Jump to content

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/09/2009 in all areas

  1. 9 points
    With work being so hectic this last summer and fall and the move of my domain to a new host, I just realized this morning that in October the Den has been up for 20 years. Funny how a hobby site has turned into such a long running establishment.
  2. 7 points
    *Mad scientist laughter* YES ! YES! *ahem* So I enjoyed playing DQ I-III on mobile. But it always bugged me that you had these nice official scripts stuck in an awful mobile port experience. Pining for the idea of a proper console experience with the official script, I looked for ways to find the script, but it looked pretty hopeless. I just came across aluigi's program quickbms and forum dedicated to extracting data from various games. He actually had a script made for DQII mobile. I guess someone asked for it a long time ago, and didn't really detail how to use the script. But I just figured it out and huge thanks to aluigi figured out that DQIII was slightly different in its compression and now have all three games ripped in both text and graphics. Sound might be a different story I'm afraid. Plans are already in motion to possibly port the script to the NES/SFC versions. dq123rip.7z
  3. 7 points
    Came up for auction, so I thew $25 at it just to see what would happen and it worked. I ended up with the domain http://dragon-quest.com/ Have it forwarding to the Main Den landing page
  4. 7 points
    This morning I caught this image of people enjoying DQ XI at Anime Expo. Everyone but this poor girl. I have dubbed her The Sad Dragon Quest Girl. From now on, she will be the face of American Dragon Quest disappointment. Here's just the face for a reaction image.
  5. 6 points
    Paced poorly? Yes. Quest flaggy? Absolutely. Bland? What? No. Seriously, there are some valid complaints out there about 7. Bland isn't one of them.
  6. 6 points
    Super Smash Bros. Ultimate director Masahiro Sakurai appeared on the launch livestream for Dragon Quest XI S: Echoes of an Elusive Age Definitive Edition today, and he and Dragon Quest creator Yuji Horii discussed how Hero got into Smash Bros., and more. Here are the highlights: It all started with Sakurai and Nintendo saying that they had a proposal, which turned out to be asking if they could add Hero to Super Smash Bros. Ultimate. The proposal itself was very detailed, and Sakurai and Nintendo spoke very passionately, saying “We want to use Hero.” There was some discussion about whether a monster could be better, but in the end they agreed upon it. From Sakurai’s side, he says that requests to add in a Dragon Quest representative have been around for a long time, but he felt it wasn’t possible. However, Nintendo approached Sakurai, saying it might be possible, and so he ended up doing the presentation proposal with the intent of working with Dragon Quest, although what from Dragon Quest would be worked out later on. If he was told ‘no’ to Hero and ‘yes’ to Slime or something like that, he’d do it, but Sakurai felt Hero was the best option. That said, he did know that there would be many hurdles to working on Hero. For example, Hero hasn’t been seen fighting other characters before. And they haven’t gotten voiced before too. Sakurai was quite convinced that he’d be rejected really quickly, but the agreement came surprisingly quickly. According to the Square Enix side, it was partially because of Sakurai’s passion, and partially because the ‘best of’ element in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate was quite similar to that of Dragon Quest XI S, which brings together many elements from across the series. From Yuji Horii’s point of view, while before there was a resistance towards seeing Hero fighting other characters and other Heroes, it’s slowly become less strict, seeing as there is the smartphone game Dragon Quest Rivals, and such. With Smash Bros. being such a popular series as well, Horii wanted Hero to join. Sakurai acknowledges that there are people who hate characters like Hero who add in random elements. However, in the first place, Super Smash Bros. is an unpredictable game where you have fun and move onto the next game anyways. One particular spell Sakurai had trouble with was differentiating the Frizz line of spells (neutral B) and Sizz/Sizzle (via Command Select). He had to look up how the spell functioned in the original games, and how Frizz would float out to hit the enemy, while Sizz would fly quickly and sear the enemy when it hit the enemy. Making the Yggdrasil’s Altar was indeed very troubling, to the point Sakurai thought of giving it up. Some other alternatives included the volcano. In the end, they decided upon the altar as it would show the world tree that symbolizes Dragon Quest XI. The world map as seen in the stage references the world map in the PlayStation 4 version, but otherwise is made entirely from scratch. image: https://www.siliconera.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/horiisakurai2_thumb.png Originally, there were only two Heroes set to join Smash Ultimate, being Erdrick and Eleven. But Horii later said it would be fine to have four Heroes join. According to Sakurai, he was ready to make eight different Heroes, but that wasn’t a realistic option. After Erdrick and Eleven, the hero of Dragon Quest VIII was decided as he was popular overseas. However, popularity wasn’t the only factor, as then the hero of Dragon Quest V would be included. But that Hero wasn’t known for using swords, but rather staffs. In the end, it came down to either the hero of Dragon Quest I or Dragon Quest IV, but as there wasn’t a unified image for Dragon Quest I’s main character across media, IV was decided upon. image: https://www.siliconera.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/horiisakurai3_thumb.png Q & A part The two directors were asked about what sort of job being a game designer is. For Sakurai, he feels it’s all about bringing together that sort of “fun” which is usually intangible and subjective into a product. For Horii, it’s something from a more practical angle, as in game designer = game creator. Regarding the good or fun points of being a game designer in terms of the work itself, Sakurai finds it nice when he’s working on something alone, as he’s usually in the director role and talking to people. Instead, it’s more fun or interesting for him when he’s working on inputting data and the like, especially the moment there are successful results. For Horii, as an RPG creator he loves the part where he’s setting the stats and characteristics of battles. Are there any secret techniques to coming up with ideas? No, according to Sakurai. He’s the type to work under pressure, and he approaches his work not in an imaginative approach (like coming up with imaginary movesets beforehand) but rather, thinking more task-like such as, “Okay, what should be the moves, which also manage to have Dragon Quest characteristics?” For Horii, he’s the type to get a lot of inspiration from other media, which transform into other ideas for his works. Sakurai is instead the type to get inspiration by playing many games, such as Dragon Quest Walk, The Legend of Zelda: Link’s Awakening, and Borderlands 3 for recent examples. How does he fit in so much game time? He plays games while doing other things like watching Netflix, or gaming while riding the aerobic bike. Are there any rules or policies they set for themselves as game creators? For Sakurai, while it’s quite an obvious one, it’s to think of what the players want. However, player opinions vary a lot. Overall, he tries to go for a wide range of players, but still keeping a certain amount of depth. For Horii, while it’s something similar, it also has to be fun to play for himself. How does Sakurai keep his work life and private life separate? The answer according to Sakurai is that he doesn’t think too much about it. It’s not that he thinks they are the one and the same for him, though. Sakurai has other hobbies like going driving, although he doesn’t want to make a driving game. For Horii, he’s more relaxed, until meetings where he sort of shifts into working mode. image: https://www.siliconera.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/hero1_thumb.jpg Director Advice The two directors were finally asked if there is anything they’d like advice on from each other. Sakurai went first, and asked about a certain dilemma that’s bothering him. When making a game like Dragon Quest XI that has such a large volume of content, how do you outdo it or go one step beyond for the next game? According to Horii, it’s not really a dilemma, as he doesn’t worry too much about outdoing each game in content, but it’s when he adds in all the ideas, the game just ends up really large in scale. So he just focuses on adding in the ideas he has. For Sakurai, he’s uncertain what to do next if there is a next game in the series. He’s making the current one with the mindset that this is the last one, and he thinks that it might be impossible to top this one, both cost-wise and expectations-wise. image: https://www.siliconera.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/horiisakurai4_thumb.png Horii had a more lighthearted question for Sakurai: Usually Sakurai is seen as a very reserved person, but does he ever take off that mask of stoicness, and what does he find fun? Sakurai laughed and said yes, he does, both privately and in his work. For example, in Kid Icarus Uprising, Pit and Palutena are always trading jokes, and that was all written by him as well. “I’m not that serious of a person!”, said Sakurai. Of course, as a game director, he puts on a stoic mask, and might say harsh things to his staff, but Sakurai thinks that if people were actually that serious, they wouldn’t be able to make fun games. He does acknowledge he has some trouble showing off that fun side of him though, and even demonstrated a big “Yatta!” on the stream. Super Smash Bros. Ultimate is available on Nintendo Switch. Dragon Quest XI S: Echoes of an Elusive Age Definitive Edition just released in Japan today for Nintendo Switch, and will release tomorrow in the West. I beat @Dakhil on posting something DQ news article related wise? What’s up with that? 😜
  7. 6 points
    Haha. And eight years later I see this. Over 22,000 subscribers strong now. More than half have joined in the past year.
  8. 6 points
    They just announced it here: Prize is a Slime plushie and a poster signed by Yuji Horii. There was eight winners total. I think I’m the only Den member who won? Either way, REPRESENTING.
  9. 6 points
    I'm sorry that I just noticed this topic. #1 - I'm sorry, but no one here is going to be able to help. That's not me being a jerk, that's just the reality of it. I'm a teacher and have had some mild experience with this kind of thing before, but online help can make you feel better a bit, but there's nothing we're doing that's going to really help much. You need help IRL. Please, please, please, let someone at school know about this. Talk to a guidance counselor. Talk to a trusted teacher. There's going to have to be some sort of intervention (and I've got no idea what - family counseling, ...?) to make this in any way better. YOU need to be the one to start this as you're already showing signs of needing that attention. Get help. Get it today. Talk to someone you know today. Please.
  10. 6 points
    Short on time. Will expand later. As I've mentioned in the past, we as consumers have the right to vote with our wallet. Being a comic fan, there are certain creators I don't support, not necessarily solely because of their views, but how they treat others. A comic is different, though. It has a creative team of 1-6 people. Games can have hundreds. If people are truly offended by Sugiyama's views, if they don't want to support the game, that's their choice. Though I see many in the gaming press and punchlines like ResetEra using Sugiyama for shallow virtue signaling. This gives the series bad press it doesn't deserve. It cast so much of a shadow that Square Enix had to give a PR apology. Out of everyone working on the titles, Sugiyama is the least involved, and he's done less and less with every title. While I don't like his views, it's not fair to punish the hundreds of coders, modelers, and testers.
  11. 6 points
    1) Only in the West does anyone really care, and even then it's a very small, but often vocal minority that frankly I can't stand anymore, as they make a mockery of "liberalism," having neither the balls to look themselves in the mirror for their hypocrisy, nor any shred of integrity of their beliefs...thus they constantly devolve into ever smaller and smaller groups looking for more and more problems to solve or conspiracies in the walls out to get them...OMG...THE PAINT IS WHITE...IT'S WHITE PRIVILEGE...OH GOD HELP US...WAIT WE DON'T BELIEVE IN GOD...OH SCIENCE DAMN YOU WH...OH WE DON'T BELIEVE IN SCIENCE ANYMORE...OH SOCIAL JUSTICE TENANTS SAVE US FROM THE PAINT ON THE WALLS...PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE...OMG IT'S OPPRESSING ME...IT'S OPPRESSING ME *SOBBING...MORE SOBBING* I NEED MY SAFE SPACE NOW...*CURLS INTO A BALL* (liberalism requires absolute respect for free speech first and foremost, all other things follow after, so no true liberal in any sense of the word would care about Sugiyama's beliefs in terms of his work or anything he's related to, only his actions based on those beliefs as actions have real meaning and impact). I have no respect for the opinions or life of anyone who gives a hoot about Sugiyama's words. I care if he takes direct action, like advocates for Trans people to be put in concentration camps or denied basic rights. Other than that, as abhorrent as they are, they are words, and words mean only what you want them to. 2) Most civilians don't actually care, it's only those who indulge in identity politics, but that's due to forced indoctrination in schools since the 1970's, though in colleges since the 1950's. Though the original identity politics was at least about true equality. So I respect what I was taught, because it was just that white or black or gay or straight or whatever...who cares, let people be as they are. Self defense only if someone tries to force their political crap on you. Then just argue it out, unless they're idiots, in which case, walk away. If they physically need you to believe their world view...fight back. That was it. Plain and simple. Liberalism at its purest. Then it changed to Political Correctness and just devolved into the crap we see today. Mindless droning on with repetitious statements. Mass mobs where literally not one person is willing to talk or listen. People playing so hard into identity politics, now suddenly we're back to a point where we have to separate people again? For what purpose? For rights people already have that they claim they don't...oh, you mean special privileges from people where 80+% had nothing to do with your familial plight in the past, and most of whom have the same slavery bs in their history, but we just focus on one group? Whatever dude, get over yourself. Most don't want to defend someone like Sugiyama, but are forced to when dumbshits give a rats behind when someone has a stupid opinion but can't do anything specific about it because the whole of his/her country (or near enough) couldn't care less. 3) Japan doesn't care, as they take generally 1950's viewpoint on personal opinions versus work, which is the same way most liberal and conservatives in the US tend to think (except for those who actually care about identity politics). 4) Assuming SE should care, because it's supposed to be some modern age where we now have "right think" and "wrong think," not positions one can make their mind on, they still can't do anything and their hands are tied because Sugiyama owns the musical rights through his company Sugiyama Kobo. This means if they part ways, and if SE wants to release any Dragon Quest from that point forward, they would require a new composer, and would require remaking every composition from scratch, and not one of them can sound like the original music. The only things we would have access to are the already released copies of games and any CD the company Sugiyama Kobo decides to release. All digital versions would be scrapped and changed before rerelease to the new revisions. So essentially if SE did cut ties, they would be totally #$*!ed. They have to wait for him to retire and that's that. Any action to the contrary would kill the series in Japan. I don't think for one second the Japanese people would appreciate having someone condemned who is well respected (for their work), and I don't think for one second they would be happy replaying older DQ releases with new music, or new DQ releases with music that doesn't sound remotely like Dragon Quest so as to avoid a potential theft lawsuit from Sugiyama Kobo, which would likely happen even after his death, due to bad blood after having ties cut. Sugiyama isn't even an SE employee anyway, so even if they wanted to directly impact his life to quell things, they couldn't. 5) Square Enix owes the LGBTQ community nothing. Literally nothing. Sugiyama is Sugiyama, SE is SE. In capitulating and somehow doing something to "make amends" they become complacent and inherit guilt by default. They essentially claim ownership of his own words and opinions. Nevermind any concept would be giving into a certain entitlement culture. What's next, a son says he didn't like his mom's baking so she gets compensation? Are we only supposed to say things now that make people feel better about themselves? How far does that go? We've already seen where PC culture has headed in the West, and NONE, not ONE SINGLE DROP is remotely good. Not even a shred. It is evil, because it forces everyone into a sense of worry that anything they might say is somehow going to be taken the wrong way. So we start this same bs in Japan? No thank you. I want the culture dead gone and buried, because it doesn't belong. You don't get to demand compensation when someone says words you don't like. If this were a common practice, no one would be able to own anything, you'd be paying out the ass each month, and any payment gotten would be given out the next second. Nevermind it opens up the door for anyone to find anything hurtful or "hate" speech or a "hate crime" or "offensive." Here's a protip on life for those who don't get it. Offense is taken, not given. Everyone in this world will eventually meet someone who will be offended by the very fact you exist. That you wake up in the morning and take a breath of fresh air. That you make coffee. Offense for waving. Back in the 90's we learned to grow a backbone. Ok, so someone doesn't like me...whoopdie doo. They said something I find offensive...ok, maybe I'll throw some words back out, maybe I'll argue the point to convince them otherwise, or maybe I'll just not give a #$*! and walk away. Or hell, maybe I'll throw them the bird and walk away. Lots of other options.
  12. 6 points
    Our product manager played the game all the way through, barely touching sidequests, and his file is 95 hours. Mine is close to 200, but I also know I left it running a lot, so I'd estimate somewhere around 150-175 hours to platinum the game. There is SO MUCH content and even platinum trophy status didn't do EVERYTHING. Also, the "post game" is the least optional post game ever if you want a complete story. It's not a bonus. It's like a sequel built into the game.
  13. 5 points
    Well, this is awkward... a Slime Time episode about Final Fantasy! About a month ago @YangustheLegendaryBanditand I got talking about... well, talking. Talking more! We knew there were a great deal of former and future guests that wanted to get together and talk about some topics other than DQ. Heck, look at the forums & threads that get the most love around here more than a year after any news about non-mobile DQ titles. We're all playing other things so we figured we'd take a Sidequest and discuss other things. Thanks to @Pendy @RyuKisargi and @Bururian for joining us on this first foray, our first Sidequest!
  14. 5 points
    Dragon Warrior VII is contender for the absolute best game of all time, tied with Crash Bandicoot 2: Cortex Strikes Back and Dragon Quest X ONLINE: Rise of the Five Races
  15. 5 points
    Hello, hello! Once again, I'm playing through a Japanese DQ game and building a database of information about it. This time, I'm tackling Dragon Quest Monsters 2: Iru & Luca's Marvelous Mysterious Key on the 3DS. So far, the data I'm including are a comprehensive Monster List (including common and rare drops, scouting locations, breeding recipes, from which eggs they hatch, whether it must be traded, or WiFi gifts), Area-based monster lists, Egg hatching lists, Dream Egg hatching lists, the monsters owned by Other Countries' Masters, Monster Arena battle list, Mini Medal rewards, Costumes, and Scout Q challenges. This process is, of course, immense, as DQM2 on 3DS has 802 monsters in it; after about two weeks, I'm at 28.4% of that total (219 monsters). Also...my Japanese is rudimentary, at best. But, I managed to 100% DQ VII 3DS, DQ VIII 3DS, and DQ XI 3DS, so...I have faith I can complete this undertaking. At any rate, know that it's coming, and will hopefully be finished before DQ Builders 2 hits the shelves.
  16. 5 points
    Five years ago I asked all over the internet for help to translate the Wii game Dragon Quest Monsters Battle Road Victory and I got really discouraged by the lack of response. I am a huge Dragon Quest fan, I collect all the games in North America and all those that came out in Japan. I even collected all the various controllers, special editions, collector's editions of games, all the various consoles that came out with a Dragon Quest theme, figures and other merch I find interesting. My entire living room is a Dragon Quest museum. I have been doing this since Dragon Warrior came out. Recently, I started playing Wii games again and I was very much frustrated by the fact that I couldn't play Battle Road Victory properly (I even have the special controller that came out for it by Hori). So I asked on the facebook group Dragon Questers for help with 2 or 3 screenshots of my previous translation work to see if I could even get ONE translator or some help and I did. In the last two weeks, I have translated most of the menus, all the information screens, the hint roll outs at the bottom of the screen, made progress in finding a way to translate the dialog of the RPG mode and even found a way to translated the trading card (Way too many for me translate, theres like 315) Below are some sample screenshots of the translated stuff, and trust me when I say the word sample. Theres a lot of work thats already been done. I am posting here because I think I saw years ago someone who had most of the cards translated, and if you are out there, I'm reaching out to you. I know how you feel, not getting the required help. I feel you. Join me and the others in finally getting this project done. Meddling with the files is a lot of work, but I can do it and I can translate some stuff with my limited japanese knowledge.
  17. 5 points
    Prologue + Chapter 1 up now: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1uoRF-HcDR3U3cR23OeEMhssLF4Jd5jGj
  18. 5 points
    Out of all the words I could use to describe the DQ community, toxic isn't one of them. There aren't enough of us yet for that to be a problem, I feel.
  19. 5 points
    Took me longer than I anticipated and pastebin messed with my formatting a little, but here are the first four chapters ready to read. Chapter 1 https://pastebin.com/GyTkcH6h Chapter 2 Alena https://pastebin.com/r82b2qza Kiryl https://pastebin.com/aT37enxT Borya https://pastebin.com/v15urfzX Chapter 3 https://pastebin.com/1NZ1AvXC Chapter 4 Meena https://pastebin.com/SjxYtmUB Maya https://pastebin.com/Xu72WE4f Oojam https://pastebin.com/myYdhvNL Can't give any ETA's for chapter five, but I will be chipping away at it when I am able. If any lines are missing, let me know along with the context and I'll add them back into the main document.
  20. 5 points
    For once, Pokemon could work in their favor instead of against them: “Hey, you know how you’re all mad a large chunk of the Pokémon roster is being cut...buy DQM:J3!”
  21. 5 points
    I found this tape on a retro shop called Beep in Akihabara. It was in the junk bin surprisingly and I picked it up for my Dragon Quest collection as soon as I saw it. Now it became a rarity part for my DQ collection. I also have an old VHS player but I have to get it fixed first to watch it. I think it contains a walkthru type gameplay video but I'm not sure. I just wanted to share it with you guys.
  22. 5 points
    Saw this on the foursome channel. Perfectly sums up why I stick with the DQ fans.
  23. 5 points
  24. 5 points
    There are certain game companies I don't support and it all comes down to how the heads of the company interact with people. I'm not talking about people like Kamiya, which is mostly done for persona and laughs. It's the ones that spew nastiness and insult fans on forums and Twitter. Not only does it hurt the product, it hurts the employees. Putting "my views are my own" or some jazz in a bio doesn't absolve you when you're the face of a company. That doesn't mean you can't be passionate or outspoken. There's a certain level of responsibility people seem to be missing. Arrogance and spite have replaced constructive dialogue. Sugiyama, however, doesn't act this way at all. If you want to know his views, you have to actively seek them out. As far as I know, he's never associated his views with the Dragon Quest brand. That's what people are doing lately. It would be like saying supporting DQ supports real estate fraud because of Toriyama being named in the Paradise Papers. Both are hugely successful independent creators that are contracted to work on this series. Now if Yuji Horii was going around and saying those things and insulting people, that'd be one thing! That's not the case. Horii has always been friendly with the producers and community managers positively representing the brand. Sugiayama's views, while sad and unfortunate, is a tangent, convenient way to mar the series. So many of the people who make this stand think they're being so progressive; so woke. It's all just empty rhetoric. It doesn't help anyone.
  25. 5 points
    Did a little interview with a local magazine. Check it out!
  26. 5 points
  27. 5 points
    I've been gone from the den for a long time, and I think it's time I should come back and explain myself. Here's why: I've been extremely stressed by everyday things for the past few months, and school wasn't really helping. So far the whole year I've lost all my friends and been bullied. My depression came back (I think last year) and it got so bad that I eventually started cutting. This continued for about 5-7 weeks, until I finally told my social worker about my cutting and suicidal thoughts on the 15th of December. I had to go to the E.R and was there for the rest of the day. I'm still recovering, and i'm much better now. During that time I was stressed, I was still active on the den and said some pretty bad things. (Well extremely bad according to me) And I've also made some pretty pointless topics. So if you see anything rude or thoughtless from me, I hope you can forgive me for this. I'll try to be more thoughtful of others on the den from now on when I'm here. Sincerely, Dark Ember
  28. 4 points
    ^ I mean, the fact that it’s portable gives it an edge over the other console versions imo.
  29. 4 points
    Here is the first of the interviews. Interview Riku Sanjo What was it like hearing that there was to be an anime adaption the first time? I was surprised. Kind of like, "What, you can make an anime of it?" This was because, at the time the popular works in Jump would normally get an anime adaption, but I thought that "Dai" could not be an anime since there was the original "Dragon Quest" productions that it was based on. Then, once it was decided, I was shocked at the unusual speed that everything progressed. But at the time besides writing the script for "Dai" I was also writing articles for Jump, and I was writing the articles about articles about other anime so my impression was just that "My work has kind of increased". I was spending the whole day at the Jump Editorial department so it did not feel that difficult. My entire workload was too much. I was young (laugh). How were the meetings between you and the anime staff for things like script writing and series composition? We often had meetings with me the producer, the director, and the script writer discussing the larger direction of the story. Particularly I would do things like offer suggestions for things like new characters for content that was not in the manga such animated movies. It is at this time that I met Nobutaka Nishizawa, who years later I would meet up with again when I did script writing work for Toei Animation. When I was young, the animated movie that I found the most provocative was "Mazinger Z tai Ankoku Daishōgun". So I was very excited to meet and talk with it's director. The contents of the movie "Shinsei Rokudai Shoguo" highly reflect those emotions. At the time that the anime was aired toys were also being sold, and things were exciting across various media. I liked character toys from the start so I was touched to see the characters for a series I was involved with lined up on store shelves. In discussions with the toy producers, Takara (Now known as Takara Tomy) I was asked, "Sanjo Sensei, is there any type of goods that you would like?" So I said I would like something like the Star Wars figure line that was sold overseas. Since Dai is a party battle manga I wanted to keep the taste that "everyone is the main character" and wanted a toy series that had a lot of side characters released. After hearing this they made the "Adventure Hero Selection" toy series, which is the one I am most fond of. It is the only one that has Hadler and his 6 Commanders in color. I excitedly explained to the person in charge "There is even a toy of Carbonite Frozen Han Solo" which I think even now was the hint to the Frozen Leona campaign (laugh). In the anime (Both TV series and Movies) please tell us an episode that you most closely empathized with. The memory that is most vivid is the first movie. Since we were attempting trial of "anime debut through a movie" I collaborated with the staff as we puzzled over everything starting from the plot creation. If we started from "Derupa! Iruiru!" like in the manga then we could not show Dai's heroics. If we did "Dai Explodes!!!" then the final boss was a bit weak. So to deal with these sorts of issues we had the evil idol if Hadlar as an original feature to the anime, mixing elements from the one shot stories and the serialization. With the addition of Toshiko Fujita's lively voice to the finished work, I remember feeling extremely touched watching Dai moving around. This is the only animated work of "Dai" that has not been released to any home video product before, so along with my personal emotions it makes me especially happy. Please give a message to the fans who have purchased the Blu-ray Box. Everyone, thank you for the purchase. I thank you from my heart for not forgetting Dai over all these years, and for taking this Blu-ray Box into your hands. It's been so many years since the original broadcast, and we jumped over a laser-disc and DVD release (laugh), to go straight to a Blu-ray release. It is kind of like "Dai" to do that, and I think it is thanks to all of your continual support. Please keep your emotions over from these 30 years running, and continue to support the developments of "Dai". I am counting on you.
  30. 4 points
    Surprised nobody mentioned Yakuza: Like a Dragon. The main hero actually says he likes Dragon Quest and the game makes numerous little jokes / references towards Dragon Quest. Very excited and very happy that they will be having turn-based combat in this new Yakuza installment. Sega is just the best it has ever been right now... I'd even say that they have all the means of going back to console making business.
  31. 4 points
    Dragon Quest VII (PS1 version) is one of my favorite games of all time. The 3DS version is pretty decent, too. The overarching story and all of the supporting vignettes are pretty damned good. If anyone said it's boring or bland it's most likely due to a general dislike of the Dragon Quest series. The class system in the PS1 version is amazing.
  32. 4 points
    ...People say that? Where? I like DQVII, it's fun. I do think it tries too hard to be DQVI but bigger, but that doesn't mean it's a bad game on its own.
  33. 4 points
    Hi Den, I submitted my first guide to GameFAQs yesterday and it got accepted!!! *squee* https://gamefaqs.gamespot.com/switch/272749-dragon-quest-ii-luminaries-of-the-legendary-line/faqs/78327 It's a comparison guide about the stat and name changes for DQ2, mostly our English versions on the NES, GBC, and iOS/Android/Nintendo Switch. I wade a little bit into the original FC version, but not so much for the SFC or its fan translations. A lot of stuff didn't change or you can find it in lists for specific versions, but I wanted to see a side-by-side comparison. I think the only really new information is probably the increased experience values for monsters in the iOS/Android/Switch versions. I didn't see them anywhere (English or Japanese websites) so I recorded them during my recent Switch playthrough (so much more fun than on my phone, god knows why).
  34. 4 points
    The Unofficial Dragon Quest Roleplaying System The Unofficial Dragon Quest Roleplaying System is a tabletop RPG that aims to allow players to intimately revisit the worlds of their favorite adventures from the Dragon Quest video game series. Combining staple gameplay mechanics, locales, and monsters with well-proven conventions of dice-and-paper role-playing, above all else the game intends to combine the charm and style of Dragon Quest with the realism-to-fantasy that made successful Dungeons & Dragons so immersive. Below, I discuss what I consider my image for the game and future goals so that you may contribute your thoughts and ideas to the project. The Universe Dragon Quest has taken players on dozens of adventures through hundreds of cities, ruins, forests, caves and even subaquatic civilizations. In fact, the franchise has spanned multiple universes, and then within those universes themselves Dragon Quest games have spanned multiple worlds and then further within them multiple realms! These universes and worlds and realms viewed as a whole create what we call "The Dragon Quest Multiverse". Alefgard of the Erdrick Trilogy, and Zenithia, and the Almighty, the Dracovians, and the Celestrians are all recognized as existing simultaneously within the bounds of The Unofficial Dragon Quest Roleplaying System. However, not all of them -- nor any of them -- need to exist within any world that hosts the player's adventure. Every campaign inhabits its own independent universe inside of The Dragon Quest Multiverse, which runs by its own rules and is governed by its own laws, forces and deities and which is only connected to the rest of The Multiverse by raw chance and the mutual existence of themes, creatures and people shared only by the thread of fate. Thus, players are free to ignore or incorporate any lore from the Dragon Quest series that suits their game world and their narrative choice! The Player Character Player characters will be given a name and a a title for flavor. A section will be provided for players to freely describe hair color and style, eye color, height, weight, and their costume (the outfit the character wears inexplicable despite the equipment they carry with them). Their stats, skills and spells are defined by their Vocations. Vocations are catch-all terms which determine how characters grow stronger as they level up, what weapons they can use, what skill trees they have access to and what spells they learn. The capabilities of a character are determined by their stats. These are: Strength: the character's ability to deal damage with physical attacks. Resilience: the character's ability to sustain physical damage Agility: how fast the character can move, how likely they are to dodge Magical Might: the character's ability to deal damage with magic. Magical Mending: efficiency of healing spells Deftness: the character's ability to deal damage with ranged attacks, critical hit chance and when they act in combat. The Vocation System: All Vocations featured in the Dragon Quest series will appear in The Unofficial Dragon Quest Roleplaying System, and then some! The system present will be a reconciliation of the systems of Dragon Quest VI and VII, and that of Dragon Quests III and IX. Every player character will begin with a single Vocation. Whenever you level up, a die will be rolled to determine how many skill points you earn; these will be allocated to one of five skill trees determined by the player character's Vocation. These make the character more proficient when wielding certain weapons and allow them to gain access to new special abilities using a milestone-like format. Whenever 150 skill points are allocated, the character is considered to be a Master of their vocation. Whenever a player visits an Alltrades Abbey, they may change their vocation. When they do, their level is reset to 1, and all of their stats are equal to the value of their previous Vocation's stats halved, rounded up. This character can use any spells they've ever learned if the new Vocation has it in their spell-list. Furthermore, all Vocations use the same skill tree for a particular weapon, and any progress made in a skill tree in one Vocation will be carried over into any other Vocation that uses the same weapon. The Vocation is negligible if the character has become an Omnivocational Master of their particular weapon (100 skill points in that weapon's tree), allowing them to use the weapon as any other Vocation. Should the player become a Master of two Vocations, they have a chance of gaining access to an Intermediate Vocation, which shares qualities of the two child Vocations! An Intermediate Vocation can cast all Spells learned by the child Vocations, and will learn new ones. They, however, may not necessarily share all skill trees with their child vocations! What Else? This isn't a lot of progress, but it's a start. Unfortunately, though, making a tabletop RPG is a time-consuming process, and can take months if not years of balancing and designing. Even now, there's a lot of things I'm not 100% sure about in making this game. Included below are some goals I have for finishing the game and turning it into something playable, fair and fun. Combat -- I don't know if I'll use a traditional Dragon Quest-like turn-based JRPG format or a hex-based tactical TTRPG format. Growth -- Converting the stat growth, and determining base stats, from a video game to a TTRPG is a behemoth challenge to undertake. This also includes scaling everything to the players' growth. Out-of-Combat Skills -- I don't know how I'll determine how good a character is at tasks outside of combat. Spells -- Should I create new spells to provide more D&D-like functionality or fully retain Dragon Quest's simplistic charm? Magic Items -- How would I handle magic items on a functional level? Rolls -- Do I want to use a d20 format that utilizes all the dice or do I want to use a d100 system to replicate chances by percent? And even now, I'm probably forgetting hundreds of things I need to keep in mind for creating this game. This thread is simply to call attention to the project, and get everyone on board with what is intended as the greatest intimation of players to the world of Dragon Quest!
  35. 4 points
    Hmm. I see there's a disagreement in the Den and I'm not participating in it. Let's fix that with a controlled shock. *Smarty Pants Hat On* Let's Define a Term: An adaptation, in this usage of the word, is when a story is fitted from one medium to another, in this case transferring DQV from video game to cinema. What makes an adaptation good or bad depends on how well the story survives the translation (hence "faithful adaptation" is a compliment), which is a separate question from how good the actual story is -- counter-intuitively this means you can have a bad adaptation of a good story, a good adaptation of a bad story, or even a bad adaptation of a bad story that still makes a good final product because it improved/fixed the original bad story (note: this is very, very rare). So for Your Story to be a good adaptation, it would have to do a good job translating the DQV story to cinema. I argue, given that Your Story deliberately subverts the DQV story in order to make it a vehicle for its Teachable Moment about The Value of Playing Video Games, reducing the DQV story to a mere example of "someone's beloved video game", and given that as a mere example DQV is therefore irrelevant to the "true" story (because the example game could be anything: DQIII, DQVIII, Final Fantasy Whichever), that Your Story is not a good adaptation of DQV. To the storytellers, presenting DQV is not an end in itself, which is what every sane and honorable person would think, but a means to the end of lecturing the audience about The Value of Playing Video Games. The audience already knows The Value of Playing Video Games, it came to see a damned video game movie. I don't think an RPG adaptation would be necessarily disjointed -- I laid out an rough plan for boiling DQV to its bare essentials earlier in the thread -- but I do agree that it would be better served by a series. Each Dragon Quest game has enough material for at least a single cour's worth of anime, and after the first game three or four cours' worth if you know what you're doing. That could work, but you'd have to spin character value from basically nothing. DQ1 has only two major characters with any personality, Princess Laura and the dragonlord, and both of them are essentially plot devices.
  36. 4 points
    Probably shouldn't be putting out so many family photos out there, you never know who has an axe to grind.
  37. 4 points
    Welcome! Only thing I can say about these forums is that topics are merely suggestions around here. So expect a lot of threads to derail into something unrelated on a daily basis.
  38. 4 points
    https://nintendosoup.com/dragon-quest-xi-s-developers-we-have-finally-fulfilled-our-promise-to-satoru-iwata/ Thank you, Satoru Iwata.
  39. 4 points
  40. 4 points
    As many of you know Slime Mori Mori 3 / Rocket Slime 3 got fan translated this year on August 1st. It's the Beta, but really it's 100% translated, they just threw it out there for fans to finish bug checks. Recently I put down an offer on a Japanese copy of the game and an ebay seller and I worked something out... So, now I've got the game up and running and let me tell you, the game is as fun as the other two. Granted, I'm only about an hour into it, but damn it's addicting. I'm going to use this thread to document my time with the game and be a somewhat walkthrough of sorts. So far here's what I've done: 1. The game opens with you on a ship. You learn the standard stretch and launch yourself attack. 2. You land at the castle town and need to gather wood to fix the ship. This provides an introduction how to hit items up into the air and collect them. 3. When you go to the castle, stuff goes down with Don Clawleon again and he steals some Rainbow orbs. Of course the king needs YOU to go get them. 4. You hop on your boat and steer it towards Flat Desert, where the first orb has turned a Sphinx into a big bad guy. 5. You land at a pretty sparse desert town and it's time for the first dungeony area. You make your way through just like the other games, hitting things up into the air, catching them and throwing them on empty train cars that take them back to town. 6. You and each train car can hold up to 3 items at a time. There are tons of treasure chests around, and you can catch both the treasure chest and what's inside. 7. Enemies can be collected and sent back, or you can kill them outright, although that takes quite a few hits, but gets you money. Once I sent some back, I found those enemies started populating the town, not sure if it was a certain number that triggered that, but really some I'd only sent a could back and one was there. Some had quests for me to do like bring them a flower and such. That netted me item rewards. 8. Searching around enough I found a Seed of Life that raised my life bar from 4 slimes to 5 slimes. 9. Rockets shot me around from level to level around the first area. Occasionally I accidentally hit stuff into the cannons and they got shot around too. 10. Following some Platypunks, I eventually got to the Sphinx boss. Had to hit jewels a bunch of times on his front paws without getting hit too much. Despite me having medical herbs (which I currently have no idea how to use), I didn't use them but won. Not too hard a first boss fight. 11. Getting back to town I heard that someone saw an orb headed north out of town, so I guess that's where I'm headed now. 12. No ship battles yet, which are supposed to be this iteration of the tank battles from Mori Mori 1 (the one we got as Rocket Slime), but it may happen soon as I'm headed out to sea now.
  41. 4 points
    In Dragon Quest VIII, when you return to Trodain. It’s absolute misery walking through that place. A once flourishing kingdom reduced to rubble, with the cursed citizenry frozen in place as a grim reminder that people lived there when it fell. Add to all that the fact that it’s in such a state of disrepair and ruin that it’s become home to monsters that you must fight adds to the sting.
  42. 4 points
    I know I'm not all that interesting, but ouch.
  43. 4 points
    Ending suck x100 now with that last spoiler. I hadn't heard that part yet. The day after I started the online petition for it, I read the spoilers and it immediately made me want to pull the plug. Without saying it here for all to see, yeah, that really sucks. It cheapens the whole Dragon Questness of the movie. If that's the entire message and plot, basically you just screwed with the most cinematical, cohesive, lovely story just to prove a point & send a message. If that's the point, do it via some other proprietary series. Bleh, sucks they licensed out the name for that.
  44. 4 points
    Today, 33 years ago the first Dragon Quest was released! This series is still going on strong with 3 new Dragon Quest games being released later this year, Dragon Quest Monsters (with Mia and Erik), Dragon Quest Xi S, and a new mobile game (and DQBII for overseas).
  45. 4 points
  46. 4 points
    I created a new forum that will bring in the tweets from the @DragonQuest twitter feed, maybe that will help with news if people don't have twitter. https://www.woodus.com/forums/index.php?/forum/134-dragonquest-twitter/
  47. 4 points
    I kept this relatively quiet because I didn't know if I'd get the position or if I'd get through the writing or not, but it's official. I'm a news writer/reviewer for RPGamer.com now! A completely unpaid position, but pretty legit media website. They even send employees to E3 and PAX and such and interview some companies. I had a couple quick news things that I posted this week, but today a larger piece dropped that I'd put together as part of my application and then worked on quite a bit in recent days. https://rpgamer.com/review/dragon-quest-monsters-joker-3-import-review/ Loved this game and I really wanted to get it out and posted on the heels of the DQXI review they had up Monday, and success!
  48. 4 points
    I was there. Got to meet Yuji Horii, play the demo, and hang out with Michi and the staff. Michi interviewed me, but I felt like I kinda flubbed the interview, in retrospect. I thought up a bunch of stuff I could have said to market the game better, later. It was kind of on the spot and I couldn't collect my thoughts fast enough. I'll do better next time.
  49. 4 points
    A game that's merely translated often ends up as uninspired drivel. Localization adds much deserved personality to a game, and DQ exudes personality, no matter what you may think of the series. There is no problem with the team. You just prefer a more direct, yet bland job.
  50. 4 points
    I don't think the problem is SE doesn't care. That was technically a problem post-DQMJ, the last game while Wada was president, that SE directly promoted, and asked the help of journalists for some direction (ask Dwaine). DQIV was at a time when SE was gearing up for major FF13 promotions, and due to their corporate restructuring under Wada, being very compartmentalized, again, one can ask Dwaine or there are a myriad number of articles posted around the time of Yoichi Wada's ousting from the time there was internal rumbling the board would remove him to the point after he was demoted to head the mobile division... I have a link somewhere covering insider information on how most submissions and requests never go through the right channels because divisions are split too deeply into subsections with too many middle managers, and no direct feed lines for the company to see, no direct routing lines to assure money or upper management ideas are secured, done, paid for, etc. DQV was at a time when SE noticed DQIV had sold poorly, likely never checking if DQIV was marketed, again due to the nature of splitting a company into too many sub-divisions and middle managers where stuff gets lost in translation easily if one or two middle management groups are overtaxed and overburdened, which often happens in almost every government office and any corporation that follows the same path. It's a case of, like with IV, the head not knowing how the body is functioning because it's too much muck to work out, and they assume the middle managers will sort out the mess and notify of a problem. However it's less likely to happen if the blame falls squarely on one or two shoulders and someone is likely to be fired...which is much more stigmatized in Japanese culture versus Western culture. DQIX was paid for, but had to be halted as it was being localized at the same time SE was overburdened with the initial release of FF14, and cleaning up the mess they made after personally destroying the FF11's fanbase from 2.5~3 million down to a few hundred thousand in one day....one day. All after claiming FF14 would be replacing FF11, and 14's initial rollout plagued by low numbers of FF11 fans flocking to it, but at the same time, FAR more than they assumed, as the servers had trouble handling the initial load. Nevermind the constant gripes, and SE having to close it down. In that media frenzy over FF14's beta debacle, DQIX was clearly put on the back burner, and Nintendo offered to carry the torch, or SE approached Nintendo and asked. Whichever happened, due to the nature of compartmentalization, multitasking is actually MUCH harder for a company to do, as getting information flow from top to bottom requires several channels to pass through, nevermind issues like down servers, lost information in translation, overburdened middle-managers, and lower/middle/upper people not wanting to take blame so shifting the message to reduce impact on their department. DQVI had the displeasure of being around both in the aftermath of FF14's initial rollout, and SE cleaning up the mess, alongside pushing FF14's upcoming release. There were a few other things going on at the same time. Take the other scenarios, put in that corporate upper managers would place priorities on certain products, and rereleases would have lower priority. Take into account 4 and 5's sales as opposed to 9's, and the priority was MUCH lower from upper management, who likely had no clue why 4 and 5 sold so poorly, due potentially to lack of information and intentionally false information to avoid being fired from those actually responsible. Nintendo takes up the torch, but it's been sitting in limbo due to 14 for months and Plus Alpha was onto a new project, and thus 8-4 had to be hired. So yes, while lower priority, this would not have been a problem in the past had SE had better structuring, more open channels, and fewer split departments. Cut to Wada's deposal as head, and SE's corporate restructuring. They begin answering more random questions. They start actually addressing DQ, though usually with negative news, or wishy-washy statements. SE talks to the news more. Does more interviews of producers, directors, writers, etc. with the gaming press. There's more open news press at e3 (not just a showing and a demo room, but actual discussions of games with IGN/etc., something that hadn't been done since the merger). We see the mobile releases come relatively quickly to us...with a year apart at first, but eventually a few months apart between releases, and they even relocalize 1~3 for us. There's discussion of restarting DQ in the West, and a lot of open ended conversations, with deflecting or wishy-washy statements on DQ7. This happens over months, then direct talks about DQ Heroes, with a promise of DQ7. Then a retraction of DQ7...oops, looks like someone let it slip. Then we see more talk about how DQ11 is going to come over, and the PS4 direction and using unreal engine had Western gamers in mind as well as Japanese. Then lots of push about DQ Heroes. Then Horii let's it slip DQ7 and 8 are coming Westward. Then SE's second retraction, while trying to make it seem like the media heard Horii wrong, not that Horii himself was wrong (take note of this, it's rather significant). Then the official announcement and a teaser for DQ Builders maybe coming stateside. Then a discussion panel indicating DQ Heroes and Builders were also with Western gamers in mind. Then DQ Builders is announced. Then DQ7 is released. Then DQ8. Then DQ Builders is pushed harder than DQ Heroes 1 was. Then DQ Builders is released. Then DQHeroes 2 is announced Westward. Then Heroes 2 is pushed harder than Heroes 1 and Builders. Which is a gradual increase in willingness to promote the DQ franchise. Nevermind DQ Builders for the Switch was announced for us. Now we come to today. DQ, according to SE, has been pushed slowly leading up to DQ 11. They WANT DQ to do well in the US. It's not a matter of priority for them now. It's a matter of risk management. These are businessmen who aren't sure as to how DQ11 will fare. They have seen Heroes 1+2 and Builders do well enough to keep increasing the scale and level of promotion...slowly, but it has increased in time, scale, and commercialization. I had seen far more commercials for Heroes 2 than 1 and Builders, and for Builders than Heroes 1. Far more. They have mentioned not once, but at least five separate times that they want DQ to do well in the West, and they're willing to play the long-game over this. They're willing to cater to fan desires; DQ7 and 8...and no Nintendo is not THE reason, as further interviews with the director indicated, but Nintendo is significant in that it helped alleviate SE's burden of trying to get 7 and 8's promised releases while they were waaaay waaaaaaaaaaaaay late on FF15, meaning FF15 had priority, and with Nintendo backing it, it would help promote the games better than they could. They were already planning on 7 and 8 due to fan demand long before big N got involved. However we should thank the big N because it likely wouldn't even have seen youtube videos, or scant videos at that (more of the Healix team...which are likeable, but have a smaller audience and aren't particularly skilled at salesmanship). For them, this is a priority, but they're taking it from a general risk assessment position. They want a big push, rather than small gradual pushes, like with DQ8 and 9. They're too scared as to the potential sales ceiling of the game and the fear of few new incomers to the DQ franchise to play it the smart way of gradual releases or leaks. The only things about this recent debacle, is that they clearly WERE going to release information. We all saw the twitter and facebook feeds. It's how I knew about them...ghosting this site. We all saw the removal of the banners for those October postings. We all saw Sony jump the gun on DQ11 as a result, around the same time, just prior to the DQ facebook and twitter changing their avatars/backgrounds to the plain slime and giving the teaser statement that the promised release info was upcoming soon. As a certain dancing cat, mnicolai, mentioned, Nintendo's resurrection of the Nintendo Direct was promised to have the Switch account system introduced. SE also had yet to reveal the DQ11 Switch info...and while perhaps the lack of Nintendo being prepared with their Switch reveal, and absent from the direct was a major factor, I do think that SE definitely rethought their direction, and realized for them it's cheaper and more manageable to release the info with the Switch ready as well. So I don't think we'll see anything until the Switch has been announced and fully revealed for Japan, and likely prior to Nintendo's new account system introduction. Especially since DQ11 is not an online game. I'll likely be alone on this, but I don't see SE as a personal entity, but rather a business entity. It's not about care...oh, they care. They do WANT DQ popular worldwide. It's the golden egg, and Horii was the Goose. It's always cost substantially less to develop than FF, with far far far far far fewer people...like 1/3 to 1/10th the team sizes as compared to FF teams for mainline, gaiden, and remakes/remasters/ports. So it's a profit driver, and arguably is the sole reason SE still exists, and the reason why most KH and FF fans should be sucking DQ's dick, or they wouldn't have their franchises. Yes this is clearly due almost entirely to the Japanese market. It's about risk assessment and old-world thought and approach to sales. It's about their internal apprehension of sales potential for DQ11, and why they're so mum about it. However, I should point out, with the exception of DQ3, the mobile releases in just the US match the mobile releases in Japan for sales. Almost 1:1, with DQ1 being higher in Japan, but DQ6 being higher in the US, and the US having a higher representation of Android to iPhone users...usually the number of Droid to iPhones is higher in Japan: https://www.statista.com/statistics/260415/market-share-held-by-smartphone-operating-systems-in-japan/ Though at the time of the first mobile releases, iPhone was king, the most critical point of 2014 had a higher droid presence. Though arguably likely real share in terms of current users is closer to 50/50 in Japan and it's hard to say who has the edge, while it's a bit closer to 70/30 Droid to iPhone in the US. What I'm getting at is that iTunes does not directly give you sales numbers for games.. DQ3 is the exception because DQ3 went free in Japan on its anniversary. Went from roughly the same sales as the US to multi-millions of downloads. The point of this? SE knows the market isn't much different in real-terms, with mobile...or should if they pay attention. Then again they haven't exactly attempted a "free" DQ game here. Not once, which is insanely stupid. So maybe not...actually that's a point in your ballpark, and a strike against my reasoning, a pretty heavy one. I think you'll all be shocked at the level of promotion SE puts into DQ11 when it comes time.
×
×
  • Create New...