially part of the FF13 universe, and then transferred as a standalone game, that I think takes place in the same universe but is not related, nor does it use the original tool kit.  The WORST part is FF Versus-13.  Not only was this game initially developed with the original Crystal Tools, but it was scrapped and rehashed with its own brand new set of tools, and then the project was cancelled and revitalized under yet a third set of tools as FF15 for the PS4, making it THE MOST COSTLY GAME likely in history (we'll never know since SE's own financial reports does not always distinguish FF projects individually and their individual costs, nor does it label overall costs over time, only quarterly costs for production and often as a group).

 

I can go on and on, like FF14's blunder and costliness due to having to completely remake the game, borrowing from the same in-house staff that was working on other projects, including Versus13, including the future 15, including FF11, etc.  Then a tremendous amount of time went into new servers and beta testing.  That game needed a LOT of fixes before release as well.  Even after it went gold it's had more massive patches than FF11.  At least in the west.

 

So where's the money going to come from?  Most of the production teams are busy with major projects.  They release quite a few games a year.  Dragon Quest sells well, but it wouldn't pay for or carry the company on its own.  Thus the continued FF-whoring.  Thus the search for new games that would hopefully match FF and DQ in popularity, thus putting their name on projects like Arkum!

 

 

Anyway, good night.  Also, just a suggestion, please consider breaking up your paragraphs, it's awfully difficult to read one massive block of text.

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