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ignasia

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Everything posted by ignasia

  1. The more I watch the Dai ARPG video, the more I actually like the design aesthetic. It's quickly growing on me. Given it's Action, it's very likely to come out here, so I'm looking forward to that. I just hope they build a solid more standard ARPG, not the Mussou style we've seen thus far.
  2. What version are you playing? NES, SFC / GBC, or Mobile / Switch? Yes, there is a slight difference in what I would recommend. NES vs remakes is a total changeup due to stat growth and equipment. SFC/GBC vs Mobile/Switch is based on equipment options.
  3. Heh, it's called being fair and being able to differentiate something you enjoy, a subjective position, versus objective reality, such as poor choices in game design, or good choices that aren't for everyone but work well in context with that experience. Not all games have to be a fast paced to tell a good story, which you get. I mean for myself, DQ7 is a 7.5/10, and it's my favourite game. In some ways I enjoy the flaws, as they're definitely unique (like the FMV sequences...dear lord they feel like Ed Wood returned from the grave for one last destructive romp, and chose DQ7 as his final haunt). As per Season 8? Yes, but that was a given as they kicked out George R.R. Martin, and removed his influence. This was already apparent in Season 7, where he was far less involved.
  4. @YangustheLegendaryBandit Much agreed, Big-C is definitely not one of his best. Distinct, but it really doesn't fit. I was hoping for some shadowy figure, or a ton of bodily changes (afterall Cell's manga was started after DQ4, so likely Toriyama was inspired by the bug-like designs of Psaro, and the "evolution" of form). I like that as a base design, or maybe even the second to last form or something. The longest form to kill (let's assume he has 20k HP...seriously, that's something DQ11 needed, given how easy it is to hit 10k in a single round of Erik without seeds and even at low level). It's a really nifty form. An eyeless dragonoid, that looks inspired by H.R. Giger.
  5. @YangustheLegendaryBandit No he doesn't look like Cell. There are some similarities, but only in the sense of a carapace for each segment, connected with stringy joint tissue. That's about it: Cell has black spots, much like freckles. C*l*sm*s has indented bumps. Cell has a lot of black, Big-C is just two shades of green. Cell's carapace looks more like rubbery skin. Big-C's looks like a literal bug carapace, so very solid (and both behave in the way they appear...Cell's carapace is flexible, Big-C's is rigid). I thought Big-C was odd, but hardly lacking in creativity. For me it's one of the most unique boss designs. It just doesn't make sense for the physical form of
  6. Nice. Shame it's not on the US site. Probably won't be as Origami isn't nearly as popular here. Thanks for sharing. Um, thinking about this. You know what I'd love to see for Builders 3? Cross-over game packs. The Legend of Zelda and the Legend of Celda for the Switch (along with potential Mario, Kirby, and even Samus...would be sweet to run around DQB3 with Samus' suit and have two options, gun attack w/charge, and missiles :)), and maybe Final Fantasy and Kingdom Hearts for PS4/5, along with maybe Mana at some point for both systems. DQB's world feels so much at home with Zelda, especially the Builder's hat in 1, and the revision of the original hat you can unlock in 2. Plus the way Erdrick's Shield is designed in Builders, gives it a Zelda look. It seems like Dragon Quest 3's Erdrick Shield was the basis for the design aesthetic for A Link to the Past's Fighter's Shield, which was then revised into the Hylian Shield for Ocarina of Time, and it seems like the form it took in OoT is based on the US artwork for the "Shield of Heroes," in terms of format, when then inspired the eventual changes in Japan with the DQ3 remake artwork, which altered the shape further to something far more similar to the Hylian Shield in OoT. Nevermind, DQ3 Famicom had two different art styles for the Shield. Those where Erdrick is actually holding it, and it's a round Shield, the other is the art style the US team used as a basis for their "Shield of Heroes," though they both look different (Erdrick's Crest is smaller in the US, and pops out of the top portion of the shield, literally, the wings pop out and away from the shield): https://dragon-quest.org/wiki/File:DQII_Erdricks_Shield.png Kind of a boomerang effect.
  7. That's not a glitch, it's just where he is at one point, then he clearly dashes to the mountain at another. This is evidenced as intentional by him having actual dialogue, and drinking specifically in a pub, to drown his sorrows and worries away. Afterall, he was rather melancholic in Moonbrooke, always looking at the glass being half empty, always moody and terse because he's constantly worried.
  8. Fair enough. I'm not saying it necessarily makes those villains bad. It just dispels their purpose, as it's not longer about some unmovable mountain and nearly unstoppable force wishing to do something, that in the process is infinitely harmful, but those in the way to them are of no consequence, or a bit of fun. It removes that pure sensation of the shock value of the unknown, of the mystery of not knowing why, or what little we have, is as simple as "I can, I will, I do." That's good, and in a way I do understand the sentiment. Until Dragon Quest IV we had no active villains. They're just present. Waiting for the Heroes, and we clean up the mess they've made. Even since they activity isn't as flurried, and there aren't as many counter-moves as I would hope (strangely 4, 5, and 6 have the largest number, and through proxy of the Gittish Empire, as well as the first strike, 9). It isn't like FF, where we see a constant series of exchanges of interplay, whether political and nuanced forewarnings like with Seymour Guado, or the immediate aftermath of actions taken, as with Ex-Death, Kefka, and Sephiroth. So they have a point that the villains in Dragon Quest are less proactive in general. I was hoping in 11 to see more of Mordegon. Maybe some reprisal for the actions in Heliodor, or seeing more of the world covered in that shadowy mass, and each area that is covered, prior to be saved, has the creepier overworld music that plays until Heliodor is saved, much like with Dragon Quest VII. That was a VERY nice touch in 7, and one that cemented the ever present darkness. At least with 7, the nature of Orgodemir isn't inherently lazy by any stretch. It's generally not a complaint, at least until I saw the picture you posted). Given the nature of his presence until he's revealed, and the actions he takes in the aftermath make for a very solid villain, and a clever one at that. The only issue I've ever heard of being his motives are overly simplistic and thus he's a bad villain as a result (a relatively new complaint, one I'd not heard until the 3DS version, as he was considered one of the most beloved, and at least within the Dragon Quest communities in the US...and Canada, can't forget about our 51st non-state ;), he had been revered as one of the most cleverly written villains, even compared to other games. I won't go into the why's and hows of it, as that would reveal the game to you, and the three twists (though minor for one), related to the villain's storyline, but you do hear about his name literally within the first 10 minutes of gameplay, by two NPCs. So that part isn't a secret. Ah, the wonders of conversation and the turns they take. It isn't like this isn't normal here, lol. NOW you complain, when you are the king of topic turning? Big hug though, much love buddy. Also, not very random, it's far more specified, and related to the original material, which I hope the above points, at least the last paragraph will finalize the circle and we can get straight to the point of Orgodemir. However, given the TC has yet to play DQ7, and the bulk of the twists that would ruin the story are tied directly to him as a villain, I would caution what is stated and how much is given away.
  9. I think the more important question is, and you should ask yourself as this relates to the psychology of nihilism; why do you, and so many others, feel a need to empathize with a villain? Why does a villain in many modern beliefs, only stand as a well designed villain if one can garner sympathy on some level? The point being, in the general past, there wasn't a desire to do so, as harmful actions were seen as having direct ramifications. There are various points in time with complex origin stories, but once vilified, a warrior, king, even a god becomes permanently a force for evil, and the motives for this always something petty at the start, and never something to find alignment with, or sympathy for, or even understanding of in lieu of putting oneself in those shoes and finding common ground to grasp why the reader/player would follow a similar path. Vampires in Chinese lore tend to be more akin to Eastern European. Bad harmful people who are reborn to suck dry the essence of a person. Only in the East it is the spiritual/mana/prana, while in the West, the physical blood (which was inherently believed to be WHERE the spiritual strength of a person resided, and why blood letting was so common as a way to remove bad spirits and dark thoughts). What does it say about a person when the only reason today we even have sympathy for the devil, and see things through a grey scale, is because of the adoption of Nihilism, which even for Nietzsche was merely a pre-condition when one begins to see the yoke of humanity striving in vain for a better world without striving for himself to become a better being first. Essentially society has adopted wholesale as truth, what Nietzsche himself saw as a first step, which eventually becomes a lie, as the belief taints the soul, as one who adopts such thoughts, through cognitive bias and cognitive dissonance, will ignore good deeds and see only ill deeds and for those doing good deeds, darker motives. One becomes trapped in a vicious cycle they cannot escape from. This stems initially from seeing the filth in ones own life, and their own dark works, generating a sense that even oneself is polluted, and finding the source, the teachings and machinations of the larger societal construct. His solution was a progressive governance run in a strict regimented way that would enforce good behaviour and learning, developing constantly through scientific rigor using the best people to eventually develop a perfect regimented system that through fire and brimstone, would force the general population through hard toil to seek to become better, and in escaping the system, develop the tools of the ubermensch, and with this grander understanding from those trials, and the superior tools and mindset, the nihilism would fall away as one sees the world only through sound reason. Not that I agree with Nietzsche's proposition, but the man is fount of most of our societal beliefs in the West, and the general play by play of left versus right politics...which is a whole other thing, and connects to spiritual paths (magickal if you want to be more specific...the paths of the Magi in Jewish Mysticism, Boaz and Jaochim...which you can see as order within, chaos without, or order without, chaos within, the goal to play both sides to find the center path which leads to the God-head....this is where political branches of Right and Left originate). If you guessed which side holds the greatest sway as the left, and the moral ambiguity it brings, such as a desire to find common ground with a villain as much as a hero, stems from ones sense of self being rather low, and ones connection to the divine being nearly non-existent (and no I'm not talking about crazy church people speaking in tongues and frolicking back and forth, or wild dances in the jungle with certain tribal groups, getting into the rhythm and flow, though this does have a correlation...it's just a primitive form of attempting to breach the veil to reach the essence and grandeur of something beyond this world). ====== Another aspect I hadn't considered until now, is the world of the West is based on the court system, and justice of damages done. What I think most people usually want to know about a person's actions, let's say theft, would be why they took that action. What brought that about? Not for any other reason than most people cannot see themselves doing such actions, even if they could, because anyone who has ever recalled those moments where the line was nearly crossed, recalls that there is a VERY fine line that determines taking a bad action or either not doing anything or doing something good...usually just bad or nothing. I tend to find a lot of people either don't want to recall those moments, especially if they took the wrong route, and the lessons they had to go through, or the guilt they felt in taking that action (why feel guilt at all, even if such an action wasn't explicitly taught being another aspect?). Or they dissassociate. Yet some part of the mind always has that connection to the dark side, the curiosity of it, as we are inherently dualistic, there's always that desire to know as a way to reconnect with that darker half without actually internally facing our own demons in the mirror. Thus, with a nihilistic approach to most modern story telling, with the basic premise that because we can, some of us just will, or we don't care and overlook the actual bad things we somehow do (carbon footprint, which is a lie, as we all breath out CO2, but it's used as a tool to tie us down to the idea we're inherently bad and cannot do anything about it, the very act of living...then there's stuff like eating animals, when even breathing will kill organisms, and plants are living organisms as well who also release poisons into their cells when we eat them, just as animals do when they die, that in turn rots the food and harms us in the process of digestion). Further pushing the notion we should sympathize with the devil. Afterall, we ARE the devil in modern society. We ARE the plague on the planet. The parasite that was seeded to this world from outside, not truly part of it. Or so we're constantly bombarded with such messages through various media at various points in time (more commonly TV and certain mainstream shows that appear online for streaming). That has to play a role in guiding us towards wanting to feel as though a better written villain is a victim, just like us, a victim who is also evil, but who we can see as being superior to us if given the right motivations and righteous reason to enact his/her vengeance upon the scum of humanity. Notice how the prime "god-tier" villain has decided to wipe out all of humanity because of the actions of a VERY SELECT few, and a total misinterpretation of the one human he came to love. A VERY petty, very low-grade motivation (wrath) treated as righteous by someone who obviously feels humanity itself is worth burning to the ground. That even he/she, the author of this graphic, feels unworthy of life being human, and feels as though the direction of Corvus is correct, so they resonate, and raise Corvus to the top tier, not because he has motivations, but because Corvus aligns with THEIR innermost desires of self-destruction. Which again falls back on the first point, and the affects of nihilism on the world. ====== The other factor is that it's not why a villain does their evil that is the only aspect of story that needs be told to be a good story. In this case the idea of control to force people to align with good deeds somehow being a higher level thought that would amount to positive outcome. There are many other facets to a well written story, and a well written villain. Does the villain ever pursue, and in either case, why? What actions does the villain take? How does this affect the Hero? I'm too tired to think of other questions...I wish I wrote them out when I was working, but I didn't. I had a few extras that were fairly good, and another aspect of storytelling that isn't linked to motivations, that define a good villain. This will do, but my apologies. I found a few. Do they attempt to do harm to the Hero's homestead? To capture him/her? What further specific actions are taken throughout the course of the story that define that villain. THIS more than anything, SHOULD be the more defining element of a good villain. Not the motivation, which is helpful and useful at times, but only if one wishes to find common ground, which I find makes sense only in context of someone who is like us. A mortal, a human or human-like creature that we can relate to. A god, a demonic lord? Why do we need to work out the machinations that guide the hand? What does that gain us to put ourselves in that role within the context of the story, as in forcing us down the constructed narrative of motivations? Isn't it more fun, if we're talking about someone who isn't human, or an unstoppable monster, to roleplay that being to figure out what that would be like, and if we want to create a motivation beyond just...this is fun, yeah, let's take over that world, or let's kill that person, or let's see that town burn down...woo, then let that be up to the imagination of the player/user/reader? Do we know what Sauron's motivation is? Oh right, it's the ring of power so he can rule, because he wants to. I don't see people complaining about that. Or Ungoliant, who simply wishes to feed on everything, to devouring the world as a whole? How about Nemesis? Nemesis might have once been human, but once becoming a specialized Tyrant, as far as we know, it just does what it does because that's all it is. It's Jason or Michael Meyers. Do we really need to understand the mind of Michael Meyers for him to have been a good villain? No, and the act of trying to do so polluted the original narrative, creating a grossly inflated script and movie that took us out of the context that Michael Meyer's is a monster who kills because he likes to, because he can, and because it's a game to him. A child's mind locked into the idea of killing his family on Halloween. It removes the fear factor of Meyers when we develop sympathy for him. Thus disengaging the fun of watching the original movie, or the new movie. It's too complicated now, because HE is too complicated, and the concept of horror is undone. Similarly with Cosmic Horror. I do not see people complaining about not understanding Cthulhu's feelings and why he desires to devour souls and bring about the destruction of this world, driving it into an eternal cycle of madness. Yet he's a great villain? Why? We don't know anything about WHY he does what he does, or why he seeks to become the level of god he wants to be? What about the other Cosmic Horror beings and the old ones, etc. in H.P. Lovecraft. What if Lovecraft games started coming out, do you really need to know WHY beings beyond our understanding desire to torture and set humanity to flame for them to be good villains? We certainly have Soulsborne, and Soulsborne borrows almost 1:1 from Lovecraft's universe. I see no complaints on the discussions of each monster as the game comes across them, or the lore behind them. Yet nothing is related to a motive, a need to define a desire to explain the nature of these beings. So why does DQ require this to have good villains? What really makes a good villain is far more complicated than one element alone, and do you not think it intellectually obtuse to define a villain on the merits using only ONE factor? That all things hang on that one detail to feel they've been handled well? I sure as #$*! do not.
  10. I don't disagree, but I think my main point is, sometimes it's fine to experience stories without moral ambiguity. Something we've forgotten and lack appreciation for in modern times, is that there are absolute morals. They actually govern the world, and there is such a thing as Karma, which isn't a grey-area system, it's just a basic governing system, and there are people who actively choose at many points to go negative because they want to, no motivation. That boogiemen do actually exist, and not every individual requires any grand motivating element except that they can (almost all serial killers have the motivation that they can, and no one has stopped them, so they'll continue doing something that they find enjoyable...scale this up to people in real seats of power, which certainly exists, and you have a human being on the level of a Dragon Quest Daimaou). When nearly every videogame story is grey, or has some semblance of grey motivation and an attempt at complex antagonists sometimes black and white should be considered "different" and one should be open to it. Something quite a few players aren't, as it's a common complaint about Dragon Quest antagonists, with almost the sole exception of Psaro (to a far lesser degree, Mordegon, and even less for Jasper). They want more of the same, and yet complain about the lack of variety in their games, when there are only so many motivations that can work, depending on context and how its told, or complain about shallow motivations (like Jasper's pure jealousy and envy, ignoring that most complex villains stem from similar roots, only with more padding). Which speaks volumes about the lack of imagination in a lot of players, or willingness to expand on things using nuanced clues and prefer detailed very obvious development or backstories that lend credence to such actions, even if they devolve to little more than envy or greed most of the time, and envy seems to be the favourite, while I find greed is generally the least accepted motivating factor.
  11. I've written several essay posts on this. Deleted each of them. I'm not sure if I really want to get into this without overcomplicating matters. Dragon Quest VII is my favourite game with good reason. It's a HEAVILY flawed game, and sadly, while the 3DS version is my favourite, while it addresses many flaws in the original, it creates whole new flaws on its own. The beginning of the game is slow on purpose. It's meant to be a slow burn built around the curiosity and intrigue of an island in the middle of a huge empty ocean. The ONLY island, and it's a veritable paradise. No one dies, no fisherman is ever recorded having been lost at sea. They always come in with a harvest of fish. There are some stories of monsters in the past, but no direct history of Estard actually having a monster invasion since its founding. Nor any wars to speak of. It is in every sense, a literal Eden. The issue I think a lot of people have with the start, is the excessive dopamine addiction probably 80~90% of the population in the US and EU have. Whether it's because of social media, whether due to the nature of commercials and the well studied effects of short-term attention spans created by excessive TV watching. Whether it's created by the multitude of Freemium games that use simple-yet-sadistic skinner-box mechanics to hook people into them like addicts, or the cheap one-time purchase games with added content you need to repurchase that utilize skinner-box dopamine hits at a higher rate than most games, or the sad reality of loot-box games that started with Diablo, and which most MMO's hooked and dragged to them, over time with each subsequent MMO making those drops easier and easier to obtain, generating more and more consistent dopamine hits (especially with WoW, which was the first MMO to virtually guarantee rare drops from bosses, creating the need to "roll" for said item or pass it up depending on who needed/could equip). This was a drastic shift from maybe 1 in every 100~1000 battles for the good truly rare drops, and matched more closely to Diablo 2's model of constant, but not too constant, rares, especially from bosses. Then you have another intrinsic issue some people have with DQ nowadays that wasn't an issue in time's past. The ability to put oneself in the shoes/mind of the protagonist at will, without the story generating so much emotional draw, trauma, and non-stop action and suspense to force that connection. With the advent of CD games, this changed the nature of RPG storylines, especially since FF7. That created the Cinematic RPG, and it's a trait WRPG's have adopted almost wholesale, with a few minor exceptions in that it's only a slight adoption (Fallout New Vegas, Knights of the Old Republic, looter games with stories like Dungeon Siege and Torchlight). This is something Dragon Quest, despite general presentation, doesn't adopt, despite each subsequent game, especially starting with DQ7, drastically increasing the number of cutscenes (and except for a few here and there, almost ALL of them are in-game engine based....dear lord DQ7 PSX's 3 FMV cutscenes are cringe beyond cringe, memorable, but like an Ed Wood movie is memorable). Most gamers just lack that ability to tap into that. Then again role-playing in school in its old form, of roleplaying different jobs, or roleplaying different scenarios, isn't as prevalent. It's more about roleplaying different "races" or "sexes," which doesn't allow for the fantasy of a different world, a different way to look at life. Nevermind the cutting of arts programs in schools in the US especially, since the 1980's. Now sports programs (and schools get about 3~10x the amount of money now than they did then...makes you wonder where it all goes). There's also the kids growing up in the 90's and 00's, and how many of them lacked parents, and were in daycare centers. These kids inherently lack the ability to identify with others, including with other types of roles, such as a job, and do not generally seek to do so. Meaning their creative center is essentially cut off. I'm sure that has to factor greatly into the ability to isolate the self and transmogrify the brain and sense of place into the game without being forcibly swept along with a constant dopamine adrenaline rush storyline. Something DQ's just cannot create, as they're slow adventure's with some cutscenes in between a lot of traveling. It's very old-school in that sense, and 7 more than any other with traveling back and forth. Then there's time, and how many gamers are busier now than at any point in the past. Houses are made with more easily destroyed materials, causing a lot of breaks and fixes (which is good in that it keeps aspects of the economy going, and there is at this point, a sense we've taken this too far, and should be making slightly more durable materials, as the overwhelming number of required fixes is beyond both the number of people who can afford it, and the number of people able to do the job...such as the reality at least 3 in every 10 houses has a water leak due to broken pipes underground, which can be VERY expensive, over 10~15k, in some areas over 50~80k due to HEAVY regulations). Then work, kids, family issues. More grandparents are in a state of perpetual sickness and inability to function, and at FAR earlier ages than in generations past (a lot of 50 and 60 year olds today look like 80+ year olds pre-depression, and are even LESS able to handle normal life functions than a 90 year old in the depression era). So it's a lot of time, weight, and limited patience. This probably has the greatest impact on older gamers. @Bob_the_Almighty pointed out to me in several conversations, and at several points on these forums, as well as others (like GameFAQs), that he's no longer interested in a 70+ hour game. He doesn't have the time, and would rather play a 20~40 hour game, even if he knows he wouldn't enjoy the experience as much. He'd rather games be more compact and get to the point, while telling a good story, have solid and fun gameplay, etc. So I think this as well plays a significant part. One has to WANT to sit down and slowly play through a game that clearly indicates from the getgo, that this is a long haul. Nevermind tacking in kids, the various bills we now pay (how many insurance agencies do we have to consider now, and how many "protective" services do we pay for now compared to 10 years ago, nevermind 20+?). There's a LOT to pay attention to now, a LOT more to take up our time, and drain our energy in just daily life. Nevermind all the "threats" left and right people have to consider and account for, and budget for, and prepare for future events. This game isn't conducive for that sort of lifestyle unless you willingly choose to engage. At least the 3DS does allow tracking, but some people still won't want that continued play to last that long, so I'm sure for some it becomes more frustrating as they'd rather things move along more speedily. There's a general lack of awe, of curiosity, of wonderment in today's society. Everything is so fast paced. So overwhelming, and full of constant dopamine drips. Nevermind general mindsets crafted in the forge and fires developed for the younger generations when I was in High School, or the precursors to that when I was a child. It's an uphill battle to climb for a game like DQ7. One where just 20 years ago, this game would have been praised for the 3DS version (especially if it had the puzzle elements from the PSX version restored, and easier transit to and from islands in between time zones...like Zoom spots in the past, and automatic Zoom locations for each past-location that appears in the present). ====== I won't get into other complications, such as certain people's needs for EVERY game to have a grey area (complex motivations for every bad guy, and little to no acceptance for something to be evil because it enjoys it...it's like no one believes Psychopaths actually exist, nevermind the concept of Demons and even just entertaining what they are, beyond how Atlus portrays them as potential allies, which is more acceptable apparently, than the historical context in literally every single culture since the dawn of time, because it's a grey area mindfield rather than black and white). There's a LOOOOT of various elements in human psychology I could cover, that is more consistent with today's world, and how DQ7 especially, but DQ in general fits in with that, but I'm not. I do want to get back to doing stuff, and this has taken 4 hours out of my day so far with the multiple rewrites. ======= Issues with Dragon Quest VII (both versions) from a gameplay perspective (I had a long as fudge list before I started writing the above, and it now escapes me): Very limited information on how classes work. Especially the nature of upper classes, monster classes, pre-requisites, hybrid skills for the original 3DS opening being streamlined is a VERY good thing, however, the lack of the puzzles which introduced much of what was to come, including some foreshadowing elements of the later storyline, oversimplifies to a point of literally dumbing down the original intent (this was almost certainly due to lack of time to complete...they only worked on DQ7 3DS for 3~4 months, compared to DQ6, which is less than 1/10th the actual size in terms of general content, having 10~11 months...it took them that long to rewrite the PSX code, then revise the dev kit and tweak it to maximize the 3DS, and likely a very strict development period/cost). Shard finding in the original was a hassle, which the 3DS fixes with multiple avenues to pinpoint, including the game map on the lower screen. 3DS lack of Padfoot, and no Vanish-like spell makes it very difficult to navigate dungeons without getting into constant battles (PSX battle counts per dungeon crawl are considerably lower). Combine this with a +50% EXP rate, and a much faster human class growth rate, and you've got a recipe for being overpowered fast. The adjustments to enemies in the 3DS do not account for any of these changes, rendering any challenge virtually impossible. It might be very streamlined, but several sections in the original, especially concerning Dune/Al-Balad, are confusing for a lot of players. The first post-game dungeon requires finding a special shard in a well during the ending sequence, in Estard castle, which is EASILY overlooked, and in the original PSX version, that shard had to be taken underground in Estard, and placed in this lone chest on a ledge. It's a fairly long ending sequence, and in the PSX in general, a fairly large final dungeon with puzzle rooms (good puzzles, but one of them takes awhile to get through as you touch certain parts of the wall that automatically carry the party to particular positions, and if you take or accidentally touch the wrong one, that can take awhile to get back to the start, and choose the right path again). At least the 3DS version just requires picking up the Shard/Fragment. No explanation for the interplay of functions, such as which special weapon attributes work with what. There's a LOT, and a LOT of surprising function exchange. As well with damage buffs. Given the sheer volume of skills, it's hard to figure out for most players, and the game offers no guidance or even awareness this is so. Though this is DQ in general, and only since DQ9 have we seen any attempt to address this, and it's through quests...unfortunately a lot of people do not pay attention to these quests and fail to grasp the nature and purpose of the gameplay teaching quests...most of which is to encourage experimentation as they clearly indicate this is just ONE option available of many. DQ's since 6 have a LOT of layers of gameplay stacking, surprising amounts, especially in 7 and 9, that almost no player, even major DQ fans, are even aware of (thus people like me are needed, lol, and it seems a common thing in Japan to unlock abilities). Less an issue in the original game, more in the 3DS. The need for a Zoom function in the past, and carry-over of Zoom places into the present. The PSX original has a world map (in the 3DS, the map used for vehicles) that is about 1/4 the size of the 3DS map in scale. However, the actual area map in the 3DS where characters run, is about 500x larger than in the original game. Even accounting for running speed, it takes MUCH longer to get from place to place. So without Padfoot, without Vanish to cut down on enemy spawns in the past, and with the one shoes that boost running speed only boosting it by about 20%, the lack of instant Zoom really exacerbates the game's requirement of returning to old haunts a second time in the Present. Not that this is a bad thing to have that return, as you'd clearly have new items to find, but it takes so long each time, after each repeat, that it becomes a bit tiresome for most. I love it, but if I'm in a hurry, it's not fun, if I'm able to take my time, I thoroughly enjoy it. Doesn't help that the map layout is overly simplistic, unlike DQ8, and each island spawns on its own, so resource management is very inefficient (they load all battle data along with the islands in 7, in 8, they flush and reset them in RAM...and this would be a non-issue if they patched the New 3DS to make use of the extra RAM and processing power for both games, nevermind the extra buttons). A lack of purpose in some present day towns. Some have a bit of story or some fun mini-game (or for some, an annoying simple mini-game that leads to maybe something useful, like the Big Book of Beasts). Would have been nice to have a scenario like in DQ6's first lower-world town, such as the temporary Kidnapping event. Or a monster attack on some town (like after the Dig Site opens up, there should have been some towns that needed help for some extra items). 3DS extras, the tablet creation system, is rushed and needs a lot of work. Would be nice to have stuff like upgrade stones won from battle, and boss level factors into what stones etc. Would be a nice way to include the style forge -> alchemy pot -> DQ11's forge into DQ7, and give a grander purpose to the tablet system. As well as expanding on boss powers and abilities (and base monster abilities). No tying of wisdom to magical damage/healing. Would have been nice to see that addition from DQ8 brought into DQ7 and 6, as magic is just not up to snuff in those games, especially middle and late game. ...so many, if I recall the original list I had in my head, I'll write up some more. It's a great overall game, but a very flawed game. Quite enjoyable though, and the vignettes especially, the way they're written and the details and variety of storylines makes for a very intriguing and for me, a very engaging emotional ride. Even now I find myself tearing up at a few lines here and there (like Sharkeye's lines about his son).
  12. DQ2 Small = 1, 2, 4~5. DQ2 Medium/Large = 1, 2, 3. Small = 1, 2~3, 4~5, 6~8. Medium 1, 2~3, 4, 5. Large 1, 2, or 3. <- so DQ3/4 and maybe 5. Most of the other games is just guessing based on trial and error testing, and Sk8er's DQ3 info. I'll get to the rest of the post later. Try to anyway.
  13. Nicely done! Not something you typically think of, but Dragon Quest 2 has only one actual Dragon! Interesting to note the stat differences, and I never knew the FC original and NES versions had nearly the EXP difference they have. They definitely made the iOS/Droid/PS4/3DS/Switch version the easiest of all. I mean talk about streamlined and rebalanced, that's pretty heavy compared to the SFC and especially the GBC, let alone the NES. Cool stuff, I rather enjoyed the FAQ. There are more differences in specific damage and healing output, but that suffices (even differences in the output of certain spells when specific equipment is used in battle). There's even a difference in the number of Seeds available of each type, though I have no clue on the iOS/Droid/PS4/3DS/Switch placement and availability, only the SFC and GBC: https://gamefaqs.gamespot.com/boards/378081-dragon-warrior-i-and-ii/67500239
  14. I think it's a worthy thing to look into to get the specifics on the algorithm and formation data. I could be wrong in individuation from 5 onward, and it maintains group orientation. What surprised me is he didn't include certain data he uncovered when he first dug into it, similar data to what Paulygon had initially found. Related to how if you have Enemy A, there's a % chance to spawn another Enemy A or Enemy B. Which when further dug into, the number of instances of 100% for Enemy A #2, and maybe #3, and maybe #4, indicated a group orientation, but he never posted anything in between first figuring out the individual in-battle slots and how individuals are chosen, then how he wrote the FAQ, which was after doing a lot of further digging. I'll see if I can't find Sk8er's posts sometime later, related to this. Some of them were in a few nfrazee topics, a few others in topics made by others. I don't know if I kept track of that. If I find them, I'll post them here.
  15. Formations in DQ aren't like in FF and Tales. They're not fixed from 2 onward. 1 is fixed clearly, as it's 1 monster per battle. DQ's, since 2, work on a randomization basis, 2~4 go by groups and individuals, 5 onward goes by individuals only. Battle triggers, RNG rolls for initial monster. DQ's 2~4 will roll for a certain group type for that monster depending on size. DQ2 Small = 1, 2, 4~5. DQ2 Medium/Large = 1, 2, 3. Small = 1, 2~3, 4~5, 6~8. Medium 1, 2~3, 4, 5. Large 1, 2, or 3. DQ3 mobile/ios/droid/ps4/3ds/switch changes this to more fixed values on SOME maps. Small = 1, 2 or 3, 4 or 5, 6 or 7 or 8, and so on. DQ's 2~4 will then roll for adjacent monsters depending on available slots. Available alternative monsters are based on % values. In the mobile port of 3 and all versions of 3 beyond the mobile (iOS/Droid/PS4/3DS/Switch), these are fixed values on certain maps for certain enemies. So you actually get something that looks much closer to FF lineups on some maps. Like 2 Archmages + 2 Liquid Metal Slimes on certain maps such as the first floor of Zoma's Castle. What used to be 2~3 is now a fixed 2 LMS, and what used to be a multitude of potential spawns with a multitude of potential enemies, is now a fixed 2x Archmages. However this is not consistent on every map for every enemy. In most cases for 4 especially, even in the remakes, if a group count of 4~5, and there's enough space for 1 large, 2 medium, or 3~4 small, the game will roll for those extra spaces to be filled up, and based on the main monster picked, there's a % chance for each individual monster that's available, in some cases 1 or 2 monsters are the only potential selection, in other cases it's a wide variety. Typically one monster has a VERY high % chance to spawn with another, and may only be allowed to spawn a certain count, so if there isn't room, it won't spawn, if there is room, it will almost certainly spawn. DQ's 5+ Battle triggers, RNG rolls for an initial monster. 9, 7+8 3ds, 11 the initial monster you just get to see. RNG rolls for next monster based on relationship with initial monster, priority on same monster. This often ends in similar setups. It's even more fixed in the DS versions than the originals. The % values much higher, so it generally assures virtually identical make-ups, even with a slightly different system. If it's a 70% chance you'll get 3 Weaken Beacons in a row, and a 1% chance anything else spawns, or a 0% in some cases, and a 10% if only 2 Weaken Beacons are rolled, for a different monster, while it's like a 70% for that third, so almost every Weaken Beacon battle is 2 or 3 of the same monster, and almost never, except in some cases, with another. As to where you can find a resource that breaks this down? Only for DQ3. You won't find it for any of the others, as once DQ2 came out, and the general formation building system was uncovered, and it's only been slightly tweaked since, Japanese coders don't really care, because they're not absolutely fixed values like most other JRPG's, so you will never find a DQ site that covers this, as it's too much information, and info that's not exactly exploitable. As for DQ3, I give you Sk8erpunq's work on DQ3 GBC (which you already linked to): https://gamefaqs.gamespot.com/gbc/450388-dragon-warrior-iii/faqs/70113 I guess my point is, you didn't quite understand Sk8er's guide. It's not saying there are fixed values. It's saying there are specific ranges of potential outcomes. It's not feasible to look into it, because it's different every area, and slightly tweaked every game, or new release of the same games. There are, unfortunately not actual real fixed enemy formations. That would require hacking the game code, learning hex, and working backward for each game, then finding the map data associated with potential ranges or % values related to each monster present, then presenting that, then the sorting algorithm that determines initial monsters, which group size type, what count range in that size, then what alternative monsters if any, will spawn, and what range again, etc.
  16. It does. The horns and wide range of low notes to high notes with little build-up or variance is still present, but it's less pronounced. The addition of both Dragon Quest VIII's overworld theme, and the Baumrun theme when riding a sabrecat (a casino object in Act 2 in the second casino) is refreshing as well (plus you can play DQ8's music in midi format as well, and it's the PS2 rendition, not the 3DS, which is a slight plus).
  17. That's never easy. Especially as it's a new game with so much content. I adore DQ11, and it's slowly creeping up on DQ3, and may overtake it as my 2nd favourite DQ game of all time. The only game that never set well for me was DQ1. I cannot for the life of me find any enjoyment. I ADORE the music. I LOVE the flow of battle, but it ultimately feels shallow and I guess I'm not upset at the original build, as I grasp that it's a classic, but I do not appreciate the lack of consideration for expansion of content with the remakes. There's so much to tap into. They could even do raids on towns, as that was part of the story that led to the Scion of Erdrick making a trip out to fulfill the destiny of his forebear, and shine a light once again on Alefgard. So how come? What about Dragon Quest XI did you not like? Characters? Story points? How the story was told? Gameplay? Battle Flow? Minor details? The music? The overall package? Can't quite put your finger on it, just didn't click for some inexplicable reason? What did you like about it?
  18. That would be Horii's decision. I'd guess we might see a PS5 release of 1~8, the most current builds. So mobile 7 would be the most likely, and 8 with the dlc either added in directly, or tacked in through some offline system where you still connect and it auto cycles. Then that would see a Switch and PC port, probably a PS4 as well. This remains to be seen of course, but I do expect it before the next remakes. Horii isn't exactly anti-port anymore, as he was in 2000, given the iOS/Droid ports of 1~3 were so bloody lazy and half-assed slight updates to the original mobile releases. I'm wondering if he just gave his blessing to the project, but didn't oversee it.
  19. In the case of CT, they had no choice. The game was unplayable, literally. The feedback was 100% negative at the time due to the touchscreen controls being so poorly managed. Even worse was the PC release, which was the mobile port. That took time to patch in proper controls and menus. He'll be fine. He's fairly active and healthy. The death rate in Japan is fairly low, given general eating habits there are far superior to the US especially.
  20. Actually, I think they would. DQ7 3DS was a very ambitious project, but one that was so rushed and intense, Arte PIazza took a literal 2 year vacation. Usually they take 1~3 months if they do rest between projects. When the DS remake projects were announced, there was about a 1~2 month gap before the first photos, then with each subsequent game, a larger gap from first photos to release. DQ4 was about 4 months, DQ5 was about 5 months, DQ6 was about 1 year of development. DQ7 was different. It was announced, but there was almost a year between announcement and the first photos. Meaning in that time period, it took them that long to rebuild the game, rebuild the engine to take advantage of the 3DS hardware, and plan out the game. Clearly took them longer than planned, and they were obviously given a strict timeline. DQ7 had even less time between first photos and release as did DQ4 DS. There were a LOT of things they never finished, and a lot of bugs. The text format code is so interlocked to the game, the localization team couldn't separate it, so created additional code to run the Japanese text in the background, but it also runs all text at the same time, just the chosen text in the foreground. For this reason the game has heavy menu lag. That was a design decision made less so because they planned a Japanese only release, than because they didn't have time to properly code the text format data in a way where they could tweak it at a later point. That will require rebuilding it, as it's tied down to several sections of the game, causing certain bugs. The story-DLC is ONLY available in the post-game, which makes no sense for the two with boss battles, as those battles are as difficult as story fights in the Lefa/Aeolus' Vale section, and the period they're available makes no sense as they're well past their actual story points. The story-DLC has only 3 tablets. One of which implies more story to come. HEAVILY implies another tablet or three, and potential reunification is lightly implied. One is unfinished, and one connects only to Alltrades, a specific scenario, which feels very light. There are missing data sets and even party chat text. There's even a bug where sometimes certain party chat may not show up, but is there, and will at other points. Might take several resets at the church, or going in and out of the town, and talking to the same NPCs, or specific orders of NPC talk. I've found several in Probina/Providence in my last playthrough. This is clearly due to event triggers related to party chat being somewhat buggy, as it's very inconsistent when it doesn't work and text is there, and there's nothing specific to indicate why it wouldn't that I can find. There are missing and unused DLC monsters. Even unused DLC map names. The tablet reward system is very half-assed. There are certain DLC items that appear within them, while most others are DLC only, and it makes no sense. Certain new items are only locked to tablet rewards, and there are certain equipment in the normal game not present in the rewards system, and a lot of repeats, many of which make no sense as they're repeats way late, from early to mid-game monsters and mid to late game monsters. There lacks tracking of a lot of things. The page in the bag, equipment specific data when checking character on-hand items, yet shows up when the item is checked in the bag. The tablet monster picking system lacks tracking monster numbers. The buttons pressed in the graves in the start, to access the Saint equipment. The game gives an indicator for puzzles with one passage Dermott reads, implying they intended to put puzzles there, and wanted to expand the nature of the island, and give a more direct relationship between the kings of Estard and the ruins, but that was never realized. Most of the early maps are WAY too narrow, perfect for random encounters, as they're a 1:1 ratio of the original maps, then change up to wider and different, as well as different spawn rates. They didn't have time to change up certain maps to account for the spawning system. There's very little rebalancing to account for the EXP boost of +50%, except to make human classes require only 2/3rds ~ 3/4 of the battles they used to require. The rebalancing of skills and spells makes little sense. They didn't properly test them. One skill from Ruff, which has a wolf attack once, that used to deal 0.8~1.25* damage The simtown changes implied a castle at the end, and several other updates that correlate to the story of Phlegmrique, much as with DQ4's simtown. This never happens. We just get the story, and the town's development is totally separate from the sim storyline. The final upgrade at least happens after Coastal/Buccanham, but that leaves the player with a very basic town for a very long time (until Hamelia/Wetlock), than a slightly upgraded town through to the end of Coastal. That from a very complex original format. Certain bugs that are random, like Miracle Sword and the new Miracle Slash not working with Oomph at times, and othertimes working. Double-Edged Slash often factoring in boosted damage on returned damage, and othertimes it doesn't. Sometimes enemy data won't register if a summoned monster kills it. Summoned monsters also sometimes come in with previous HP data. Usually it's 100% HP, but there are times when if you finished a battle at 20% of their HP, they return with 20%, and if they die, they cannot be resummoned that battle. It's random as f, so hard to predict when it happens. I thought for awhile it was the norm. Enemy data never registers as a kill, if trailing damage kills the monster. So you'd get the monster book data outlined, but you won't get any item, any heart, and kill count would be 0 for that trailing damage (sometimes on the kill count, always on the heart and item). The last normally killed monster factors for the item or heart drop. This doesn't impact EXP, Gold. This only works as such if the only damage done was by trailing damage. So if you hit a monster with the Fire Claw, and that trailing damage finishes that same monster off, it may not count the kill, but items and drops count. If you hit and kill a monster with the Fire Claw, and it dies, and there's another monster on screen, and the trailing damage lands on that monster, and it is the only damage done to it, and it gets killed, it will probably not count as a kill, and you will not be able to get that second monster's item or heart, if they carry one, at the end of battle, assuming that was the last monster killed. This can impact boss data, so you can actually have killed a boss, and have a permanent "0" kill count. The party placement bug, which is a slight carry-over from the original game, though the original game didn't wig out and permanently lock the party out of completing the game. In this case it does, and it only relates to Maribel end-game. That's an oversight of the original build. Barns still DO NOTHING directly, though at least in this game it means you can make a tablet with 3 of the same kind. However there is a new bug related to the park that is hugely impacted by the barns. If all 282 normal game monsters are recruited and sent to the monster park, the game locks off any new monster recruits. This impacts barns that are unfilled, it impacts any monster let go from a barn, as they return to the wild in this game, not the park (it's not a bug either, it's actually stated the monster is released back into the wild, so they intended for players to rerecruit them). This means any DLC monsters not recruited, are locked out of recruitment. Well...you CAN recruit them, but the park manager will not take them in. Meaning you cannot access them in the park, and cannot use them for making tablets. They go further to imply and tease Kiefer could have returned, or they wanted him to, like the easter egg that he gains 660 Resilience exactly, on his 50th level (which is also a throwback to a rumour Kiefer was intended to be the original main boss, and became possessed by Orgodemir, who then separates from him to create a new body that looks a lot like Kiefer, thus the "almost" 666 as a tease). They went out of their way to enhance ONE puzzle, in Baloch's Tower. It's a really thoughtful puzzle as well. Used to be a spinning maze room. This implies they intended to change up the puzzles, but had little time, so just nixed certain puzzle rooms instead of reworking them. Certain skills that are still in the code (some are removed, like EagleEye), like Padfoot and Nap, but aren't present in the game. Implying they intended Nap and Padfoot to return, but couldn't work out the details, or maybe even get to them by the completion date. Certain cutscenes are the same length and have those extra moments where the player has to speak to the next person to carry things along, like several parts of Greenthumb Gardens. However, most parts are streamlined to the point where they just play out multiple cutscenes from the original as a single cutscene. Some are expanded on as well, like the Nila river scene with the water dragon that carries the party aboard it, while most others are shortened or dumbed down (or removed, like the original opening). The landscape. Very inconsistent, and poorly tested. The game loads all battle data for a given area at the same time, or they could have either a lot more trees, or far less pop-in (they'd appear further away). There are also inconsistent sections of shapeliness here and there, where a few "grasslands" have some shape to them, but almost all of it doesn't. It feels very rushed, especially in light of the mountains and critical points like towns and dungeons, which had a lot more attention. The inconsistent and odd placements of items on the world map. There isn't much thought to many of those items. A Magic Water mid-game? The odd-ball lazy maps battle maps, like the in-town map for the bandit boss battle in the prison town ruins. The low-grade textures for the grass and even walls make no sense when compared to most other battle maps. There are a few others where they clearly didn't have time to work on visual details, and just scrounged the closest approximation. While other maps are highly detailed and very active/functional. You can tell where some the clouds almost never move, and in others they're moving a lot. Some the water barely moves, or is still, and is a river, while most others it's very active movement. In battle there are only 3 settings for battle speed. Slow (very slow), fast (very fast), and player controlled (you press buttons at every new line). I had a whole list last night, wrote it up, and accidentally deleted the post before I could send it. So this is a very partial list as I'm trying to recall bits and pieces. There are a lot of other details not mentioned. Especially the DLC story aspects, the tablet creation system, the single updated puzzle vs removed puzzles, the overly simplistic puzzles or replacement of puzzles with basic button presses, the inconsistent cutscenes, and of course the township. I think they would love to go back and rework the game. Especially the puzzles. The book and Dermott imply there are puzzles and other details hidden, just like in the original. Yet there's suddenly this whole out of place burial ground. We're also told by the new imp character to pick wisely which saint equipment goes to which saint, implying we're supposed to solve the riddle, yet the game automatically selects each saint equipment, removing player involvement. It's a bit disconcerting. Some maps also have extra space, while others do not. Like the camera continues in a certain direction. In the Temple, this is to the West, the direction of the "graves" relative to the temple, implying to me they intended a passage way from the graves to the temple. It's a very incomplete game. They also need to carefully go over the bugs and missing data. Like Gabo/Ruff, I forget what level, but for HP he gets 0 as a baseline instead of 10. So someone was up late plugging in those tables to get that data dumped quickly so they could get to working on the new content and rebuild. It's so incomplete it's almost a beta. Almost. I love the new direction though, and certain elements are a vast improvement, plus the behind the back look is really fun in battle, and one of my favourite compromises with new and old DQ. The monster animations are priceless, as they really went out of their way to focus on enhancing the work they did with 4~6, especially for monster classes. It's a really good build, and a really good base, but it's clear to me they didn't have time to get it done right, or the way they wanted to. I don't doubt for a second the next iteration they would either redo a lot of things, or take what they built and complete/finalize it. Especially the added story tablets.
  21. Yet the words on the screen are written in English first, then Japanese. Not in French. This actually has the makings of a really good game storyline. I really hope Horii considers making a game based on it, or uses some elements unique to this storyline ( ). Very dark concept that has a lot of room to play around with. That skull in the background of the villain's base reminds me of the ever moving castle in Krull where the dark lord resides.
  22. With names like "White Hero" and "Princess" you can't go wrong. LOL. This was clearly a completely new storyline. I wonder if it will ever be adapted to a game? Sugiyama's music translates well to ballet. There are elements from DQ's 1, 3, 4, and 5 all rolled into this.
  23. Blue is better, but why not Red! We've already had green and blue, let's see blood red hair, and a dark backstory (hero was the son of the devil).
  24. Well, there is the challenge of making a Super Kiefer save, and exploit an easter egg with your other characters starting at level 1 from just prior to Alltrades, with some advantages (like all the DLC equipment obtained early, and a plethora of monster hearts)...to essentially create a perfect save where it's much easier to develop your own challenge. Dharma/Alltrades at level 1 (done this a few times), is rather painful, even with the gear the game provides at that point through the Casino (and easier to exploit Lucky Panel). Definitely allows for a rougher challenge than the original, especially if the Slimetree Forest map is exploited for class leveling. Taking on Dune/Al-Balad as early as level 11 is REALLY rough going, especially as Seto's Massacre attack no longer targets himself, so it only hits your party members. Plus the challenge of using Kiefer solo to obtain all the DLC items, nevermind getting him to level 99, especially with only one cartridge and relying on either DLC maps or player traded maps (abusing Slimetree Forest for trades), presents its own challenge, while allowing more usage of Kiefer than in the original game, more time spent with him for those who wish he stuck around. Just to note, the main issue for the 3DS is the time gap in development. They had to: 1) retool the original development kit for the 3DS 2) rebuild the entire PSX game from scratch for the Square-Enix servers, which took a lot longer than previous remakes given how much content was in the original game They clearly had a lot of ambitions for DQ7 3DS to boot, so a lot of those elements went into the retooling for DLC connectivity and street pass functionality unique to DQ7 3DS and separate from the 3DS system's street pass functionality. Each of the games as they released, once they rebuilt the game for SE's database, before remaking 4, 5, 6, and 7, game development actually started. With 4~6 they clearly didn't require much retooling given DS architecture and capabilities weren't much different from the PS1, a bit more powerful, like buffers and some basic shaders, but overall not much more more powerful. So you'd see this time window of each game, each being larger, going from 4~6, having larger and larger windows between first screens and release. 4 was like 5 months, 5 was like 6 months, 6 was like 1 year. 7, was 3 months. The amount of grunt work and obvious time limitation combined with excessive workload and excessively ambitious additional content is probably the reason Arte Piazza took a 2+ year break from game development afterwards. Something they had never done (at most a 6 month break). Some of the telltale signs are spells in the game still, but unfinished, so unused, like Padfoot. The size of hallways early game vs late game in general (some exceptions like the time room), where certain later game maps with narrow halls have lower spawn rates and larger distances from the party for new spawns, than earlier dungeons (Litorud/El Ciclo dungeon versus Engow/Emberdale's dungeon). The obviously rushed temple and gravesites having simple buttons. Certain bugs inherent to all versions. The Japanese text and format code integrated into the game in a way the localization team couldn't figure out how to decouple it, or even decouple all language format codes, so all international releases load ALL format code and languages at the same time, thus the menu lag, but no lag in animations in battle, on maps, or moving around on maps. The fast-track to the Monster Munchies early game, and even the overly simplistic changes to The Haven, compared to its original form. Even the storyline surrounding Phlegmrique is surprisingly basic compared to even DQ4's town map, which they attempted to copy to some degree, and the implication for The Haven, was for a castle town at the end, not what we ended up with. The fact that only certain DLC equipment shows up as player-made Tablet rewards, not all of it, and it's inconsistent as to which, that some of the new items are only available as tablet rewards, and there are a lot of unused DLC monsters. That certain DLC monsters cannot be recruited. The nature of tablet creation having certain limitations that suggest they didn't have time to account for ranges of monster types (most have only 3 of a single type, some 2, but a few have 4 and with the DLC groups, 5 and 6 of the same type, making it impossible to make a properly themed map of a single type, or even with multiple types, despite the DLC compositions often being thematically consistent). That certain pieces of normal in-game equipment do not show up as Tablet rewards, and quite a few are repeated. The nature of leveling tablet bosses, and what it does. The simplistic nature of the tablet chest rewards. Lack of properly tested balancing shifts. Some were well thought through, like the lower tier breath attacks. The changes to certain level-based skills, and using the same changes throughout was a very bad move. One of Ruff's special attacks has no special function, and just does 100% damage, with no chance for a critical, negating its purpose except for the visual. The +50% EXP increase, and class rebalancing (I'm not talking about the lack of carry-over with intermediate and advanced human classes, I'm talking about the skill and spell list changes, where Monster Masher is WAY too OP having the strongest cost-free fire breath attack). The selection of new skills ignored map-based skills, which would be required for the on-map spawning monsters. Vanish would have been very useful. Not having Padfoot is a huge detriment, and I have to wonder if they weren't able to figure out how best to use it, or make it work properly before release, and focused on other things. The missing data plots of stat growth, which is indicative of long-nights staying up trying to get those stats plugged in properly, and being tired, making mistakes (like a 0 where there should be a 10, a 6 where there should be a 9, and so forth, but mostly it's 0's instead of a 10). The overly complicated level up modifier doesn't help either. That was very ambitious, but poorly implemented to punish heavy seeding. The lack of bag searches, something intrinsic to the original. Despite tweaking the bag's to pop out and be wide enough for the character's to put their arms in, ala DQ8. The changes to certain town layouts to simplify those towns, while others were kept virtually identical. Unlike DQ 6, where every town was altered in some capacity, or DQ's 4 and 5, where they were all expanded to some degree in general size to give it a more realistic feel. 7 had more shrinkage. Overly simplistic world map terrain. The fact there's any pop-in at all, suggests they weren't able to tweak the graphics or what is streamed to, and loaded into RAM at what points. DQ8 loads a LOT more at any one point, with higher grade textures on the world map, than does 7, suggesting 7 is loading a lot of other data...given 8's loading issues in battle, probably 7 has all battle and special menu data pre-loaded, while 8 only loads it when battles load. Given 7's special equipment menu has no load time, while 8 has some load time, 8 likely loads it when it needs to, then dumps for other data bits when it no longer needs it. There are a lot of other things. I hope they continue what they started with, as 7 3DS is a really good baseline. It just needs a lot of extra work. They could easily enhance the start of the game by having the graves lead to puzzle rooms, then the final set of graves leading to a special set of puzzle rooms that give some telltale signs of what's to come, much like one section of the original temple. Having the option to either choose the imp or place the fragments independently would have been nice. Having the other puzzles see changes, and improvements (there's one improved puzzle in DQ7 3DS, the rest are either the same, removed, or dumbed down) would be nice. A Draconian mode would also help out, as well as basic initial rebalancing. I get the idea of moving players through faster, but there are good ways to handle that: 1) assure party chat always points to the next objective...sometimes it doesn't, sometimes it does. Maybe have DQ11's in-game map and pointer system to the next objective. 2) Zoom works in the past, and past towns are Zoom points in the present, with the exception of the first two towns for the sake of story. 3) More interesting terrain design and more chests would engender more exploration, much as with DQ's 8 and 11 (and to a lesser degree, 9) 4) Padfoot restored, add in Vanish, give Padfoot to Keifer at the start, as it would explain his slipping past the guards everytime they're on the lookout. For the rest, make it a class option. Padfoot reduces how quickly enemies notice the player, and reduces spawn rate. Maybe tack in a new skill that slows down enemies on the map. 5) Tweak the hallways in the dungeons where they're too narrow, and the size or trigger box for monsters, along with their visual acuity from 180 to 150~120 degrees, and give a good 1s grace period when spawned. 6) Bonus Balls actually work on Class leveling, and increase item drop rate. Both Bonus and Bumper Bonus Balls can be found in player made Tablets as clear rewards for certain monsters. 7) Clear rewards also include upgrade materials, these upgrades can be used at a special shop in the Haven/Township/Simtown, at a certain stage only available through story attrition of a certain individual. This upgrade is more complex and comprises two elements, either a one-time upgrade per equipment, except certain rare and one-time gear, that's random and upgrades from +1~5 with a certain bonus of a certain type, or the player plays a mini-game where they can pick the attribute/s upgraded and "forge" that upgrade themselves at +1~5 based on skill and a little luck. One-time rares can have their bonus reset, and it takes more of whatever material is necessary, to apply a bonus whether random or through the mini-game. Possible to add in multiple attributes if enough material is available, but each attribute can only be upgraded a certain amount, and combined, can go up to 3 maximum attributes (including one attribute added to the equipment), where if 1 attribute, it's +5 at max, if 2 attributes, it's +3 each at max, if 3 attributes, it's +2 for 2 of them, and +3 for one.
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