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Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/09/2009 in Posts

  1. 9 points
    With work being so hectic this last summer and fall and the move of my domain to a new host, I just realized this morning that in October the Den has been up for 20 years. Funny how a hobby site has turned into such a long running establishment.
  2. 7 points
    *Mad scientist laughter* YES ! YES! *ahem* So I enjoyed playing DQ I-III on mobile. But it always bugged me that you had these nice official scripts stuck in an awful mobile port experience. Pining for the idea of a proper console experience with the official script, I looked for ways to find the script, but it looked pretty hopeless. I just came across aluigi's program quickbms and forum dedicated to extracting data from various games. He actually had a script made for DQII mobile. I guess someone asked for it a long time ago, and didn't really detail how to use the script. But I just figured it out and huge thanks to aluigi figured out that DQIII was slightly different in its compression and now have all three games ripped in both text and graphics. Sound might be a different story I'm afraid. Plans are already in motion to possibly port the script to the NES/SFC versions. dq123rip.7z
  3. 7 points
    Came up for auction, so I thew $25 at it just to see what would happen and it worked. I ended up with the domain http://dragon-quest.com/ Have it forwarding to the Main Den landing page
  4. 7 points
    This morning I caught this image of people enjoying DQ XI at Anime Expo. Everyone but this poor girl. I have dubbed her The Sad Dragon Quest Girl. From now on, she will be the face of American Dragon Quest disappointment. Here's just the face for a reaction image.
  5. 6 points
    Paced poorly? Yes. Quest flaggy? Absolutely. Bland? What? No. Seriously, there are some valid complaints out there about 7. Bland isn't one of them.
  6. 6 points
    Super Smash Bros. Ultimate director Masahiro Sakurai appeared on the launch livestream for Dragon Quest XI S: Echoes of an Elusive Age Definitive Edition today, and he and Dragon Quest creator Yuji Horii discussed how Hero got into Smash Bros., and more. Here are the highlights: It all started with Sakurai and Nintendo saying that they had a proposal, which turned out to be asking if they could add Hero to Super Smash Bros. Ultimate. The proposal itself was very detailed, and Sakurai and Nintendo spoke very passionately, saying “We want to use Hero.” There was some discussion about whether a monster could be better, but in the end they agreed upon it. From Sakurai’s side, he says that requests to add in a Dragon Quest representative have been around for a long time, but he felt it wasn’t possible. However, Nintendo approached Sakurai, saying it might be possible, and so he ended up doing the presentation proposal with the intent of working with Dragon Quest, although what from Dragon Quest would be worked out later on. If he was told ‘no’ to Hero and ‘yes’ to Slime or something like that, he’d do it, but Sakurai felt Hero was the best option. That said, he did know that there would be many hurdles to working on Hero. For example, Hero hasn’t been seen fighting other characters before. And they haven’t gotten voiced before too. Sakurai was quite convinced that he’d be rejected really quickly, but the agreement came surprisingly quickly. According to the Square Enix side, it was partially because of Sakurai’s passion, and partially because the ‘best of’ element in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate was quite similar to that of Dragon Quest XI S, which brings together many elements from across the series. From Yuji Horii’s point of view, while before there was a resistance towards seeing Hero fighting other characters and other Heroes, it’s slowly become less strict, seeing as there is the smartphone game Dragon Quest Rivals, and such. With Smash Bros. being such a popular series as well, Horii wanted Hero to join. Sakurai acknowledges that there are people who hate characters like Hero who add in random elements. However, in the first place, Super Smash Bros. is an unpredictable game where you have fun and move onto the next game anyways. One particular spell Sakurai had trouble with was differentiating the Frizz line of spells (neutral B) and Sizz/Sizzle (via Command Select). He had to look up how the spell functioned in the original games, and how Frizz would float out to hit the enemy, while Sizz would fly quickly and sear the enemy when it hit the enemy. Making the Yggdrasil’s Altar was indeed very troubling, to the point Sakurai thought of giving it up. Some other alternatives included the volcano. In the end, they decided upon the altar as it would show the world tree that symbolizes Dragon Quest XI. The world map as seen in the stage references the world map in the PlayStation 4 version, but otherwise is made entirely from scratch. image: https://www.siliconera.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/horiisakurai2_thumb.png Originally, there were only two Heroes set to join Smash Ultimate, being Erdrick and Eleven. But Horii later said it would be fine to have four Heroes join. According to Sakurai, he was ready to make eight different Heroes, but that wasn’t a realistic option. After Erdrick and Eleven, the hero of Dragon Quest VIII was decided as he was popular overseas. However, popularity wasn’t the only factor, as then the hero of Dragon Quest V would be included. But that Hero wasn’t known for using swords, but rather staffs. In the end, it came down to either the hero of Dragon Quest I or Dragon Quest IV, but as there wasn’t a unified image for Dragon Quest I’s main character across media, IV was decided upon. image: https://www.siliconera.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/horiisakurai3_thumb.png Q & A part The two directors were asked about what sort of job being a game designer is. For Sakurai, he feels it’s all about bringing together that sort of “fun” which is usually intangible and subjective into a product. For Horii, it’s something from a more practical angle, as in game designer = game creator. Regarding the good or fun points of being a game designer in terms of the work itself, Sakurai finds it nice when he’s working on something alone, as he’s usually in the director role and talking to people. Instead, it’s more fun or interesting for him when he’s working on inputting data and the like, especially the moment there are successful results. For Horii, as an RPG creator he loves the part where he’s setting the stats and characteristics of battles. Are there any secret techniques to coming up with ideas? No, according to Sakurai. He’s the type to work under pressure, and he approaches his work not in an imaginative approach (like coming up with imaginary movesets beforehand) but rather, thinking more task-like such as, “Okay, what should be the moves, which also manage to have Dragon Quest characteristics?” For Horii, he’s the type to get a lot of inspiration from other media, which transform into other ideas for his works. Sakurai is instead the type to get inspiration by playing many games, such as Dragon Quest Walk, The Legend of Zelda: Link’s Awakening, and Borderlands 3 for recent examples. How does he fit in so much game time? He plays games while doing other things like watching Netflix, or gaming while riding the aerobic bike. Are there any rules or policies they set for themselves as game creators? For Sakurai, while it’s quite an obvious one, it’s to think of what the players want. However, player opinions vary a lot. Overall, he tries to go for a wide range of players, but still keeping a certain amount of depth. For Horii, while it’s something similar, it also has to be fun to play for himself. How does Sakurai keep his work life and private life separate? The answer according to Sakurai is that he doesn’t think too much about it. It’s not that he thinks they are the one and the same for him, though. Sakurai has other hobbies like going driving, although he doesn’t want to make a driving game. For Horii, he’s more relaxed, until meetings where he sort of shifts into working mode. image: https://www.siliconera.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/hero1_thumb.jpg Director Advice The two directors were finally asked if there is anything they’d like advice on from each other. Sakurai went first, and asked about a certain dilemma that’s bothering him. When making a game like Dragon Quest XI that has such a large volume of content, how do you outdo it or go one step beyond for the next game? According to Horii, it’s not really a dilemma, as he doesn’t worry too much about outdoing each game in content, but it’s when he adds in all the ideas, the game just ends up really large in scale. So he just focuses on adding in the ideas he has. For Sakurai, he’s uncertain what to do next if there is a next game in the series. He’s making the current one with the mindset that this is the last one, and he thinks that it might be impossible to top this one, both cost-wise and expectations-wise. image: https://www.siliconera.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/horiisakurai4_thumb.png Horii had a more lighthearted question for Sakurai: Usually Sakurai is seen as a very reserved person, but does he ever take off that mask of stoicness, and what does he find fun? Sakurai laughed and said yes, he does, both privately and in his work. For example, in Kid Icarus Uprising, Pit and Palutena are always trading jokes, and that was all written by him as well. “I’m not that serious of a person!”, said Sakurai. Of course, as a game director, he puts on a stoic mask, and might say harsh things to his staff, but Sakurai thinks that if people were actually that serious, they wouldn’t be able to make fun games. He does acknowledge he has some trouble showing off that fun side of him though, and even demonstrated a big “Yatta!” on the stream. Super Smash Bros. Ultimate is available on Nintendo Switch. Dragon Quest XI S: Echoes of an Elusive Age Definitive Edition just released in Japan today for Nintendo Switch, and will release tomorrow in the West. I beat @Dakhil on posting something DQ news article related wise? What’s up with that? 😜
  7. 6 points
    Haha. And eight years later I see this. Over 22,000 subscribers strong now. More than half have joined in the past year.
  8. 6 points
    They just announced it here: Prize is a Slime plushie and a poster signed by Yuji Horii. There was eight winners total. I think I’m the only Den member who won? Either way, REPRESENTING.
  9. 6 points
    I'm sorry that I just noticed this topic. #1 - I'm sorry, but no one here is going to be able to help. That's not me being a jerk, that's just the reality of it. I'm a teacher and have had some mild experience with this kind of thing before, but online help can make you feel better a bit, but there's nothing we're doing that's going to really help much. You need help IRL. Please, please, please, let someone at school know about this. Talk to a guidance counselor. Talk to a trusted teacher. There's going to have to be some sort of intervention (and I've got no idea what - family counseling, ...?) to make this in any way better. YOU need to be the one to start this as you're already showing signs of needing that attention. Get help. Get it today. Talk to someone you know today. Please.
  10. 6 points
    Short on time. Will expand later. As I've mentioned in the past, we as consumers have the right to vote with our wallet. Being a comic fan, there are certain creators I don't support, not necessarily solely because of their views, but how they treat others. A comic is different, though. It has a creative team of 1-6 people. Games can have hundreds. If people are truly offended by Sugiyama's views, if they don't want to support the game, that's their choice. Though I see many in the gaming press and punchlines like ResetEra using Sugiyama for shallow virtue signaling. This gives the series bad press it doesn't deserve. It cast so much of a shadow that Square Enix had to give a PR apology. Out of everyone working on the titles, Sugiyama is the least involved, and he's done less and less with every title. While I don't like his views, it's not fair to punish the hundreds of coders, modelers, and testers.
  11. 6 points
    1) Only in the West does anyone really care, and even then it's a very small, but often vocal minority that frankly I can't stand anymore, as they make a mockery of "liberalism," having neither the balls to look themselves in the mirror for their hypocrisy, nor any shred of integrity of their beliefs...thus they constantly devolve into ever smaller and smaller groups looking for more and more problems to solve or conspiracies in the walls out to get them...OMG...THE PAINT IS WHITE...IT'S WHITE PRIVILEGE...OH GOD HELP US...WAIT WE DON'T BELIEVE IN GOD...OH SCIENCE DAMN YOU WH...OH WE DON'T BELIEVE IN SCIENCE ANYMORE...OH SOCIAL JUSTICE TENANTS SAVE US FROM THE PAINT ON THE WALLS...PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE...OMG IT'S OPPRESSING ME...IT'S OPPRESSING ME *SOBBING...MORE SOBBING* I NEED MY SAFE SPACE NOW...*CURLS INTO A BALL* (liberalism requires absolute respect for free speech first and foremost, all other things follow after, so no true liberal in any sense of the word would care about Sugiyama's beliefs in terms of his work or anything he's related to, only his actions based on those beliefs as actions have real meaning and impact). I have no respect for the opinions or life of anyone who gives a hoot about Sugiyama's words. I care if he takes direct action, like advocates for Trans people to be put in concentration camps or denied basic rights. Other than that, as abhorrent as they are, they are words, and words mean only what you want them to. 2) Most civilians don't actually care, it's only those who indulge in identity politics, but that's due to forced indoctrination in schools since the 1970's, though in colleges since the 1950's. Though the original identity politics was at least about true equality. So I respect what I was taught, because it was just that white or black or gay or straight or whatever...who cares, let people be as they are. Self defense only if someone tries to force their political crap on you. Then just argue it out, unless they're idiots, in which case, walk away. If they physically need you to believe their world view...fight back. That was it. Plain and simple. Liberalism at its purest. Then it changed to Political Correctness and just devolved into the crap we see today. Mindless droning on with repetitious statements. Mass mobs where literally not one person is willing to talk or listen. People playing so hard into identity politics, now suddenly we're back to a point where we have to separate people again? For what purpose? For rights people already have that they claim they don't...oh, you mean special privileges from people where 80+% had nothing to do with your familial plight in the past, and most of whom have the same slavery bs in their history, but we just focus on one group? Whatever dude, get over yourself. Most don't want to defend someone like Sugiyama, but are forced to when dumbshits give a rats behind when someone has a stupid opinion but can't do anything specific about it because the whole of his/her country (or near enough) couldn't care less. 3) Japan doesn't care, as they take generally 1950's viewpoint on personal opinions versus work, which is the same way most liberal and conservatives in the US tend to think (except for those who actually care about identity politics). 4) Assuming SE should care, because it's supposed to be some modern age where we now have "right think" and "wrong think," not positions one can make their mind on, they still can't do anything and their hands are tied because Sugiyama owns the musical rights through his company Sugiyama Kobo. This means if they part ways, and if SE wants to release any Dragon Quest from that point forward, they would require a new composer, and would require remaking every composition from scratch, and not one of them can sound like the original music. The only things we would have access to are the already released copies of games and any CD the company Sugiyama Kobo decides to release. All digital versions would be scrapped and changed before rerelease to the new revisions. So essentially if SE did cut ties, they would be totally #$*!ed. They have to wait for him to retire and that's that. Any action to the contrary would kill the series in Japan. I don't think for one second the Japanese people would appreciate having someone condemned who is well respected (for their work), and I don't think for one second they would be happy replaying older DQ releases with new music, or new DQ releases with music that doesn't sound remotely like Dragon Quest so as to avoid a potential theft lawsuit from Sugiyama Kobo, which would likely happen even after his death, due to bad blood after having ties cut. Sugiyama isn't even an SE employee anyway, so even if they wanted to directly impact his life to quell things, they couldn't. 5) Square Enix owes the LGBTQ community nothing. Literally nothing. Sugiyama is Sugiyama, SE is SE. In capitulating and somehow doing something to "make amends" they become complacent and inherit guilt by default. They essentially claim ownership of his own words and opinions. Nevermind any concept would be giving into a certain entitlement culture. What's next, a son says he didn't like his mom's baking so she gets compensation? Are we only supposed to say things now that make people feel better about themselves? How far does that go? We've already seen where PC culture has headed in the West, and NONE, not ONE SINGLE DROP is remotely good. Not even a shred. It is evil, because it forces everyone into a sense of worry that anything they might say is somehow going to be taken the wrong way. So we start this same bs in Japan? No thank you. I want the culture dead gone and buried, because it doesn't belong. You don't get to demand compensation when someone says words you don't like. If this were a common practice, no one would be able to own anything, you'd be paying out the ass each month, and any payment gotten would be given out the next second. Nevermind it opens up the door for anyone to find anything hurtful or "hate" speech or a "hate crime" or "offensive." Here's a protip on life for those who don't get it. Offense is taken, not given. Everyone in this world will eventually meet someone who will be offended by the very fact you exist. That you wake up in the morning and take a breath of fresh air. That you make coffee. Offense for waving. Back in the 90's we learned to grow a backbone. Ok, so someone doesn't like me...whoopdie doo. They said something I find offensive...ok, maybe I'll throw some words back out, maybe I'll argue the point to convince them otherwise, or maybe I'll just not give a #$*! and walk away. Or hell, maybe I'll throw them the bird and walk away. Lots of other options.
  12. 6 points
    Our product manager played the game all the way through, barely touching sidequests, and his file is 95 hours. Mine is close to 200, but I also know I left it running a lot, so I'd estimate somewhere around 150-175 hours to platinum the game. There is SO MUCH content and even platinum trophy status didn't do EVERYTHING. Also, the "post game" is the least optional post game ever if you want a complete story. It's not a bonus. It's like a sequel built into the game.
  13. 5 points
    Dragon Warrior VII is contender for the absolute best game of all time, tied with Crash Bandicoot 2: Cortex Strikes Back and Dragon Quest X ONLINE: Rise of the Five Races
  14. 5 points
    Hello, hello! Once again, I'm playing through a Japanese DQ game and building a database of information about it. This time, I'm tackling Dragon Quest Monsters 2: Iru & Luca's Marvelous Mysterious Key on the 3DS. So far, the data I'm including are a comprehensive Monster List (including common and rare drops, scouting locations, breeding recipes, from which eggs they hatch, whether it must be traded, or WiFi gifts), Area-based monster lists, Egg hatching lists, Dream Egg hatching lists, the monsters owned by Other Countries' Masters, Monster Arena battle list, Mini Medal rewards, Costumes, and Scout Q challenges. This process is, of course, immense, as DQM2 on 3DS has 802 monsters in it; after about two weeks, I'm at 28.4% of that total (219 monsters). Also...my Japanese is rudimentary, at best. But, I managed to 100% DQ VII 3DS, DQ VIII 3DS, and DQ XI 3DS, so...I have faith I can complete this undertaking. At any rate, know that it's coming, and will hopefully be finished before DQ Builders 2 hits the shelves.
  15. 5 points
    Five years ago I asked all over the internet for help to translate the Wii game Dragon Quest Monsters Battle Road Victory and I got really discouraged by the lack of response. I am a huge Dragon Quest fan, I collect all the games in North America and all those that came out in Japan. I even collected all the various controllers, special editions, collector's editions of games, all the various consoles that came out with a Dragon Quest theme, figures and other merch I find interesting. My entire living room is a Dragon Quest museum. I have been doing this since Dragon Warrior came out. Recently, I started playing Wii games again and I was very much frustrated by the fact that I couldn't play Battle Road Victory properly (I even have the special controller that came out for it by Hori). So I asked on the facebook group Dragon Questers for help with 2 or 3 screenshots of my previous translation work to see if I could even get ONE translator or some help and I did. In the last two weeks, I have translated most of the menus, all the information screens, the hint roll outs at the bottom of the screen, made progress in finding a way to translate the dialog of the RPG mode and even found a way to translated the trading card (Way too many for me translate, theres like 315) Below are some sample screenshots of the translated stuff, and trust me when I say the word sample. Theres a lot of work thats already been done. I am posting here because I think I saw years ago someone who had most of the cards translated, and if you are out there, I'm reaching out to you. I know how you feel, not getting the required help. I feel you. Join me and the others in finally getting this project done. Meddling with the files is a lot of work, but I can do it and I can translate some stuff with my limited japanese knowledge.
  16. 5 points
    Prologue + Chapter 1 up now: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1uoRF-HcDR3U3cR23OeEMhssLF4Jd5jGj
  17. 5 points
    Out of all the words I could use to describe the DQ community, toxic isn't one of them. There aren't enough of us yet for that to be a problem, I feel.
  18. 5 points
    Took me longer than I anticipated and pastebin messed with my formatting a little, but here are the first four chapters ready to read. Chapter 1 https://pastebin.com/GyTkcH6h Chapter 2 Alena https://pastebin.com/r82b2qza Kiryl https://pastebin.com/aT37enxT Borya https://pastebin.com/v15urfzX Chapter 3 https://pastebin.com/1NZ1AvXC Chapter 4 Meena https://pastebin.com/SjxYtmUB Maya https://pastebin.com/Xu72WE4f Oojam https://pastebin.com/myYdhvNL Can't give any ETA's for chapter five, but I will be chipping away at it when I am able. If any lines are missing, let me know along with the context and I'll add them back into the main document.
  19. 5 points
    For once, Pokemon could work in their favor instead of against them: “Hey, you know how you’re all mad a large chunk of the Pokémon roster is being cut...buy DQM:J3!”
  20. 5 points
    I found this tape on a retro shop called Beep in Akihabara. It was in the junk bin surprisingly and I picked it up for my Dragon Quest collection as soon as I saw it. Now it became a rarity part for my DQ collection. I also have an old VHS player but I have to get it fixed first to watch it. I think it contains a walkthru type gameplay video but I'm not sure. I just wanted to share it with you guys.
  21. 5 points
    Saw this on the foursome channel. Perfectly sums up why I stick with the DQ fans.
  22. 5 points
  23. 5 points
    There are certain game companies I don't support and it all comes down to how the heads of the company interact with people. I'm not talking about people like Kamiya, which is mostly done for persona and laughs. It's the ones that spew nastiness and insult fans on forums and Twitter. Not only does it hurt the product, it hurts the employees. Putting "my views are my own" or some jazz in a bio doesn't absolve you when you're the face of a company. That doesn't mean you can't be passionate or outspoken. There's a certain level of responsibility people seem to be missing. Arrogance and spite have replaced constructive dialogue. Sugiyama, however, doesn't act this way at all. If you want to know his views, you have to actively seek them out. As far as I know, he's never associated his views with the Dragon Quest brand. That's what people are doing lately. It would be like saying supporting DQ supports real estate fraud because of Toriyama being named in the Paradise Papers. Both are hugely successful independent creators that are contracted to work on this series. Now if Yuji Horii was going around and saying those things and insulting people, that'd be one thing! That's not the case. Horii has always been friendly with the producers and community managers positively representing the brand. Sugiayama's views, while sad and unfortunate, is a tangent, convenient way to mar the series. So many of the people who make this stand think they're being so progressive; so woke. It's all just empty rhetoric. It doesn't help anyone.
  24. 5 points
    Did a little interview with a local magazine. Check it out!
  25. 5 points
  26. 5 points
    I've been gone from the den for a long time, and I think it's time I should come back and explain myself. Here's why: I've been extremely stressed by everyday things for the past few months, and school wasn't really helping. So far the whole year I've lost all my friends and been bullied. My depression came back (I think last year) and it got so bad that I eventually started cutting. This continued for about 5-7 weeks, until I finally told my social worker about my cutting and suicidal thoughts on the 15th of December. I had to go to the E.R and was there for the rest of the day. I'm still recovering, and i'm much better now. During that time I was stressed, I was still active on the den and said some pretty bad things. (Well extremely bad according to me) And I've also made some pretty pointless topics. So if you see anything rude or thoughtless from me, I hope you can forgive me for this. I'll try to be more thoughtful of others on the den from now on when I'm here. Sincerely, Dark Ember
  27. 4 points
    I've written several essay posts on this. Deleted each of them. I'm not sure if I really want to get into this without overcomplicating matters. Dragon Quest VII is my favourite game with good reason. It's a HEAVILY flawed game, and sadly, while the 3DS version is my favourite, while it addresses many flaws in the original, it creates whole new flaws on its own. The beginning of the game is slow on purpose. It's meant to be a slow burn built around the curiosity and intrigue of an island in the middle of a huge empty ocean. The ONLY island, and it's a veritable paradise. No one dies, no fisherman is ever recorded having been lost at sea. They always come in with a harvest of fish. There are some stories of monsters in the past, but no direct history of Estard actually having a monster invasion since its founding. Nor any wars to speak of. It is in every sense, a literal Eden. The issue I think a lot of people have with the start, is the excessive dopamine addiction probably 80~90% of the population in the US and EU have. Whether it's because of social media, whether due to the nature of commercials and the well studied effects of short-term attention spans created by excessive TV watching. Whether it's created by the multitude of Freemium games that use simple-yet-sadistic skinner-box mechanics to hook people into them like addicts, or the cheap one-time purchase games with added content you need to repurchase that utilize skinner-box dopamine hits at a higher rate than most games, or the sad reality of loot-box games that started with Diablo, and which most MMO's hooked and dragged to them, over time with each subsequent MMO making those drops easier and easier to obtain, generating more and more consistent dopamine hits (especially with WoW, which was the first MMO to virtually guarantee rare drops from bosses, creating the need to "roll" for said item or pass it up depending on who needed/could equip). This was a drastic shift from maybe 1 in every 100~1000 battles for the good truly rare drops, and matched more closely to Diablo 2's model of constant, but not too constant, rares, especially from bosses. Then you have another intrinsic issue some people have with DQ nowadays that wasn't an issue in time's past. The ability to put oneself in the shoes/mind of the protagonist at will, without the story generating so much emotional draw, trauma, and non-stop action and suspense to force that connection. With the advent of CD games, this changed the nature of RPG storylines, especially since FF7. That created the Cinematic RPG, and it's a trait WRPG's have adopted almost wholesale, with a few minor exceptions in that it's only a slight adoption (Fallout New Vegas, Knights of the Old Republic, looter games with stories like Dungeon Siege and Torchlight). This is something Dragon Quest, despite general presentation, doesn't adopt, despite each subsequent game, especially starting with DQ7, drastically increasing the number of cutscenes (and except for a few here and there, almost ALL of them are in-game engine based....dear lord DQ7 PSX's 3 FMV cutscenes are cringe beyond cringe, memorable, but like an Ed Wood movie is memorable). Most gamers just lack that ability to tap into that. Then again role-playing in school in its old form, of roleplaying different jobs, or roleplaying different scenarios, isn't as prevalent. It's more about roleplaying different "races" or "sexes," which doesn't allow for the fantasy of a different world, a different way to look at life. Nevermind the cutting of arts programs in schools in the US especially, since the 1980's. Now sports programs (and schools get about 3~10x the amount of money now than they did then...makes you wonder where it all goes). There's also the kids growing up in the 90's and 00's, and how many of them lacked parents, and were in daycare centers. These kids inherently lack the ability to identify with others, including with other types of roles, such as a job, and do not generally seek to do so. Meaning their creative center is essentially cut off. I'm sure that has to factor greatly into the ability to isolate the self and transmogrify the brain and sense of place into the game without being forcibly swept along with a constant dopamine adrenaline rush storyline. Something DQ's just cannot create, as they're slow adventure's with some cutscenes in between a lot of traveling. It's very old-school in that sense, and 7 more than any other with traveling back and forth. Then there's time, and how many gamers are busier now than at any point in the past. Houses are made with more easily destroyed materials, causing a lot of breaks and fixes (which is good in that it keeps aspects of the economy going, and there is at this point, a sense we've taken this too far, and should be making slightly more durable materials, as the overwhelming number of required fixes is beyond both the number of people who can afford it, and the number of people able to do the job...such as the reality at least 3 in every 10 houses has a water leak due to broken pipes underground, which can be VERY expensive, over 10~15k, in some areas over 50~80k due to HEAVY regulations). Then work, kids, family issues. More grandparents are in a state of perpetual sickness and inability to function, and at FAR earlier ages than in generations past (a lot of 50 and 60 year olds today look like 80+ year olds pre-depression, and are even LESS able to handle normal life functions than a 90 year old in the depression era). So it's a lot of time, weight, and limited patience. This probably has the greatest impact on older gamers. @Bob_the_Almighty pointed out to me in several conversations, and at several points on these forums, as well as others (like GameFAQs), that he's no longer interested in a 70+ hour game. He doesn't have the time, and would rather play a 20~40 hour game, even if he knows he wouldn't enjoy the experience as much. He'd rather games be more compact and get to the point, while telling a good story, have solid and fun gameplay, etc. So I think this as well plays a significant part. One has to WANT to sit down and slowly play through a game that clearly indicates from the getgo, that this is a long haul. Nevermind tacking in kids, the various bills we now pay (how many insurance agencies do we have to consider now, and how many "protective" services do we pay for now compared to 10 years ago, nevermind 20+?). There's a LOT to pay attention to now, a LOT more to take up our time, and drain our energy in just daily life. Nevermind all the "threats" left and right people have to consider and account for, and budget for, and prepare for future events. This game isn't conducive for that sort of lifestyle unless you willingly choose to engage. At least the 3DS does allow tracking, but some people still won't want that continued play to last that long, so I'm sure for some it becomes more frustrating as they'd rather things move along more speedily. There's a general lack of awe, of curiosity, of wonderment in today's society. Everything is so fast paced. So overwhelming, and full of constant dopamine drips. Nevermind general mindsets crafted in the forge and fires developed for the younger generations when I was in High School, or the precursors to that when I was a child. It's an uphill battle to climb for a game like DQ7. One where just 20 years ago, this game would have been praised for the 3DS version (especially if it had the puzzle elements from the PSX version restored, and easier transit to and from islands in between time zones...like Zoom spots in the past, and automatic Zoom locations for each past-location that appears in the present). ====== I won't get into other complications, such as certain people's needs for EVERY game to have a grey area (complex motivations for every bad guy, and little to no acceptance for something to be evil because it enjoys it...it's like no one believes Psychopaths actually exist, nevermind the concept of Demons and even just entertaining what they are, beyond how Atlus portrays them as potential allies, which is more acceptable apparently, than the historical context in literally every single culture since the dawn of time, because it's a grey area mindfield rather than black and white). There's a LOOOOT of various elements in human psychology I could cover, that is more consistent with today's world, and how DQ7 especially, but DQ in general fits in with that, but I'm not. I do want to get back to doing stuff, and this has taken 4 hours out of my day so far with the multiple rewrites. ======= Issues with Dragon Quest VII (both versions) from a gameplay perspective (I had a long as fudge list before I started writing the above, and it now escapes me): Very limited information on how classes work. Especially the nature of upper classes, monster classes, pre-requisites, hybrid skills for the original 3DS opening being streamlined is a VERY good thing, however, the lack of the puzzles which introduced much of what was to come, including some foreshadowing elements of the later storyline, oversimplifies to a point of literally dumbing down the original intent (this was almost certainly due to lack of time to complete...they only worked on DQ7 3DS for 3~4 months, compared to DQ6, which is less than 1/10th the actual size in terms of general content, having 10~11 months...it took them that long to rewrite the PSX code, then revise the dev kit and tweak it to maximize the 3DS, and likely a very strict development period/cost). Shard finding in the original was a hassle, which the 3DS fixes with multiple avenues to pinpoint, including the game map on the lower screen. 3DS lack of Padfoot, and no Vanish-like spell makes it very difficult to navigate dungeons without getting into constant battles (PSX battle counts per dungeon crawl are considerably lower). Combine this with a +50% EXP rate, and a much faster human class growth rate, and you've got a recipe for being overpowered fast. The adjustments to enemies in the 3DS do not account for any of these changes, rendering any challenge virtually impossible. It might be very streamlined, but several sections in the original, especially concerning Dune/Al-Balad, are confusing for a lot of players. The first post-game dungeon requires finding a special shard in a well during the ending sequence, in Estard castle, which is EASILY overlooked, and in the original PSX version, that shard had to be taken underground in Estard, and placed in this lone chest on a ledge. It's a fairly long ending sequence, and in the PSX in general, a fairly large final dungeon with puzzle rooms (good puzzles, but one of them takes awhile to get through as you touch certain parts of the wall that automatically carry the party to particular positions, and if you take or accidentally touch the wrong one, that can take awhile to get back to the start, and choose the right path again). At least the 3DS version just requires picking up the Shard/Fragment. No explanation for the interplay of functions, such as which special weapon attributes work with what. There's a LOT, and a LOT of surprising function exchange. As well with damage buffs. Given the sheer volume of skills, it's hard to figure out for most players, and the game offers no guidance or even awareness this is so. Though this is DQ in general, and only since DQ9 have we seen any attempt to address this, and it's through quests...unfortunately a lot of people do not pay attention to these quests and fail to grasp the nature and purpose of the gameplay teaching quests...most of which is to encourage experimentation as they clearly indicate this is just ONE option available of many. DQ's since 6 have a LOT of layers of gameplay stacking, surprising amounts, especially in 7 and 9, that almost no player, even major DQ fans, are even aware of (thus people like me are needed, lol, and it seems a common thing in Japan to unlock abilities). Less an issue in the original game, more in the 3DS. The need for a Zoom function in the past, and carry-over of Zoom places into the present. The PSX original has a world map (in the 3DS, the map used for vehicles) that is about 1/4 the size of the 3DS map in scale. However, the actual area map in the 3DS where characters run, is about 500x larger than in the original game. Even accounting for running speed, it takes MUCH longer to get from place to place. So without Padfoot, without Vanish to cut down on enemy spawns in the past, and with the one shoes that boost running speed only boosting it by about 20%, the lack of instant Zoom really exacerbates the game's requirement of returning to old haunts a second time in the Present. Not that this is a bad thing to have that return, as you'd clearly have new items to find, but it takes so long each time, after each repeat, that it becomes a bit tiresome for most. I love it, but if I'm in a hurry, it's not fun, if I'm able to take my time, I thoroughly enjoy it. Doesn't help that the map layout is overly simplistic, unlike DQ8, and each island spawns on its own, so resource management is very inefficient (they load all battle data along with the islands in 7, in 8, they flush and reset them in RAM...and this would be a non-issue if they patched the New 3DS to make use of the extra RAM and processing power for both games, nevermind the extra buttons). A lack of purpose in some present day towns. Some have a bit of story or some fun mini-game (or for some, an annoying simple mini-game that leads to maybe something useful, like the Big Book of Beasts). Would have been nice to have a scenario like in DQ6's first lower-world town, such as the temporary Kidnapping event. Or a monster attack on some town (like after the Dig Site opens up, there should have been some towns that needed help for some extra items). 3DS extras, the tablet creation system, is rushed and needs a lot of work. Would be nice to have stuff like upgrade stones won from battle, and boss level factors into what stones etc. Would be a nice way to include the style forge -> alchemy pot -> DQ11's forge into DQ7, and give a grander purpose to the tablet system. As well as expanding on boss powers and abilities (and base monster abilities). No tying of wisdom to magical damage/healing. Would have been nice to see that addition from DQ8 brought into DQ7 and 6, as magic is just not up to snuff in those games, especially middle and late game. ...so many, if I recall the original list I had in my head, I'll write up some more. It's a great overall game, but a very flawed game. Quite enjoyable though, and the vignettes especially, the way they're written and the details and variety of storylines makes for a very intriguing and for me, a very engaging emotional ride. Even now I find myself tearing up at a few lines here and there (like Sharkeye's lines about his son).
  28. 4 points
    Dragon Quest 7 is to me one of the best games in the series and is my personal favorite game from DQ. It isn’t perfect, but the game has so much to see and do and has some of the best town vignettes of the series. Seeing the world constantly grow thanks to your actions is very satisfying and makes your quest feel worthwhile. Definitely worth playing. But I’m a little biased towards it since I like it so much. 🤣
  29. 4 points
    Oh, they already are. Lately more and more people seem to view masks as more of a safety blanket. Wearing a mask, but the nose is still exposed. Wearing a mask, yet sipping from a Starbucks cup. Yesterday I was headed to Target and a lady just walked into the middle of the road as she was putting on her mask and gloves. That may protect you from Corona, but not CAR-ona!
  30. 4 points
    Hi Den, I submitted my first guide to GameFAQs yesterday and it got accepted!!! *squee* https://gamefaqs.gamespot.com/switch/272749-dragon-quest-ii-luminaries-of-the-legendary-line/faqs/78327 It's a comparison guide about the stat and name changes for DQ2, mostly our English versions on the NES, GBC, and iOS/Android/Nintendo Switch. I wade a little bit into the original FC version, but not so much for the SFC or its fan translations. A lot of stuff didn't change or you can find it in lists for specific versions, but I wanted to see a side-by-side comparison. I think the only really new information is probably the increased experience values for monsters in the iOS/Android/Switch versions. I didn't see them anywhere (English or Japanese websites) so I recorded them during my recent Switch playthrough (so much more fun than on my phone, god knows why).
  31. 4 points
    Hey everyone! Similarly to what I'm doing with Dragon Quest XI, I'm finally getting around to editing my initial play through of Dragon Builders 2 and figured I'd post it here as well in case anyone was interested. Also, just like DQ11, don't worry, I won't be spamming replies to the chain every time a new video is posted. But if you're curious about the play through, all videos will be located in the spoilers section below. And if you like what you see, feel free to like, comment, and subscribe! (gotta have that shameless plugging! ).
  32. 4 points
    The Unofficial Dragon Quest Roleplaying System The Unofficial Dragon Quest Roleplaying System is a tabletop RPG that aims to allow players to intimately revisit the worlds of their favorite adventures from the Dragon Quest video game series. Combining staple gameplay mechanics, locales, and monsters with well-proven conventions of dice-and-paper role-playing, above all else the game intends to combine the charm and style of Dragon Quest with the realism-to-fantasy that made successful Dungeons & Dragons so immersive. Below, I discuss what I consider my image for the game and future goals so that you may contribute your thoughts and ideas to the project. The Universe Dragon Quest has taken players on dozens of adventures through hundreds of cities, ruins, forests, caves and even subaquatic civilizations. In fact, the franchise has spanned multiple universes, and then within those universes themselves Dragon Quest games have spanned multiple worlds and then further within them multiple realms! These universes and worlds and realms viewed as a whole create what we call "The Dragon Quest Multiverse". Alefgard of the Erdrick Trilogy, and Zenithia, and the Almighty, the Dracovians, and the Celestrians are all recognized as existing simultaneously within the bounds of The Unofficial Dragon Quest Roleplaying System. However, not all of them -- nor any of them -- need to exist within any world that hosts the player's adventure. Every campaign inhabits its own independent universe inside of The Dragon Quest Multiverse, which runs by its own rules and is governed by its own laws, forces and deities and which is only connected to the rest of The Multiverse by raw chance and the mutual existence of themes, creatures and people shared only by the thread of fate. Thus, players are free to ignore or incorporate any lore from the Dragon Quest series that suits their game world and their narrative choice! The Player Character Player characters will be given a name and a a title for flavor. A section will be provided for players to freely describe hair color and style, eye color, height, weight, and their costume (the outfit the character wears inexplicable despite the equipment they carry with them). Their stats, skills and spells are defined by their Vocations. Vocations are catch-all terms which determine how characters grow stronger as they level up, what weapons they can use, what skill trees they have access to and what spells they learn. The capabilities of a character are determined by their stats. These are: Strength: the character's ability to deal damage with physical attacks. Resilience: the character's ability to sustain physical damage Agility: how fast the character can move, how likely they are to dodge Magical Might: the character's ability to deal damage with magic. Magical Mending: efficiency of healing spells Deftness: the character's ability to deal damage with ranged attacks, critical hit chance and when they act in combat. The Vocation System: All Vocations featured in the Dragon Quest series will appear in The Unofficial Dragon Quest Roleplaying System, and then some! The system present will be a reconciliation of the systems of Dragon Quest VI and VII, and that of Dragon Quests III and IX. Every player character will begin with a single Vocation. Whenever you level up, a die will be rolled to determine how many skill points you earn; these will be allocated to one of five skill trees determined by the player character's Vocation. These make the character more proficient when wielding certain weapons and allow them to gain access to new special abilities using a milestone-like format. Whenever 150 skill points are allocated, the character is considered to be a Master of their vocation. Whenever a player visits an Alltrades Abbey, they may change their vocation. When they do, their level is reset to 1, and all of their stats are equal to the value of their previous Vocation's stats halved, rounded up. This character can use any spells they've ever learned if the new Vocation has it in their spell-list. Furthermore, all Vocations use the same skill tree for a particular weapon, and any progress made in a skill tree in one Vocation will be carried over into any other Vocation that uses the same weapon. The Vocation is negligible if the character has become an Omnivocational Master of their particular weapon (100 skill points in that weapon's tree), allowing them to use the weapon as any other Vocation. Should the player become a Master of two Vocations, they have a chance of gaining access to an Intermediate Vocation, which shares qualities of the two child Vocations! An Intermediate Vocation can cast all Spells learned by the child Vocations, and will learn new ones. They, however, may not necessarily share all skill trees with their child vocations! What Else? This isn't a lot of progress, but it's a start. Unfortunately, though, making a tabletop RPG is a time-consuming process, and can take months if not years of balancing and designing. Even now, there's a lot of things I'm not 100% sure about in making this game. Included below are some goals I have for finishing the game and turning it into something playable, fair and fun. Combat -- I don't know if I'll use a traditional Dragon Quest-like turn-based JRPG format or a hex-based tactical TTRPG format. Growth -- Converting the stat growth, and determining base stats, from a video game to a TTRPG is a behemoth challenge to undertake. This also includes scaling everything to the players' growth. Out-of-Combat Skills -- I don't know how I'll determine how good a character is at tasks outside of combat. Spells -- Should I create new spells to provide more D&D-like functionality or fully retain Dragon Quest's simplistic charm? Magic Items -- How would I handle magic items on a functional level? Rolls -- Do I want to use a d20 format that utilizes all the dice or do I want to use a d100 system to replicate chances by percent? And even now, I'm probably forgetting hundreds of things I need to keep in mind for creating this game. This thread is simply to call attention to the project, and get everyone on board with what is intended as the greatest intimation of players to the world of Dragon Quest!
  33. 4 points
    Probably shouldn't be putting out so many family photos out there, you never know who has an axe to grind.
  34. 4 points
    Hey everyone, I've had this magazine for a long time, but I've never seen scans of it anywhere, so I thought I'd share it here. This was the cover story for the November 2005 copy of Play Magazine. It even has an interview with Yuji Horii in it. Enjoy!
  35. 4 points
    https://nintendosoup.com/dragon-quest-xi-s-developers-we-have-finally-fulfilled-our-promise-to-satoru-iwata/ Thank you, Satoru Iwata.
  36. 4 points
    Well, it was 2D Mode. It invokes the era of no voices in RPGs. Back in our day we didn’t have no fancy voice actin’! We made up voices in our head and we liked it that way, carnsarnit! Ahem...sorry, not sure what happened there. I actually like that we can turn voices off entirely in 3D mode and it replaces it with the classic DQ speech sound effects for when characters talk. I was really surprised by that in the demo and honestly I’m thinking of playing 3D mode at some point without the voices since the PS4 version didn’t offer that. Edit: Ok, what is with the 3D to 2D mode (and vice versa) switching? Why the hell are you forced to go back to a specific point of the game instead of it being a seamless transition from one to the other? The 3DS version let you go back and forth no problem, so why on earth did they change that in the Switch version? BUNCH OF BULL #$*!, BY COR BLIMEY! Seriously though, that’s a dumb decision.
  37. 4 points
    As many of you know Slime Mori Mori 3 / Rocket Slime 3 got fan translated this year on August 1st. It's the Beta, but really it's 100% translated, they just threw it out there for fans to finish bug checks. Recently I put down an offer on a Japanese copy of the game and an ebay seller and I worked something out... So, now I've got the game up and running and let me tell you, the game is as fun as the other two. Granted, I'm only about an hour into it, but damn it's addicting. I'm going to use this thread to document my time with the game and be a somewhat walkthrough of sorts. So far here's what I've done: 1. The game opens with you on a ship. You learn the standard stretch and launch yourself attack. 2. You land at the castle town and need to gather wood to fix the ship. This provides an introduction how to hit items up into the air and collect them. 3. When you go to the castle, stuff goes down with Don Clawleon again and he steals some Rainbow orbs. Of course the king needs YOU to go get them. 4. You hop on your boat and steer it towards Flat Desert, where the first orb has turned a Sphinx into a big bad guy. 5. You land at a pretty sparse desert town and it's time for the first dungeony area. You make your way through just like the other games, hitting things up into the air, catching them and throwing them on empty train cars that take them back to town. 6. You and each train car can hold up to 3 items at a time. There are tons of treasure chests around, and you can catch both the treasure chest and what's inside. 7. Enemies can be collected and sent back, or you can kill them outright, although that takes quite a few hits, but gets you money. Once I sent some back, I found those enemies started populating the town, not sure if it was a certain number that triggered that, but really some I'd only sent a could back and one was there. Some had quests for me to do like bring them a flower and such. That netted me item rewards. 8. Searching around enough I found a Seed of Life that raised my life bar from 4 slimes to 5 slimes. 9. Rockets shot me around from level to level around the first area. Occasionally I accidentally hit stuff into the cannons and they got shot around too. 10. Following some Platypunks, I eventually got to the Sphinx boss. Had to hit jewels a bunch of times on his front paws without getting hit too much. Despite me having medical herbs (which I currently have no idea how to use), I didn't use them but won. Not too hard a first boss fight. 11. Getting back to town I heard that someone saw an orb headed north out of town, so I guess that's where I'm headed now. 12. No ship battles yet, which are supposed to be this iteration of the tank battles from Mori Mori 1 (the one we got as Rocket Slime), but it may happen soon as I'm headed out to sea now.
  38. 4 points
    I know I'm not all that interesting, but ouch.
  39. 4 points
    Today, 33 years ago the first Dragon Quest was released! This series is still going on strong with 3 new Dragon Quest games being released later this year, Dragon Quest Monsters (with Mia and Erik), Dragon Quest Xi S, and a new mobile game (and DQBII for overseas).
  40. 4 points
    OK, that's enough. We've had thoughtful discussion on the topic, but this is what it always comes down to. And I'm sick of it. The Dragon Quest series has gone through so much to get to where it is today. Now you can't have a mainstream topic about it without shitposts like this. "DQ supports homophobia." No, it doesn't, and if you want to wish for his death, feel free to chant that all you want on ResetEra. I'm done seeing it here. Discussion is fine, but I'm going to start deleting ignorant and spiteful comments.
  41. 4 points
    Ugh don't me started on this. Oh well too late. If you are easily offended please look away. So I'm guessing what happened is the following: Some nothing loser video game "journalist" NPC combs what xe considers far-right Japanese TV show for dirt to gain notoriety. Maybe it is far right but it's hard to get an objective look at things in another language, and I don't trust most "journalist". Plus one of those a-holes dissed my DQ5r translations so their taste is clearly questionable! Sugi baby said something bad about a protected class with a very powerful and rich lobbying group. (Bad move, should have said it about white straight males, you'd be a hero!) Said group agitates cowardly video game corporation. Corporation bends over and apologies like a #$*!. Dragon Quest has 99 problems, but Sugiyama isn't one of them. Most of the 99 is the shitty localizer (if it still 8-4) and the other issue is injecting western "values" so not to offend. I'm specifically talking about the changing of crosses and the censoring of a character in DQ9 physical appearance. I'm sure there's more but I don't remember them at the moment. When I play a game made by a Japanese company its partially to escape the current lameness and thinskinness of the US culture. The more DQ is sanitized, the more cookie cutter it becomes. I don't care about SJWizm and I refuse to be forced to care. Oh, and keep on whaling! Just in case this is TL;DR, here is everything I said in a nutshell: Get woke, go broke.
  42. 4 points
    Hit mute. 1. On the game if you're so offended. 2. On the people who do that. Don't need to read so much negatively in life.
  43. 4 points
  44. 4 points
    My only comment to those who might stop after beating Mordegon, I IMPLORE you, to play the post game material before ultimately forming an opinion on this game.
  45. 4 points
    I created a new forum that will bring in the tweets from the @DragonQuest twitter feed, maybe that will help with news if people don't have twitter. https://www.woodus.com/forums/index.php?/forum/134-dragonquest-twitter/
  46. 4 points
    IGN’s review actually complains about bunny girls and puff puffs lmaoooo. He says “what do bunny girls add to the Dragon Quest experience?” What a moron.
  47. 4 points
    I was there. Got to meet Yuji Horii, play the demo, and hang out with Michi and the staff. Michi interviewed me, but I felt like I kinda flubbed the interview, in retrospect. I thought up a bunch of stuff I could have said to market the game better, later. It was kind of on the spot and I couldn't collect my thoughts fast enough. I'll do better next time.
  48. 4 points
    Not very The Pornhub ads didn't get too much traction.
  49. 4 points
  50. 4 points
    At last, it is done. The ten stories for the members of the Denizens guild! For those who don't know, I'm a big fan of the Etrian Odyssey series from Atlus. One of my favorite aspects of the series is the freedom to create your own characters, and with Etrian 5's large emphasis on character customization, I decided to create a Dragon's Den themed guild called the Denizens. Unfortunately there are only 10 classes in game, so apologies for so many being left out. With that said, please enjoy the back stories I've created for the 10 members, and let me know what you think. There's a lot text ahead, so get ready! (As a side note, I'll be posting the stories in separate posts below so it's easier to keep things individual.)
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